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The Drowning Pool epub

by Ross MacDonald


The Drowning Pool epub

ISBN: 0553241354

ISBN13: 978-0553241358

Author: Ross MacDonald

Category: Thriller and Mystery

Subcategory: Mystery

Language: English

Publisher: Bantam Books (July 1, 1975)

ePUB book: 1780 kb

FB2 book: 1321 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 200

Other Formats: docx txt doc mobi





Ross Macdonald’s real name was Kenneth Millar. Books by ross macdonald.

Ross Macdonald’s real name was Kenneth Millar. Born near San Francisco in 1915 and raised in Vancouver, British Columbia, Millar returned to the . as a young man and published his first novel in 1944. He served as the president of the Mystery Writers of America and was awarded their Grand Master Award, as well as the Mystery Writers of Great Britain’s Silver Dagger Award.

The Drowning Pool is a difficult novel for me to recommend. From the first scene between Archer and his client RMcD lays a heavy hand on his usually much more deft touch

The Drowning Pool is a difficult novel for me to recommend. From the first scene between Archer and his client RMcD lays a heavy hand on his usually much more deft touch. Detective and client, the true innocents in the book, engage in the usual hard-boiled banter but it's very strained and a almost cruel on Archer's part.

The Drowning Pool is Ross Macdonald's gripping tale of adultery, jealousy, murder and lies. Ross Macdonald's Lew Archer mysteries rewrote the conventions of the detective novel with their credible, humane hero, and with Macdonald's insight and moral complexity won new literary respectability for the hardboiled genre previously pioneered by Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler. They have also received praise from such celebrated writers as William Goldman, Jonathan Kellerman, Eudora Welty and Elmore Leonard.

Ross Macdonald is the pseudonym of the American-Canadian writer of crime fiction Kenneth Millar. Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Ross Macdonald's books.

The Drowning Pool is a 1950 mystery novel by American writer Ross Macdonald, his second book in the series revolving around the cases of private detective Lew Archer. Archer is hired by a woman to investigate a libellous letter she received. The family lives in the house situated on the line between two Southern Californian towns, one an idyllic, oil-rich town and the other the small, seedy town from which the oil comes, corrupt and destroyed by the industry.

The Drowning Pool I'd kill myself if I had my mother's courage. The Drowning Pool - La Toile d araignée (film, 1975) Pour les articles homonymes, voir La Toile d araignée.

Author: Ross Macdonald. When a millionaire matriarch is found floating face-down in the family pool, the prime suspects are her good-for-nothing son and his seductive teenage daughter. In The Drowning Pool, Lew Archer takes this case in the . suburbs and encounters a moral wasteland of corporate greed and family hatred-and sufficient motive for a dozen murders.

In The Drowning Pool, Lew Archer takes this case in the . Published in 1965, 1963, and 1950, respectively, this trio feature Macdonald’s hard-boiled private detective Lew Archer. From Library Journal. The plots involve murder, deceit, blackmail, sex, and all those other goodies that make for great crime stories.

Электронная книга "The Drowning Pool", Ross Macdonald. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Drowning Pool" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Fontana 1975 film tie-in edition paperback vg book In stock shipped from our UK warehouse
I came to Lew Archer via the Kindle Daily Deal. They had The Galton Case up for about $2.99. For those new to the series it's the 8th book in the series. I was seriously WOWED by that book and so much so that I wanted to start the Lew Archer series, from the beginning. Despite what others have said about the first and previous novel to this one (The Moving Target, I loved it! Many believe he just wasn't up to his later excellence but if that's considered one of the worst, along with this one, then I cannot imagine how incredible the others are.

Compared to the first book, this one is even better, stylistically. You can actually see the improvement in his descriptive writing. Yes, he appears to be influenced by Chandler/Hammett, but the style is definitely his own. I thoroughly enjoy his approach to humor. It is quite subtle, and it's very dry. His vocabulary is what I really like. Much of his words are, according to Kindle's on-board dictionary, "archaic" but that is what makes it fun. Learning what these things are. I say: let's bring 'em back!

The only real problem I have is in his characterization. You can see that MacDonald doesn't really understand women, very well. The ending is deflating and unrealistic. Naturally this is fiction, so of course it's unrealistic, but what I mean is there is something one does in the book that characteristically speaking, would never would ever have done. That bothers me. I would love to discuss this and see what others think. If you know of a place online where we can do this, please let me know in the comments.

Also, a previous review mentions the harshness of Archer's treatment of his client, in the beginning. I was disappointed as well. Perhaps though that is a demonstration of his growth by the end of the novel. Whatever it was, it was a bit off putting but not a serious problem for me.

Is it worth the read? I think so. Just be prepared for a bizarre ending that seems wrong. It's not a bad ending, mind you. There are other things that are rather fascinating. It's just the one thing that bothers me and I refuse to spoil it for anyone. For this reason, that being that the ending is entertaining on the detecting side.
The Drowning Pool is a difficult novel for me to recommend. From the first scene between Archer and his client RMcD lays a heavy hand on his usually much more deft touch. Detective and client, the true innocents in the book, engage in the usual hard-boiled banter but it's very strained and a almost cruel on Archer's part. The rest of the novel follows this trend through stranger and stranger twists and turns--none of these plot elements making any more sense than the initial verbal combat at the novel's start.

There are a lot of good things about the book--it is RMcD, after all--but this book carries weight and losses that ultimately don't really add up. MacDonald writes with a thesaurus not a dictionary at hand (for example, how many ways do you want to learn to describe erectile dysfunction, including Latin, and ED doesn't really play that much of a role in the story or character motivation).

This is the last realistic of the Archer novel's I've read so far. That doesn't make it bad, and it's exponentially better than 99.9 percent of our contemporary detective fiction, it just doesn't make it the best Ross MacDonald.
MacDonald gives you a fascinating mystery and clever characters, dialog and insights to enjoy along the way. You can't get a better deal.
This and other Ross Mcdonald novels of the era are wonderful tales about the cases of a PI in the late '40's and early '50's in Southern California. They provide a wonderful sociological over of the life and times of this bygone time. Readers of genres other than the PI/mystery tale will also find his stories entertaining, educational and at times downright hysterically funny.
I have been a fan of Ross MacDonald's Lew Archer series for decades and have re-read all the books in the series many times. I have been working my way through them again, in publication order, this time on my Kindle. The novels are as great as ever and I still enjoy them. But the Kindle editions are full of typographical errors. Some are random (e.g., he/she confusion), some are repetitive - not just within a books - from book to book (e.g., a car referred to as a "Chewy" rather than "Chevy". This is a minor annoyance and does not significantly detract from these great novels. But it does seem to imply that the publisher considers them "pulp" rather than serious novels. That strikes me as disrespectful to both the author (who is a recognized master) and the reader (who paid full price for these books).

I've put this review under this book because it is the first in the series. But my comments apply to all the books in the Lew Archer series. The books are all very good. But the Kindle editions all contain typos.
One of the best crime authors ever - his description of 'everyday' items is beautifully expressed..and the bits of humor interjected make his collection one of my favorites - EVERYONE should at least check him out.
Another excellent shorty from a classic noir author. Love all his stories and this one has all the usual twists and turns and family intrigues.

DP Lyle, Award-winning author of the Jake Longly, Dub Walker, and Samantha Cody thriller series.
Top notch mystery full of noir feel. Ross McDonald is the 1950s noir master.