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The Serpent's Coil epub

by Farley Mowat


The Serpent's Coil epub

ISBN: 1585742872

ISBN13: 978-1585742875

Author: Farley Mowat

Category: Transportation

Subcategory: Transportation

Language: English

Publisher: The Lyons Press; 1st edition (April 1, 2001)

Pages: 192 pages

ePUB book: 1642 kb

FB2 book: 1200 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 931

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The Serpent's Coil book.

The Serpent's Coil book. Mowat does an expert job of tying all the disparate elements at play in the saga; weather, politics, honor and money all played a role in the events that occurred. Like Sebastian Junger’s The Perfect Storm, The Serpent’s Coil is gripping and keeps you on the edge of your seat.

Farley Mowat had already written a book titled "The Boat Who Wouldn't Float," so he could very easily have called this volume, "The Ship Who Wouldn't Sink

Farley Mowat had already written a book titled "The Boat Who Wouldn't Float," so he could very easily have called this volume, "The Ship Who Wouldn't Sink. The Serpent's Coil" is a companion book to "Grey Seas Under" and continues the story of ocean-going salvage tug operations in the Atlantic.

Farley McGill Mowat, OC (May 12, 1921 – May 6, 2014) was a Canadian writer and environmentalist. He achieved fame with the publication of his books on the Canadian north, such as People of the Deer (1952) and Never Cry Wolf (1963).

Tired of everyday life ashore, Farley Mowat would find a sturdy boat in Newfoundland and roam the salt sea over, free as a bird.

He also brings back Mutt, the famous hero-dog of his classic THE DOG WHO WOULDN'T BE, and his pet owl Wol, hero of OWLS IN THE FAMILY. Tired of everyday life ashore, Farley Mowat would find a sturdy boat in Newfoundland and roam the salt sea over, free as a bird. What he found was the worst boat in the world, and she nearly drove him mad.

I first read Farley Mowat's "The Serpent's Coil" and its companion volume "The Grey Seas Under" about the ocean-going salvage business when I was in my teens and recently decided to read them again

I first read Farley Mowat's "The Serpent's Coil" and its companion volume "The Grey Seas Under" about the ocean-going salvage business when I was in my teens and recently decided to read them again "The Serpent's Coil" recounts the story of the former Liberty ship "Leicester" which left London in 1948 and due in large part to chronic radio problems encountered Hurricane VII (this was prior to the naming of major storms). After her ballast shifted she rolled precariously and ultimately the crew abandoned the vessel (with several perishing).

Author:Mowat, Farley. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. All of our paper waste is recycled and turned into corrugated cardboard. Read full description. The Serpent's Coil by Farley Mowat (Paperback, 1978). Pre-owned: lowest price.

The Serpent's Coil" recounts the amazing story of the Liberty ship Leicester, which sailed for New York from England in the summer of 1948, ran into a hurricane (with the loss of six lives), and was abandoned in the mid-Atlantic.

The Lyons Press is also proud to publisher The Serpent's Coil, another book of sea adventure by Farley Mowat. From the Back Cover: The Serpent's Coil recounts the amazing story of the Liberty ship Leicester, which sailed for New York from England in the summer of 1948, ran into a hurricane (with the loss of six lives), and was abandoned in mid-Atlantic.

The 1948 rescue of the Liberty ship Leicester is chronicled in vivid detail--a story that takes readers through two hurricanes before the crew is finally rescued. Reprint.
I first read Farley Mowat's "The Serpent's Coil" and its companion volume "The Grey Seas Under" about the ocean-going salvage business when I was in my teens and recently decided to read them again. I remembered them as exciting tales of the sea, but now I appreciate them not only for their compelling adventure narrative, but also for the delicate balance of historical account, human interest story, and technical detail Mowat was able to so deftly weave into relatively short books.

"The Serpent's Coil" recounts the story of the former Liberty ship "Leicester" which left London in 1948 and due in large part to chronic radio problems encountered Hurricane VII (this was prior to the naming of major storms). After her ballast shifted she rolled precariously and ultimately the crew abandoned the vessel (with several perishing). Astonishingly, the ship did not sink, but continued to drift in the Atlantic Ocean.

The story then shifts to the deep sea tugs "Foundation Lillian" and "Foundation Josephine" and the drama associated with attempting to salvage the "Leicester". The personalities of the people involved are expressed brilliantly, as are the problems faced with sharks and competition trying to claim the abandoned ship (the big Dutch tug "Zwarte Zee" was also trying frantically to find the "Leicester" as doing so could result in a huge payout). Before the adventure was over there were numerous obstacles to overcome including yet another hurricane. This was truly a case of defying the odds.

This is one of my favorite books ever about the sea, and I highly recommend it as well as "The Grey Seas Under". Farley Mowat was one of the best adventure writers in history, and if you have any interest in ships, salvage, adventure writing (the story is completely factual, but it reads like a page-turning novel crafted for high drama), or just excellent nonfiction these are great books.
I've probably read this book 20+ times since I first met it when I was 12. It never gets old.

It is the kind of macro/micro writing that I think Mowat does spectacularly well, now focused on the story of three ships -- two deep-sea rescue tugs and one Lend-Lease surplus freighter.

A far-from-comprehensive list of things I learned from this book:
* What the legs on oil-drilling platforms are called.
* What kind of ballast you get from the Thames.
* The effect fog used to have on radios.
* What a Carley float is.
* Why you can't just tie up to the ship you're towing.
* How much list 60 degrees is.
* How some hurricanes start.
* What happens when your boiler explodes.
* How big a pump you can move in a dory.
* What it's like to fly a plane into a hurricane.
* How much weather satellites have changes the world.
* What the Great Circle Track is.
* What the Beaufort scale is.

And so much more. I can't get over how meticulous the research on this book is. The bit with the meterologists in Africa. The book that Sparky sets his soldering iron on. The thing is that Sparky (on the Leicester) died in the storm, so someone must have seen his cabin or inventoried his stuff? But it gives the whole book so much texture.

And it's not just the battle to save one ship. I still laugh at the stories of the crewmen, the guy from Come-By-Chance who was planning to take back blackstrap rum and retire forever, or the crew getting "pirate fever" and flitting all over their salvaged boat.

I think the reason this book and its companion are so repeatable for me is that I get dropped into a whole different world, and that world is as richly constructed as any of the most intricate science fiction books I read. It just happens to be history instead of make-believe.

Read if: You enjoy a good story. You love books about boats. You have liked other Mowat. You love seamless learning.

Skip if: You think non-fiction books should be dry. You are not that into learning salvage techniques of 60 years ago.

Also read: Grey Seas Under, the companion book about Foundation Maritime.