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Traitor's Purse epub

by Margery Allingham


Traitor's Purse epub

ISBN: 0434018856

ISBN13: 978-0434018857

Author: Margery Allingham

Category: Thriller and Mystery

Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense

Language: English

Publisher: William Heinemann Ltd (September 30, 1989)

Pages: 203 pages

ePUB book: 1833 kb

FB2 book: 1711 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 682

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Contents Cover About the Book About the Author Also by Margery Allingham Dedication Title Page Chapter I Chapter II Chapter III Chapter IV Chapter .

Contents Cover About the Book About the Author Also by Margery Allingham Dedication Title Page Chapter I Chapter II Chapter III Chapter IV Chapter . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22. Contents. Also by Margery Allingham.

The gentle summons was very near and very intimate. It sped through the weeping of the storm and stood close to them. er, determined, inexorable. Lugg glanced over his shoulder. Campion was well in the shadow, so he picked up his gun and advanced towards the window with all the easy confidence of an innocent householder expecting a visit from the police. He drew back the curtains cautiously, as a good citizen should, allowing only the minimum of light to escape

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Traitor's Purse (1941: US title The Sabotage Murder Mystery). Coroner's Pidgin (1945: US title Pearls Before Swine).

Margery Allingham: A Biography by Julia Thorogood (1991); revised as The Adventures of Margery Allingham as by Julia Jones (2009). Traitor's Purse (1941: US title The Sabotage Murder Mystery). The Casebook of Mr Campion (1947: short stories).

More Work for the Undertaker. A vintage murder mystery. Nestled along the Adriatic coastline, the kingdom of Averna has suddenly - and suspiciously - become the hottest property in Europe, and Albert Campion is given the task of recovering the long-missing proofs of ownership.

Published in 1941, Traitor’s Purse is a wartime masterpiece (The Guardian). Uncommonly exciting stuff, replete with Allingham’s skill in story-building and the plausible characters that make her as much a fine novelist as a mystery writer

Published in 1941, Traitor’s Purse is a wartime masterpiece (The Guardian). Uncommonly exciting stuff, replete with Allingham’s skill in story-building and the plausible characters that make her as much a fine novelist as a mystery writer. The New Republic Margery Allingham stands out like a shining light. And she has another quality, not usually associated with crime stories, elegance. Thriller & Crime Private Investigators Historical Detectives. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Margery Allingham -The New Republic Margery Allingham stands out like a shining light.

The New Republic Margery Allingham stands out like a shining light. Agatha Christie Читать весь отзыв.

Margery Allingham was one of the highly reputed authors from England, who was famous for writing books based on the mystery and thriller genres

Hardcover Paperback Kindle. Margery Allingham was one of the highly reputed authors from England, who was famous for writing books based on the mystery and thriller genres. She was best remembered as an English author of golden age detective fiction novels, especially for the stories featuring the sleuth named Albert Campion. Author Margery was born as Margery Louise Allingham in Ealing, London, on May 20, 1904. She belonged to a family that totally involved in literature. Both her parents, Emily Jane and Herbert were both writers.

Well! How to write review of this book without putting out spoilers for this truly magnificent piece of work by Allingham?

Let’s see--what can I see without giving it all away? This is indeed a Campion story, but a Campion we have not seen before--a Campion lacking most of his usual qualities and resources, on the wrong side of the law, running for his life and all the while knowing that there is some supremely important task impending, that the fate of the nation is involved, and that there is a definite but not well-defined deadline that only he can carry out--if he only knew what it was! We do have the presence of the staunchly loyal Lugg, as well as the unflinching support of of Lady Amanda Fitton, neither of whom quite realize the exact nature of the Campion they are dealing with here. We are used to a Campion playing things close to his vest with an enigmatic plan for victory of which he is confident. But that is not the Campion we see here.

