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The Singing of the Dead epub

by Marguerite Gavin,Dana Stabenow


The Singing of the Dead epub

ISBN: 0736668535

ISBN13: 978-0736668538

Author: Marguerite Gavin,Dana Stabenow

Category: Thriller and Mystery

Subcategory: Mystery

Language: English

Publisher: Books on Tape; Unabridged edition (April 2001)

ePUB book: 1446 kb

FB2 book: 1591 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 291

Other Formats: lrf lit mobi azw





Dana Stabenow is the New York Times bestselling author of the Kate Shugak . I miss that with audiobooks

Dana Stabenow is the New York Times bestselling author of the Kate Shugak mysteries and the Liam Campbell mysteries, as well as a few science fiction and thriller novels. Her book A Cold Day for Murder won an Edgar Award in 1994. I miss that with audiobooks. Yet I missed Marguerite Gavin's voice, bringing Kate and her world alive in my ear. I'll be doing the rest of the series as audiobooks.

Reader Marguerite Gavin has a sonorous voice, rich and full of emotion; she easily delivers the wry humor that is so much a part of a Kate Shugak book. Gavin moves smoothly from accent to accent without hesitation, recalling multiple characters perfectly and bringing to life a main character you wouldn't mind being snowed in with for a few days. c) AudioFile 2001, Portland, Maine. Book pak, Books on Tape, 2001.

The political setting for "The Singing Of The Dead" provides a great vehicle .

The most uplifting part of the book was the way in which the Park Rats and even State Trooper Jim Chopin come together to support Kate in protecting Jack Morgan's son from his mother. I'll be doing the rest of the series as audibooks.

Dana Stabenow (Author), Marguerite Gavin (Reader). I met Dana Stabenow several years ago while visiting my daughter and family in Homer, Ak. I Bought one of her books, that she then graciously signed, and I became a immediate fan. Book 3 of 22 in the Kate Shugak Novels Series.

Women could do so much better, selling dances for a dollar, a pint of champagne for eighteen dollars, an hour in one of the rooms upstairs for considerably more

Singing of the dead, . Women could do so much better, selling dances for a dollar, a pint of champagne for eighteen dollars, an hour in one of the rooms upstairs for considerably more. Big Ben got fifty cents on the dance dollar, three-quarters of the price of the pint of champagne, and she never told anyone what the split was on the third. She had been headlining there for the past year, specializing on stage in the Flame Dance that kept two hundred yards of chiffon in the air at one time, and specializing in what one reporter called the long, juicy waltz in the clubrooms upstairs.

Categories: Contemporary Fiction. The Singing of the Dead. By (author) Dana Stabenow, Narrator Marguerite Gavin. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

The political setting for "The Singing Of The Dead" provides a great vehicle for . I did like how Dana Stabenow blended the story of the Dawson Darling into the current political situation.

I miss that with audiobooks.

Dana Stabenow, read by Marguerite Gavin. Dana Stabenow is the New York Times bestselling author of the Kate Shugak mysteries and the Liam Campbell mysteries, as well as a few science fiction and thriller novels. Stabenow was born in Anchorage, Alaska and raised on a 75-foot fish tender in the Gulf of Alaska. in journalism and an . in writing from the University of Alaska. She has worked as an egg counter and bookkeeper for a seafood company, and worked on the TransAlaska pipeline before becoming a full-time writer.

The Singing of the Dead. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline. Kate Shugak joins the staff of a political campaign to work security for a Native woman running for state senator

The brothers Grosdidier are the farthest thing from gentle souls, but as EMTs, they're the closest thing The Park has to doctors. Living together in the state of chaotic disarray that is the bachelor's birthright, they little suspect the fate that others are preparing for them. Kate Shugak joins the staff of a political campaign to work security for a Native woman running for state senator. The candidate has been receiving anonymous threats, and Kate is to become her shadow, watching the crowds at rallies and fund-raisers.

(11TH IN KATE SHUGAK SERIES)

In THE SINGING OF THE DEAD, Kate Shugak hires onto the staff of a political campaign to work security for a Native woman running for state senator. The candidate has been receiving anonymous threats and Kate, who went to college with two of the staffers, is to become her shadow, watching the crowds at rallies and fund-raisers. But just as she's getting started, the campaign is rocked by the murder of their staff researcher. In order to track the killer, Kate will have to retrace the researcher's steps and delve into the past, in particular the grisly murder of a "good-time girl" during the Klondike Gold Rush of 1915. Little can she guess the impact a ninety-year-old unsolved case could have on a modern-day killer.

