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The Murders of Richard III epub

by Elizabeth Peters


The Murders of Richard III epub

ISBN: 0396069363

ISBN13: 978-0396069362

Author: Elizabeth Peters

Category: Thriller and Mystery

Subcategory: Mystery

Language: English

Publisher: Dodd Mead; First Edition edition (June 1, 1974)

Pages: 244 pages

ePUB book: 1823 kb

FB2 book: 1790 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 451

Other Formats: txt lit lrf mbr





As for the more modern goings-on, they were certainly amusing enough to hold my interest.

Jacqueline Kirby, retired librarian and avid devotee of King Richard III, is invited to an English country house for a weekend to assist in clearing that king's name of the crimes attached to it. However, a practical joker thinks to enliven the proceedings with recreations of 15th century murder methods and one of the jokes proves fatal.

The Murders of Richard III Get ready to enter the spellbinding and incomparable world of New York Times bestselling author Elizabeth Peters. lls from the reigning queen of adventure!MoreLess Show More Show Less.

In a remote English manor house, modern admirersof the much-maligned King Richard III-one of Shakespeare's most extraordinary villains-are gathered for a grand weekend of dress-up and make-believe murder. But the fun ends when the masquerade turns more sinister. Jacqueline Kirby, an American librarian on hand for the festivities, suddenly finds herself in the center of strange, dark doings. and racing to untangle a murderous puzzle before history repeats itself in exceptionally macabre ways. Thriller & Crime Women Sleuths

In a remote English manor house, modern admirersof the much-maligned King Richard III-one of Shakespeare's most extraordinary villains-are gathered for a grand weekend of. .Books related to The Murders of Richard III. Skip this list.

Peters, Elizabeth - - The Murders of Richard III (v. ).

Under the pseudonym Elizabeth Peters, Mertz published her Amelia . In the first book, The Seventh Sinner, Jacqueline is an unwilling detective.

Under the pseudonym Elizabeth Peters, Mertz published her Amelia Peabody historical mystery series, using a nom de plume drawn from the names of her two children  . The series continued with The Murders of Richard III and Die For Love; the latter featured Jacqueline wearing increasingly outrageous costumes and launching a career as a romance novelist.

Historically, Richard III has been depicted as the hunchback tyrant who viciously . One of the funnest parts of The Murders of Richard III is how self-aware and meta it is.

Historically, Richard III has been depicted as the hunchback tyrant who viciously killed his way to the throne, including his two young nephews. But that depiction has been argued to be based purely on Tudor propaganda to reinforce Henry Tudor’s claim to the throne after Richard’s demise in battle. Around that time, I saw several posts recommending two older books that talk about Ricardians and the historical image of Richard III: The Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey and The Murders of Richard III by Elizabeth Peters.

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In a remote English manor house, modern admirers of the much-maligned King Richard IIIâ?one of Shakespeare's most extraordinary villainsâ?are gathered for a grand weekend of dress-up and make-believe murder. But the fun ends when the masquerade turns more sinister . . . and deadly. Jacqueline Kirby, an American librarian on hand for the festivities, suddenly finds herself in the center of strange, dark doings . . . and racing to untangle a murderous puzzle before history repeats itself in exceptionally macabre ways.

I love every story Elizabeth Peters wrote that includes Jacqueline Kirby! Jacqueline is a character and a half and there are days when I wish I was just like her.

In this story, Jacqueline goes to a house party with a theme of the historical people around Richard the Third. The king is murdered once again and it is up to Jacqueline to figure it out.
I've read The Daughter of Time and when I was reading about Josephine Tey, this book was mentioned. I've been reading mysteries for a very long time and I have read several of the Amelia Peabody books.

The characters are interesting and there is enough action so that it takes some time to sort through the cast of characters to figure out the who and the why and to also understand the motivation and the real reason why the events were escalating.

