Favorite Son epub

by Steve Sohmer


Favorite Son epub

ISBN: 0553273108

ISBN13: 978-0553273106

Author: Steve Sohmer

Category: Thriller and Mystery

Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense

Language: English

Publisher: Bantam (September 1, 1988)

ePUB book: 1329 kb

FB2 book: 1166 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 594

Other Formats: lrf doc mobi txt





by Steve Sohmer (Author).

by Steve Sohmer (Author). I first bought this book back in '87 when I was just fourteen years old and, to be honest, my sole motivation for the purchase came from the pre-publications publicity dealing with the novel's somewhat explicit sex scenes (actually rather tame by today's standards).

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Aging FBI agent Mancusco and his ambitious young partner Ross pursue the assassin who killed Colonel Octavio Martinez and critically wounded Texas senator Terry Fallon. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

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Favourite Son. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. Place of Publication. All of our paper waste is recycled and turned into corrugated cardboard.

Toronto ; New York : Bantam Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Steve Sohmer (born June 26, 1941 in Savannah, Georgia) is a Shakespearean scholar, author of fiction and nonfiction books, a television writer and producer.

Steve Sohmer (born June 26, 1941 in Savannah, Georgia) is a Shakespearean scholar, author of fiction and nonfiction books, a television writer and producer, and former network television and motion picture studio executive. In 1966, his first novel, The Way It Was was published by Robert Gottlieb of Simon & Schuster.

September 1988 : USA Audio Cassette. by Steve Sohmer. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780593013960.

Aging FBI agent Mancusco and his ambitious young partner Ross pursue the assassin who killed Colonel Octavio Martinez and critically wounded Texas senator Terry Fallon, while Fallon's political career booms as a result of media attention
I first bought this book back in '87 when I was just fourteen years old and, to be honest, my sole motivation for the purchase came from the pre-publications publicity dealing with the novel's somewhat explicit sex scenes (actually rather tame by today's standards). I recently sat down and reread the book and discovered that, hidden amongst an overly complex and trashy plot, Favorite Son was actually a moving examination of the loss of innocence in 20th Century America.

The plot deals with the aftermath of the attempted assasination of Sen. Terry Fallon, a charismatic liberal from Texas who becomes an American hero and a potential Vice President. Unfortunately, Fallon remains a rather flat character. Luckily, even if Fallon doesn't engage the imagination, Sohmer has created a rogue's gallery of other characters who really stick with you. To echo many others, aging FBI agent Mancuso is truly one of the most engaging, likeable characters I've come across in a long time. At the end of the book, I actually did find myself saddened to be parting his company. As I think someone else said, its a shame Sohmer didn't write more Mancuso novels.
Well, this is the first book I've ever read by this author-indeed I don't know if he's written any more. While the book was, in general, well written, it was a little complex. What I mean is this: at 520+ pages and more characters than you could shake a stick at, at times I found myself having to backtrack to figure out what was going on or why something had happened. If it weren't for this fact, I'd give the book four stars but because the same story could have been told in about 100 fewer pages without losing anything, I can give it no more than three.
Errr. wish I could star a book without reviewing it.

Aside from a good book, it has held up well over time. Happening to read this during the obama/romney political season, and interesting to see political nonsense hasn't changed since '88 when the book was written.