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The Manufactured Identity epub

by Heath Sommer


The Manufactured Identity epub

ISBN: 1606965506

ISBN13: 978-1606965504

Author: Heath Sommer

Category: Thriller and Mystery

Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense

Language: English

Publisher: Tate Publishing & Enterprises (June 23, 2009)

Pages: 308 pages

ePUB book: 1399 kb

FB2 book: 1281 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 857

Other Formats: lrf docx lit mobi





The Manufactured Identity book. The Manufactured Identity is clinical psychologist Heath Sommer's ever-escalating immersion into the world of unlikely friends who each awaken to find their faithful companions missing.

The Manufactured Identity book. Months after his mysterious disappearance from a routine fishing trip, no one really expects over-the-hill Texas housewife Lory Latchley to find her missing husband-especially her husband.

The Manufactured Identity is clinical psychologist Heath Sommer's ever-escalating immersion into the world of unlikely friends who each awaken to find their faithful companions missing without warning or reason. Desperate to find meaning in their pain.

The Manufactured Identity is with Heath Sommer. PagesPublic figureAuthorThe Manufactured IdentityVideosDr. Sommer's interview on KZBQ. 25 September 2009 ·. Here's the radio interview that aired this morning! Related videos.

Months after his mysterious disappearance from a routine fishing trip, no one really expects over-the-hill Texas housewife Lory Latchley to find her missing husband-especially her husband. The Manufactured Identity" is clinical psychologist Heath Sommer's ever-escalating immersion into the world of unlikely friends who each awaken to find their faithful companions missing without warning or reason. Desperate to find meaning in their pain, they are thrust by the auspices of fate into a common thread of mystery and human frailty.

In The Grand Delusion, Dr. Heath Sommer brings to life the precursor stories of characters John Joe, Addy Siwel, and Merci Bowku, who were introduced to the world in the 2009 contemporary mystery The Manufactured Identity

In The Grand Delusion, Dr. Heath Sommer brings to life the precursor stories of characters John Joe, Addy Siwel, and Merci Bowku, who were introduced to the world in the 2009 contemporary mystery The Manufactured Identity. Terror-struck, the three protagonists vie against a backdrop of ironic evil as they are stalked by an unidentified villain who breaks all the rules and sends Chief of police and reluctant clairvoyant Frank Murphy scrambling against the clock in a murder mystery showdown that leaves all questioning what is real and what is beyond this world. In the end, the fate of all may reside in the unstable hands of rookie pastor John Joe, but ultimately Lory and her newfound partners will uncover a truth so unnerving it makes even infidelity look palatable. PagesPublic figureAuthorThe Manufactured IdentityVideosHeath Sommer Interview Pt1. 2 September 2009 ·. Here is Part 1 of Dr. Sommer's interview on The Mike Siegel Radio Show from September 1st, 2009. The Manufactured Identity" is clinical psychologist Heath Sommer's ever-escalating immersion into the world of unlikely friends who each awaken to find their faithful companions missing without warning or reason

Months after his mysterious disappearance from a routine fishing trip, no one really expects over-the-hill Texas housewife Lory Latchley to find her missing husband especially her husband. The Manufactured Identity is clinical psychologist Heath Sommer's ever-escalating immersion into the world of unlikely friends who each awaken to find their faithful companions missing without warning or reason. Desperate to find meaning in their pain, they are thrust by the auspices of fate into a common thread of mystery and human frailty. In the end, the fate of all may reside in the unstable hands of rookie pastor John Joe, but ultimately Lory and her newfound partners will uncover a truth so unnerving it makes even infidelity look palatable.
First off, I want to say I never knew how much I loved to read psychological thrillers. As an avid GoodReads reviewer I was recommended this book by someone. I quickly went to the AMAZON Kindle store and bought this book. With school I havent really found much time to read, but I always make an exception if there is a really GOOD book out there. After reading this book I realized the problem wasnt school, it was that I had not read a really GOOD book in the past six months until now.

The Manufactured Identity is great. Its hits the ground running right from the beginning. The books narratives are divided by a few different people which at first seems confusing but you get connected to the characters and look forward to hearing the changing view points. The storyline is original and is definitely a mind trip! I was pleasantly surprised to know that this was the first in a series of books.

I highly recommend this book for someone looking for some different. By all means this is an adult level reader because some of the topics it touches are real and deep, and not for everyone. I am currently reading the sequel (or actually its a prequel) The Grand Delusion, which is the second book in this series.