I am nearly half way through the Kate Shugak series and I really like them a lot. I love Shugak, and hats off to Stabenow for creating such a terrific character. The Alsaka setting "inside the park" is a mighty character in itself. Every entry in the series is a complete book -- no cliffhangers here! This one combined the plot with some early history and it was meticulously plotted. I loved the back story of the Dawson Darling and my only problem was that those segments are in italics. Italics are annoying; especially in long passages, but I persevered because I really liked that character and was rooting for her all the way. The ending was stunning, with Kate finding what was written on Angel's tomb stone. BTW, the last sentence is NOT a spoiler because having lived in the late 1800's and very early 1900's she obviously is now dead. Anyway, it was a fun read and a great story. I'm looking forward to #12.
Unlike many of the Kate Shugak stories, this one has less to do with life in the Alaska Bush and more to do with state and local politics. The politics are not entirely unlike political campaigning in very small town continental America, with potlucks diners, gymnasium, etc. Kate works security for a political campaign that turns deadly. The emotional tension between Kate and Jim Chopin carries over from the previous story and is so thick you'd need a chainsaw to slice it. The side story about Johnny Morgan continues, and there is also a side story from a different time period, early 1900's gold rush Alaska and a murder. It's a fascinating bit of history. Each time I read a Kate Shugak mystery, I think it is one of the best so far, and this one is no exception.
"The Singing Of The Dead" is my least favorite of the Kate Shugak novels so far. It delivered a good plot, some strong characters and a few excellent scenes but I couldn't become as emotionally engaged with this novel as with the others.

Kate, still recovering from the loss of Jack Morgan, is not her usual self in this book. She is more passive than usual and perhaps a little more vulnerable. I applaud this in terms of character development but it left a hole in the book that no-one else filled. Kate was far more damaged in "Midnight Come Again" but there Jim Chopin filled the gap.

I was also out of sympathy with the "historical" parts of the story which were bleakly accurate. Each passage was well written but I struggled to overcome my aversion for the brutality of the period.I also found the passages hard to integrate into the present-day story. There was a plot link but not much more.

Of course, as with any Kate Shugak novel, there were some wonderful scenes: the broadcast and interview from the chaos of Bobby's house, the atmosphere and content of the political meeting in the school gym and the peculiar auction that kicks off the book.

The political setting for "The Singing Of The Dead" provides a great vehicle for reviewing the Alaska's political issues and the factions that work on them. I thought the speeches, given by plausible politicians competing for votes, were particularly well done.

The most uplifting part of the book was the way in which the Park Rats and even State Trooper Jim Chopin come together to support Kate in protecting Jack Morgan's son from his mother. This kind of practical support for the vulnerable is a constant theme in Dana Stabenow's books and she always does it well.

In the end, my main reaction to the book turned out to be sadness: for the treatment of Angel Beachem in the Gold rush and for the violence done to the researcher who brought her story to life.

This is the only Kate Shugak book not available from audible.com. I gave up waiting for them to add it to their catalog and went with the ebook version instead. This was my first ebook. I was pleasantly surprised at how natural it felt to read this way and how easy it was to move about. I miss that with audiobooks. Yet I missed Marguerite Gavin's voice, bringing Kate and her world alive in my ear. I'll be doing the rest of the series as audiobooks.
The great thing about any sort of series is that if you enjoyed a part of it, there is still more waiting. Dana Stabenow's Kate Shugak series is one of those that from the first will have you wanting more. As always, I would encourage the reader to get the full list and start with the first, "A Cold Day for Murder." I think you will be hooked from the first chapter and it isn't just because Kate is an Aleut women living in Alaska with a half wolf named Mutt for a companion. Which brings me to another of the main characters - Alaska. I've spent more time on Google Earth, pouring over maps, and following the Iditarod than I ever expected to. Now, 60 years later, I'm rereading "Call of the Wild."
Kate's story and that of her life in an Alaska park where she is the perfect "crime solver" now covers 20 books and like her many other followers, I'm eagerly awaiting the next. If you are a mystery lover and many are starting to seem "old hat", The Kate Shugak series will be the perfect fix.
I love all the Kate Shugak novels. I read this a while back, but I can assure you that if you like learning about Alaska, cherish character development and love a rip roaring adventure, you can't go wrong with any of Stabenow's Kate Shugak series. I read them in order though, to get the full impact because there is a chronology to them.
Like all of Ms. Stabenow's novels about Kaye Shugak this one ends with you wanting more and more. The book is another great tale of adventure for Kate and company.