Allingham has presented us with a tour de force of writing at a blindingly brilliant level, even for her. I could barely stand to put it down. It does not seem possible, but with this book Allingham has surpassed herself

About star ratings: it seems to me we see rather a lot of 5-star ratings, so that when something extraordinary comes along, like this book, we are left with no way to indicate that. If I could, I would have rated this at 5 1/2 stars, at least.
Traitor's Purse is a remarkable wartime novel. Depersonalizing Campion from the opening paragraph onward allows MA to re-create him as someone more sympathetic and engaging than the familiar aristocratic detective. Though the final chapters are breathlessly melodramatic, the period (England in 1940) and the crisis seem to justify the outsized passion.
This was my first exposure to Albert Campion and although I started with book #7 I didn't feel lost. Perhaps it helped that the main character was lost himself, having lost a great part of his memory in an uncertain accident. The main character is a likable sort, who is doing his best to complete an unknown task that may well affect the future of England during the war. Supporting characters are colorful and likable. I will definitely go in search of additional Campion novels.
A stranger wakes up in a hospital with no memory of his identity. He overhears a nurse talking to a policeman and discovers he is wanted for murder. He escapes down the hall, dresses himself in some fire protection gear and makes for the exit. In the confusion of the alarm he sets off, he manages to escape, steals a car, and heads off into the night...to a formal dinner.
And so begins "Traitor's Purse," another in the long series of Albert Campion adventure/mystery stories. Campion, handicapped by a memory that is only partially functional, must discover what horrible plot he had uncovered and how to stop it. All he remembers is that it involves the august Bridge Institute where some of England's most important war research is done. When the first person he meets with is promptly murdered and the second, a beautiful woman named Amanda, tells him she wants to break of their engagement, Campion finds himself facing insurmountable odds.
But face them he does. With a bit of fakery and the aid of the beautiful Amanda, Campion gradually makes headway. Leaving a trail of brutalized policemen and baffled menservants Campion manages to hide from his pursuit while uncovering the mystery. In doing so, he must face everything from muscle to madness, and live to talk about it.
I am not generally a fan of the 'lost memory' plot device. While "Traitor's Purse" is not my favorite Allingham tale, she manages make good use of Campion's disability and keeps the action and mystery churning. In addition, Amanda (who originally appeared in "The Fear Sign") provides a unique romantic twist that is unusual in a Campion story. Lugg does a fine job in his appearances as well. In truth, my only issue is that a Campion who doesn't remember who he is, isn't quite as much fun as one who does.
In truth, there's nothing to be grumpy about. "Traitor's Purse" is actually a finely crafted tale, with many twists and turns. Because Campion's character is somewhat suppressed, Allingham spends more time than usual developing the other denizens of the institute and it's surroundings, much to the reader's delight.
This is probably now my favorite Campion book, which I never expected to happen. Especially when he's acting so unlike himself, on account of HAVING AMNESIA. Somehow it manages to really highlight what he's normally like and how wrong his behavior is now and how dangerous the situation is... it all gets unbelievably tense. And of course Allingham was just a phenomenal writer. Just a really really really good book.
a very original premise for a Campion mystery...Albert has lost his memory because of a blow to the head but knows that he has a very important task to perform, one that is vital to the War effort. how he puts all the pieces together, without letting anyone know his problem makes for exciting (and slightly nerve wracking) reading. the pas de deux with Campion and Amanda continues....
Lured by AS Byatt's great praise, I read this book, spending less time puzzling out the spy mystery than puzzling out why the novel drew such praise from an accomplished writer who has read this novel multiple times. I have no idea what Byatt sees here. Those of us who enjoy 1930s and 1940s spy and crime films and novels, and even enjoy Charlie Chan and noir B-movies now and then as period pieces, are not put off by tropes that are today complete cliches (like amnesia, overheard conversations, and essential coincidences), but they cripple this novel. An English spy novel written in 1941 can be forgiven for positing an enormous, elaborate Nazi secret operation -- but the one here is so ridiculous, and its preparation is so impossible to do or to hide, that the novel seems ludicrous. Even 1941 readers would expect such a plot to be thwarted (no alarmism or defeatism would be published), reducing some suspense, so our later knowledge of how the war progressed is not the problem.