All on all, it was an enjoyable read and there was enough action to keep the pages turning.
An entertaining re-hash of the arguments in favor of King Richard III not being as black as he's been painted, served up as an "English Country House Mystery". A group of disparate characters have gathered in a somewhat isolated house, for a meeting of an offshoot of the Richard the Third Society. Mayhem and deaths ensue. The case in favor of Richard isn't as fully presented as in Josephine Tey's "The Daughter of Time", but some good points are made. Made somewhat more current by the fact that Richard's skeleton was recently unearthed in Leicester.
Elizabeth Peters is going to be missed by this reader. She always blends mystery, history and some humor into her writing which keeps the reader fascinated, entertained and informed through each of her novels. I loved Amelia Peabody, Vicky Bliss, and Jacqueline Kirby is my new favorite character. The stories always help to expand my interest in her subject matter. I'm a life-long learner, so the background knowledge displayed in her books adds so much interest in my ongoing quest for knowledge.
Light, entertaining read. Classic Elizabeth Peters. Recommended!
I will say that a reader should be aware of the historical controversy surrounding King Richard III of England in order to get full benefit of this mystery. However, it is a fun read....a bit like reading a grown-up Nancy Drew book. I would gladly pick up another Elizabeth Peters book for sheer guilty pleasure reading. The writing is clever in a way that only Brits can do, and there is not the usual gore found in so many of today's plots.
Josephine Tey used the delightful idea of of having modern people judge the character of Richard III by his melancholy portrait and then wove Richard's story into the modern plot, a mystery within a mystery, in her marvelous "The Daughter of Time." The gimmick is used again in Peters' "The Murders of Richard III"but it was already old hat in 1974 when this book was written. It's not Peters' fault, of course, that the guesswork about Richard's physical appearance is no longer guesswork. We have his skeleton with the backbone's severe scoliosis and we can accurately judge that one of Richard's shoulders was higher than the other but under his clothes the slight deformity would not be noticed. Peters mentions the higher shoulder but we've come a long way in our information about Richard since she wrote the book. Nevertheless, all told, Peters' novel does not compare with "The Daughter of Time" which has remained on the list of the 10 best mysteries of all time. The trouble is, if you've read them both you can't help comparing them and "The Murders of Richard III" comes up wanting.

The meeting of guests in a stately home where of course a murder will occur has been done a million times and I have to admit I do love that genre, but I found Peters' novel to be contrived with the plot being wrenched to fit Richard's life and times and at the same time fracturing any credulity. The whole enchilada is too much of a muchness. (Pardon mixed metaphors).

Britisher Thomas Carter invites Sleuth Jacqueline Kirby to a Ricardian party while she is visiting England. All the guests portray a character in Richard III's life complete with an appropriate costume. There are a lot of players and we have to remember not only their real names but the name of the character he or she is impersonating. As a special treat host Richard Weldon promises to reveal a long lost letter purporting to completely clear Richard of the murder of his nephews, the Princes in the Tower.

To add spice and eventually terror to the Ricardian party a practical joker begins staging the deaths of the various role playing contemporaries of Richard. The pranks are very complex such as the re-creation of the Duke of Clarence's death by drowning in a butt of Malmsey (Madeira) wine. Poor "Clarence" (aka Thomas Carter)is hoisted up with the pulley with his head above (luckily) an empty wine barrel. Like the other victims he is knocked senseless by the prankster so the joker can't be identified. Other types of popular executions such as smothering and beheading are staged, and eventually one caper goes too far with a resultant close fatality. How the prankster manages to put together exceedingly complex scenes involving one Ricardian role player each time stretches the credulity of the reader.

Jacqueline Kirby as a character isn't realistic either. She has flaming red hair, emerald green eyes. is sexy, quick with the repartee, a highly knowledgeable librarian who often puts on her glasses, the author telling you each time. Apparently Peters feels the glasses give added weight to Jacqueline's brain and she is not just another pretty face.

This mystery is interesting enough to keep your interest but I feel it is Josephine Tey lite. IMHO Elizabeth Peters made a large mistake using Tey's premise of fitting Richard's life into a modern situation. The whole thing doesn't quite gel.
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