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The Way Some People Die epub

by Ross MacDonald


The Way Some People Die epub

ISBN: 0553237225

ISBN13: 978-0553237221

Author: Ross MacDonald

Category: Thriller and Mystery

Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense

Language: English

Publisher: Warner Books (June 1990)

ePUB book: 1763 kb

FB2 book: 1784 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 220

Other Formats: docx txt azw lrf





Ross Macdonald’s real name was Kenneth Millar. Born near San Francisco in 1915 and raised in Ontario, Millar returned to the . as a young man and published his first novel in 1944.

Ross Macdonald’s real name was Kenneth Millar. He served as the president of the Mystery Writers of America and was awarded their Grand Master Award as well as the Mystery Writers of Great Britain’s Gold Dagger Award. Also by ross macdonald.

When Ross Macdonald heard the opinion that The Way Some People Die was his best book, he said he hoped it. .

When Ross Macdonald heard the opinion that The Way Some People Die was his best book, he said he hoped it wasn't true, because that would mean he had peaked rather early (this is only the third in the series). I rate The Ivory Grin and the Galton Case very highly, and every Archer novel is worth reading; but this one may well be the best.

Way Some People Die rare book for sale. Like a hard-boiled Balzac, Archer travels high and lo. he Way Some People Die was one of his greatest tours, a dark Technicolor travelogue filled with striking scenes. he Way Some People Die was one of his greatest tours, a dark Technicolor travelogue filled with striking scene. o many crime-fiction critics and writers, Some People became the book to match or bea. genre classic.

The Ross Macdonald Collection: 11 Classic Lew Archer Novels: A Library of America Boxed Set (Lew Archer: The .

The Ross Macdonald Collection: 11 Classic Lew Archer Novels: A Library of America Boxed Set (Lew Archer: The Library of America, 264-279-295). While LoA volumes of this kind tend to feature thinnish paper and smallish type, this new volume is a fine bargain, especially in hardbound issue. It is also happy that the Library of America, in this publication, has put its imprimatur upon Ross Macdonald as a "serious" American writer.

While Ross Macdonald lacks some precision in descriptions of places, people . Actually I’ll do better than that, every character in ‘The way Some People Die’ feels real and rounded, as if they could stride out of this book and carry a whole novel by themselves

While Ross Macdonald lacks some precision in descriptions of places, people, and atmosphere of the undisputed classic of genre, the former is still really good in his own right. You do feel like you really ended up in noir version of California in early fifties with living breathing people. Actually I’ll do better than that, every character in ‘The way Some People Die’ feels real and rounded, as if they could stride out of this book and carry a whole novel by themselves. It actually makes me feel bad about the innumerable thrillers I’ve read which just make do with stock, cardboard characters – like eating tofu when you know there’s steak in the world.

Macdonald first introduced the tough but humane private eye Lew Archer in.The Way Some People Die – 1951. The Ivory Grin (aka Marked for Murder) – 1952. Find a Victim – 1954.

Macdonald mentions in the foreword to the Archer in Hollywood omnibus that his detective derives his name from Sam Spade's partner, Miles Archer, and from Lew(is) Wallace, author of Ben-Hur, though he was patterned on Philip Marlowe.

It drew a broad bright band diagonally across my body, like the sash of yellow satin that went with a South American decoration. I sat up, feeling my legs constricted, and saw that Galley had pulled. the spread across me. She stirred sleepily at her end of the bed. You’ve been dead to the world for two hours. It isn’t very flattering. I missed my sleep last night. I didn’t mind, really. You sounded like my father. My father was quite a guy. He died when I was eight. And you remember what his snoring sounded like?

In The Way Some People Die, Lew Archer embarks on a missing persons case that starts at a house in Santa Monica .

In The Way Some People Die, Lew Archer embarks on a missing persons case that starts at a house in Santa Monica within earshot of the coast highway and rifleshot of the sea, and takes him on a violent and twisted journey through Los Angeles high and low. The Barbarous Coast exposes a world of hidden crime and corruption in the movie business, as Archer intrudes on the well-protected secrets of a studio head. Set against the background of a glittering yet darkly enigmatic Southern California, Macdonald’s books are both unsurpassed entertainments and emotionally powerful evocations of an outwardly prosperous, inwardly turbulent America.