Now stop reading this review and go get it!
I really enjoyed this book. I like books that keep you guessing until the end. This book does exactly that. I was so intrigued by it I couldn't put it down. Once I was done, I was so glad I had bought all three because I immediately started the second book.

Does this book jump around? Yes, it does. You can get a little confused on who is who and wonder, How is all of this going to come together?" But it does, and it is well worth it!

I thoroughly enjoyed this book!
I downloaded this book on my Kindle based on the 5 star reviews I read here. I am wondering if we read the same book! I kept on to the end just to see if the ending justified wading through pages of poorly written dialogue, and ludicrous scenarios. I agree with the other reviewer who gave it one star, how this book got past an editor's desk is a mystery. The premise is ridiculous, the writing is mediocre, some of it laughable. That description of John emerging from the plane (as the other reviewer noted) is awful - I read it a few times in disbelief. I read about two books a week (sometimes more) and after reading literally thousands of books, I am always looking for that one that captures your mind and your heart, that you can lose yourself in and be transported to another world. This was definitely not one of those! Save your money. Skip this one.
Engaging, with a few twists. I enjoyed it and recommend it.
This is an incredible book! I finished this book in about 4 days, even with my very busy schedual. This book is very well written and leaves the reader stuned at the end. I would deffinatly recomend this to anyone.
The plot was ok, the writing a bit clunky, but the pace kept the book lively. I liked the ending.
This novel was absolutely wonderful! I kept wondering what was going on and how to piece the book together until the very end. I am looking forward to the next book in this series.
Let me start this review by saying that I am a lifelong reader. I belong to a discerning book group; I read 2-3 books per month; and I enjoy a variety of styles of fiction, from Girl with the Dragon Tattoo-style thrillers to historical literature like Year of Wonders to modern classics like Little Bee and Let the Great World Spin. In other words, I am regularly exposed to mass market books as well as Pulitzer Prize and Booker award winners. The Manufactured Identity (TMI) is not quality literature. In fact, it is barely readable.

With a book this bad, you would imagine that I would just quit early on, but to do the book justice and to be able to write a fair review, I did force myself to read to the end to learn the reason behind all of the confused people in the book. Let me say I was underwhelmed with the "exciting finale" so praised by other readers. It did not mitigate the pain of having to read the previous 280 pages of poorly drawn characters, inane dialogue, and just-plain-awful descriptions. By the end of TMI, I just felt cheated and misled by the 16 other reviewers, no doubt friends and patients of Mr. Sommer, who gave the book 4- and 5-star reviews.

With a good book, the words flow and allow you to get caught up in the plot and the characters. In bad fiction, you are constantly stumbling, starting and stopping over phrases and vocabulary so much that you never really get a chance to connect with the characters, even if they are realistic creations. You know when you are 10 or 12, say, and you're writing a story for the first time and you launch into a description and then use the most flowery adjectives available in your limited vocabulary? Well, reading TMI is like reading the work of someone who has never written fiction before *ever* and who is randomly selecting substitutes for common adjectives from the thesaurus, whether they fit the context or not.

Here's one passage from the book, pg. 99. It is but one example of many that are cringe-worthy. See if you can get through it without wincing:

[Addy is meeting John who has just arrived on his private plane and is astounded at how he has changed since she last saw him.] "Dr. Martens led tan khaki's one-by-one onto the faded white wing base, which worked concomitantly to coax a medium-sized leather coat out into the open air. At the executive position atop the coat collar was a stone-faced and cut gentlemen, hiding his eyes behind a dark pair of '90s era Ray-bans. As if posing for a session of GQ, John Joe lifted both of his arms to his head and ran his fingers across his neatly organized hair, then stretched his back and chest and swiveled far to the right side before hunkering down and making his way onto the asphalt in front of of the girl he used to stalk."

Yes. And there's plenty more where this came from.

It is obvious that Mr. Sommer knows his stuff as a therapist; the clinical language he tosses around in the pages devoted to one-on-one and group counseling is proof of that. But having a Ph.D in clinical psychology and an interesting idea for a book does not a writer make. Mr. Sommer would do well to take the draft of any new novel he is considering--and I see he has already generated a sequel to TMI--to a creative writing group. Honest critiques from those working regularly at the craft of writing would do his newer works nothing but good.