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By-Pass Control (The Tiger Mann Series) epub

by Mickey Spillane


By-Pass Control (The Tiger Mann Series) epub

ISBN: 0451092260

ISBN13: 978-0451092267

Author: Mickey Spillane

Category: Thriller and Mystery

Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense

Language: English

Publisher: Signet Books (May 1967)

ePUB book: 1357 kb

FB2 book: 1602 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 179

Other Formats: lit doc rtf docx





The By-Pass Control book. Tiger Mann series - One day a scientist decided to play God. He made a small improvisation in the US Intercontinental Ballistics Missile system

The By-Pass Control book. He made a small improvisation in the US Intercontinental Ballistics Missile system. A slight change that made it possible to push a button - and wipe America off the map. Then he disappeared. Tiger Mann's got the toughest job of his career. He's got to find the scientist before the Russians do. Tiger kills an enemy master-spy and invades the lair of the spider-woman - a femme with a steel-trap mind and an ever-lovin' body.

More than 225 million copies of his books have sold internationally.

Born Frank Morrison Spillane in Brooklyn, New York City, Mickey Spillane started writing while at high school. During the Second World War, he enlisted in the Army Air Corps and became a fighter pilot and instructor. After the war, he moved to South Carolina. More than 225 million copies of his books have sold internationally. He was uniformly disliked by critics, owing to the high content of sex and violence in his books.

The Killing Man. Spillane Mickey.

1966 The By-Pass Control  . Spillane's work was later praised by Max Allan Collins, William L. DeAndrea and Robert L. Gale. 1967 The Delta Factor  . DeAndrea argued that although Spillane's characters were stereotypes, Spillane had a "flair for fast-action writing", that his work broke new ground for American crime fiction, and that Spillane's prose "is lean and spare and authentically tough, something that writers like Raymond.

Mr. Grady seems to have the utmost confidence in you, Mr. Mann, he told me. I nodded while he offered me a smoke and held a lighter out to me.

You can read book The By-Pass Control by Mickey Spillane in our library for absolutely free. Mr. We don’t often get visitors.

About By-Pass Control. Tiger Mann’s got the toughest job of his career. One day a scientist decided to play God. He’s got to find the scientist before the Russians do. Tiger kills an enemy master-spy and invades the lair of the spider-woman-a femme with a steel-trap mind and an ever-lovin’ body. Mickey Spillane is one of the world’s bestselling novelists, with sales of over 200 million copies worldwide of his more than 30 books, including the series featuring hard-boiled private eye Mike Hammer. In 1995 he was named a Grandmaster by th. ore about Mickey Spillane.

By-Pass Control (The Tiger Mann Series). Which is a bother because when the book opens, Tiger is about to wed Rondine, the chick he had spent almost all of Day of the Guns tormenting with intent to kill (don't ask me to explain it, just read the book if you're curiou. Anyway, a call comes in right on the morning of the wedding and, damn it all, it's a Plato call, which means it's super duper serious.

THE BY-PASS CONTROL by Mickey Spillane Chapter One The guy was as good as dead and knew it. Crouched there on the floor he looked like a shapeless bundle and only a bloodied face with still-hard. THE BY-PASS CONTROL by Mickey Spillane. Chapter One The guy was as good as dead and knew it. Crouched there on the floor he looked like a shapeless bundle and only a bloodied face with still-hard bright eyes marked him as a man.

Spillane practiced and perfected his writing craft by writing comic books.

Hardcover Paperback Kindle. Spillane practiced and perfected his writing craft by writing comic books. He wrote for the Batman, Superman, and Captain America series. After high school, he attended Kansas State College on a football scholarship. He was a competitive swimmer. This book introduced another main character, Tiger Mann, who was a super spy similar to James Bond. Mann was extremely anti-communist and violent. Mann was an agent who loved danger and solved mysteries. Book of the month: I can’t push the Peter Ash series enough here on BSIO.

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Spillane's greatest work was his Mike Hammer series. Some of his other series have their moments, but not like that. The Tiger Mann series consists of four secret agent novels. A secret agent, though, prone to sudden explosions of violence Hammer-style, leaving blood, guts, and bodies strewn about. Indeed, the book opens with the following: "The guy was as good as dead and knew it. Crouched there on the floor he looked like a shapeless bundle and only a bloodied face with still-hard bright eyes marked him as a man. His breath came in short, sobbing gasps and he tried to keep his guts in with both hands pressed to his stomach."