He sat for a while with his head down, then spoke in a stronger voice. I scored three touchdowns that day, four if you count Mildred. I was seventeen when William was conceived, eighteen when he was born. There wasn’t much I could do for him. I had no money. I was trying to make it through college

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There is a lot of talk and comparison to Spade, Marlow, and other noir detectives. As I continue through the series, and admittedly, cannot remove Paul Newman's portrayal, I have begun to feel that MacDonald is breaking out of that (stereotyping) mold, heretofore, appropriate. I don't feel the deepness of Chandler's Marlow-esque angst and that's ok. The physical rough-and-tumble of Sam Spade is never clearly reached. Is it okay to have a turn-of-decade (read 1940s-1950s) noir detective that is full of the former's patter and retains just enough of the latter's penchant for mixing it up? I think so, and I think, MacDonald, through the series migration makes a strong, standout case. If there is a fault, it may lie in MacDonald's need to make everything so commonplace that we should expect these types of cases to go on, more than they do, under our pedestrian noses. While limited, and Lew Archer/Ross MacDonald fan probably feels they have at least 3-4 Lew Archer cases percolating in their heads. I would love to hear from others on that point!
When Ross Macdonald heard the opinion that The Way Some People Die was his best book, he said he hoped it wasn't true, because that would mean he had peaked rather early (this is only the third in the series). I rate The Ivory Grin and the Galton Case very highly, and every Archer novel is worth reading; but this one may well be the best. It is too pat to call it Chandler-esque, because Chandler never wrote a book as good as this.

All the details are interesting and true to life- life in post-war southern California. There is professional wrestling, a mob boss who drinks buttermilk, an Italian guy whose brother wrecks his boat, nurses, junkies, a Reno divorcee, all woven into a complex but not convoluted plot.

I had only read this previously in some disintegrating paperbacks (one from the 70s, one from the 80s), so I was glad to get it for Kindle.
This and other Ross Mcdonald novels of the era are wonderful tales about the cases of a PI in the late '40's and early '50's in Southern California. They provide a wonderful sociological over of the life and times of this bygone time. Readers of genres other than the PI/mystery tale will also find his stories entertaining, educational and at times downright hysterically funny. In this, his third Lew Archer, novel he presents well developed characters while taking the reader through the landscape of developing California and surrounds with a tale with many twists and turns.
This noir crime "mystery" novel is in the tradition of a classic Dashiel Hammet novel, but if possible has an even more gritty feel. I felt drawn into character, PI Archer, and his hardboiled take on solving crimes. The plot had enough twists to offer some surprises, and the gritty, period centric style, along with the colorful and flawed characters kept one interested throughout the novel. As is the case with literature of this period it doesn't have any gay, minority or dominant female characters, but the author does a great job bringing his characters to life.

While I gave it 5 stars, the novel is still less than a masterpiece, and doesn't always flow quite as well as it should. However, it still admirably matches up, and mostly surpasses other comparable literature in this genre. I recommend this to anyone who wants to enjoy a great detective novel with a gritty feel to it.
Pretty good blend of action, mystery, and social observations. In other words, MacDonald delivering in fine form. Enjoyable and a good entry in the Lew Archer series. Only flaws are the conclusion seems on the obvious side, and there were points where Archer seemed to be spinning his wheels and I felt that I was spinning along with them - or rather that it was filler. But hey, what's a detective story without some twists, turns, and dead ends?
I had read Ross McDonald's novels back when he was in his prime - 50s and 60s. I chose this novel (The Way Some People Die) as I wanted to remember what it was like to read his work. I had not previously read this novel.

McDonald's work takes some adjustment for me. He doesn't write mysteries per se. This, and his other works, are not "who dun it" books as does another McDonald (Phillip) write. And this McDonald doesn't write of action and adventure as does still another McDonald (John D).

His works are studies in the human character living in California at the time of his writing (~early 1950s). He digs into personal behavior through his character (Lew Archer) digging into the events of the story as he finds them.

There is not a lot uncertainty about who did what to whom here. Archer uncovers evil around the heroin business and this novel is about what that evil is and what it does to the characters in this novel.

There is a lot to like about Ross McDonald's work - principally character studies and characterizations of his times, as well as his flexible use of the English language - but I more enjoy novels where what happens next is the attraction which makes me want to turn to the next page. I more enjoy the early Dashiell Hammett Continental Op stories, Anthony Boucher mysteries, Ross Thomas adventures, Don Westlake's comedy-adventure-mysteries, and less enjoy Ross McDonald's character studies. But if they are what you enjoy this is probably a good one.
a twist at the end worthy of Agatha Christie -- but a sterling early entry in Macdonald's searing dig into postwar Los Angeles and the costs of changing cultural and economic landscapes on WWII survivors and families.
The way some people write. Wow.