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I may be some time: ice and the English imagination epub

by Francis SPUFFORD


I may be some time: ice and the English imagination epub

ISBN: 0571179517

ISBN13: 978-0571179510

Author: Francis SPUFFORD

Category: Travel

Language: English

Publisher: Faber and Faber; New edition edition (1997)

Pages: 384 pages

ePUB book: 1346 kb

FB2 book: 1233 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 702

Other Formats: mobi lrf azw docx





Written in the style of a very dry doctoral dissertation, I May Be Some Time clouds some interesting ideas with turgid prose, tortured sentence structure, and an air of academic snobbery. 16 people found this helpful.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Francis Spufford (Author). ISBN-13: 978-0788197796. Written in the style of a very dry doctoral dissertation, I May Be Some Time clouds some interesting ideas with turgid prose, tortured sentence structure, and an air of academic snobbery.

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Francis Spufford's I May Be Sometime: Ice and the English Imagination is, in this context, a refreshing study of the effects of. .

Francis Spufford's I May Be Sometime: Ice and the English Imagination is, in this context, a refreshing study of the effects of peripheries on the centre through the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Through a study of the incorporation of polar exploration into the public life of England, Spufford examines the peripheries of both geography and gender. The book considers the spirit of English identity as expressed through polar exploration. The large navy and skilled force of seamen created during the Napoleonic Wars and the need to keep it employed continued a tradition of global exploration by the English.

12 Kasım 2018, 09:21 ·. Herkese Açık. I May Be Some Time : Ice and the English Imagination by Francis Spufford. Neufeld on Spufford, 'I May Be Some Time: Ice and the English Imagination' H-Environment H-Net. 28 Eylül 2017, 10:34 ·.

I May Be Some Time book. Francis Spufford explores the British obsession with polar exploration in a book that Jan Morris, writing in The Times, called, "A truly majestic work of scholarship, thought and literary imagination. The title, a last quote from one explorer to his party as he left their tent never to return, embodies the danger and mystery that fueled the romantic allure of the pol.

Francis Spufford FRSL (born 1964) is an English author and teacher of writing

Francis Spufford FRSL (born 1964) is an English author and teacher of writing. 1 Early life The Child That Books Built, 2002. Backroom Boys: The Secret Return of the British Boffin, 2003 - nominated for the Aventis Prize. Red Plenty, 2010 - longlisted for the Orwell Prize, and translated into Dutch, Spanish, Estonian, Polish, German, Russian and Italian, with versions in French and Turkish following.

Spufford, Francis, 1964-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Francis Spufford is a highly cultivated English writer who possesses vast stores of curiosity. A senior lecturer at Goldsmiths College, University of London, he has written nonfiction books on such diverse topics as polar exploration ( I May Be Some Time: Ice and the English Imagination ), reading and character formation ( The Child That Books Built ), rocket science and computer technology ( Backroom Boys: The Secret Return of the British Boffin ), the Soviet Union. Spufford is an avid fan of science fiction, unsurprising given his keenness for alternate worlds.

I MAY BE SOME TIME: Ice and the English Imagination. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. Spufford, of the Guardian in London, plumbs the cultural fascination and aesthetic attraction of cold regions for British explorers, and how their romance with snow was fashioned by an evolving. His first book, I May Be Some Time, won the Writers' Guild Award for Best Non-Fiction Book of 1996, the Banff Mountain Book Prize and a Somerset Maugham Award.

Spufford, of the Guardian in London, plumbs the cultural fascination and .

Spufford, of the Guardian in London, plumbs the cultural fascination and aesthetic attraction of cold regions for British explorers, and how their romance with snow was fashioned by an evolving national sensibility, in this smartly argued, wide-ranging book. Each chapter is an archaeology of the British love affair with ice, Spufford often unearthing unattractive strata: the class nature of exploration, colonialism, racism toward the Inuit, who undercut all the heroism by the simple fact that they lived where the explorers more often died

I may be some time: ice and the English imagination [paperback] SPUFFORD, Francis [Jan 01, 1997]
This book sounded more interesting in a bibliography in another book I read about arctic life and exploration than it proved to be. I found the honesty with which some exploration failures were treated refreshing when it comes to heroic failures in the Scott and Franklin expeditions. On the other hand I wasn't at all excited by some of the silliness regarding hollow earth and holes in the poles which I felt were, at the least, over represented and perhaps could have been dealt with as footnotes. The book did broaden my knowledge of British efforts. On a recent visit to Auckland I saw replicas from Scott's expedition in a museum setting and felt I had a greater appreciation because of this book. That being said, this book wasn't right for me.
Francis Spufford's "I May Be Some Time: Ice and the English Imagination" seeks to show the relationship between polar exploration and English literature. He asks why British polar explorers willingly placed their lives in jeopardy in the harsh polar environment; was it gold or glory or something else? The answer, Spufford believes, rests not with the explorers themselves but with the English imagination as expressed in the writings of such the Brontës, Edmund Burke, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Charles Dickens, and others.

At a sublime level this book is about the power of ideas to shape imperial ambitions. Romance about the Arctic distorted perceptions both of reality in England and in the far-off lands of the North. The concept of the sublime in the works of Edmund Burke and Samuel Coleridge found themselves deployed to explain the inspiration and terror of the Arctic ice and the environment of the cold. Arctic explorers transmogrified the sublime into a nostalgic identification of the Poles with the best of the human imagination. Conquest of the Arctic in Spufford's estimation might be equated with virtue and destiny. It propelled the British Empire into an unending quest for knowledge about the Polar region.

Spufford's argument is quite useful, but it tends to downplay what I view as the critical component of English exploration of the Arctic, the quite mundane and practical desire to find a water route around the Americas to foster trade with Asia. The search for the Northwest Passage had motivated English Arctic expeditions since the sixteenth century and while imagination certainly aided in sustaining those efforts in the face of failure, there was a clearly understood and delineated rationale for undertaking them that had little to do with the sublime and philosophies. A fascinating account nonetheless, that requires serious consideration by anyone seriously interested in the history of Arctic exploration.
I May Be Some Time is a wonderful--and moving--book. Readers who were disappointed in it may have been looking for an adventure story. Well, it is that at the end, but the end comes as the climax of a long, complex, and fascinating cultural history. Readers interested in English culture in the 19th century--the world that gave rise to much Arctic and Antarctic exploration--will find this book compelling. Spufford examines imaginative literature of the period, the impact of new developments in the sciences, changing ideas of history and culture, British pride in the empire, and the roles expected of and actually played out by men and women whose lives involved them in exploration. He concludes his study with a profoundly moving narrative account of Scott's doomed final journey. This is a book that requires patience and attention on the part of the reader, but it is also a book that offers real rewards.
Relentlessly prolix, unbearably sententious, I found reading this book like climbing out a snowdrift - hard work! There are whole pages without a paragraph and my skipping techniques were tested to the utmost. What a pity - the history of polar exploration is a fascinating subject that deserves better treatment: perhaps Mr Spufford is trying too hard. Within the heaps of slush there are a few nuggets of, if not gold, then silver plate, but most are contained in the last chapter, which takes some getting to! All told, a classic Don't Buy.