By-Pass Control is a bit weak on the plot - a scientist with a secret code to control all the ICBMs has disappeared and the race is on to find him. Mann battles his way up and down the coast, leaving a trail of Bodies in his wake and maybe a few broken hearts after some highly charged scenes. Tiger Mann is a ladies man in a the hard-charging macho-style, telling one lady that She was more than a woman. In fact, she was "a doll with everything going for her from a beautiful face to a wild body with a mind to match and I love you like hell. You have capabilities only I can appreciate and I want them all.” Of course, he saves his best appreciation for Rondine ( the new one): she of the "ruby-hued tips like tiny warheads capable of destroying a man on contact unless they were disarmed first with a gentle touch."

Overall, a fun book, but not great.
Spillane's writing is good, but this story was just too predictable. Oh, and it is mislabeled as a Mike Hammer story - it isn't.
I liked it
Good Cold War yarn. Nowadays it seems any idiot can hack into the Gov system so a by pass to control the bomb is quaint.
Fast paced, frighteningly tense moments leaving me breathless. Plot twists that boggle my mind. Author's
writing style for this genre is superb!
The book arrived in timely fashion alright, I am pleased about that, but the seller pasted bar-code label that extends from the C to the R covering 1/3 of the word Control and most of the description below that word. I don't know why he insists on screwing up an old somewhat rare book with such unthinking care. You'd think a dealer would have more respect for books. The thing is you can't get the damned sticker off without greater damage to the book. The story of course is a good one. Nope, it's a super story. Tension makes for a good plot. And this is it.
Loved the fast pace and fast action. Mickey Spillane at his finest - will recomend it to all that follow his books.
The By-Pass Control (1966) was the fourth, last and weakest of Mickey Spillane’s mid-60s Tiger Mann books. Mann, Spillane’s attempt to capitalize on the era’s James Bond-driven espionage/spy fascination (and perhaps to air his very right wing views on the Cold War), was entertaining for a book or two but it’s easy to see why the author pulled the plug on the series after only four installments.

As with his Mike Hammer books of the late 40s/early 50s, Spillane basically ran himself into a dead end with a static character, repetitive plots and one-note approach (he would put Hammer on hiatus for a decade before reintroducing him in 1962 with The Girl Hunters). Except perhaps for the first installment, Day of the Guns, where the Tiger Mann character is introduced and in which Mann’s borderline psychotic treatment of future fiancee Rondine drives the story, the books are practically interchangeable. Each has Mann racing against time to head off the greatest catastrophe in history (how many times can you blow up the world?) while fighting off both enemies and supposed allies.

Meanwhile, the Rondine character, who might have provided some extra narrative interest and perhaps even provoked some development of Mann’s persona, is left largely in the background as Mann pursues his manic quest of the moment (and for a man supposedly deeply in love, he seems not only disturbingly prone to sleeping with any other babe in sight who strikes his fancy but doesn’t seem particularly bothered about it).

To an extent a formulaic approach to plot doesn’t particularly bother me. To take an example from one of Spillane’s contemporaries, Ross Macdonald also basically recycles the same plot over and over in his Lew Archer novels of this same period. Each starts with a fairly small matter that Archer is asked to investigate (he’s private eye), which then balloons into murder (often multiple murder) until Archer connects supposedly random dots that inevitably intersect at some point in the past and cause tragedy in the present.

The difference is that the sardonic but principled Archer is a much more nuanced character than either Mann or Hammer, and there is always a subtlety to Macdonald’s supporting characters that not only add drama to the proceedings but make Archer’s interactions with them much more interesting. By contrast, Mann’s interactions rarely leave the lizard brain level even if Spillane has an undoubted talent for writing entertaining tough guy dialogue.

I have in the past confessed to enjoying Spillane’s books and I don’t take that back. However, there is a point at which his approach just runs down for lack of new ideas. For the Tiger Mann books, The By-Pass Control is that point. If you're interested in espionage thrillers of this period I would point you to John Le Carré, Donald Hamilton's Matt Helm books and of course Ian Fleming. For crime thrillers, few are better than Macdonald's Archer series.