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Winter at Death's Hotel epub

by Kenneth Cameron


Winter at Death's Hotel epub

ISBN: 1409132706

ISBN13: 978-1409132707

Author: Kenneth Cameron

Category: Thriller and Mystery

Subcategory: Mystery

Language: English

Publisher: Orion Hardbacks; Digital original edition (2012)

Pages: 400 pages

ePUB book: 1674 kb

FB2 book: 1239 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 883

Other Formats: lrf docx lit txt





Winter at Death's Hotel book.

Winter at Death's Hotel book. New York, January 1896  .

Kenneth Cameron is the author of three novels featuring Denton, THE FRIGHTENED MAN, THE BOHEMIAN GIRL and THE SECOND WOMAN as well as of plays staged in Britain and the US, and the award-winning Africa on Film: Beyond Black and White. He lives part of the year in northern New York State and part in the southern US.

Praise for Winter at Death's Hotel "e;Louisa is a fascinating creatio. onan Doyle's wife is a clever choice as the novel's central character, embodying the fears and aspirations of women of the period, and the ingenious plot does not diminish the horrors she has to confront. e;-Sunday Times (UK) "e;A well-realized mystery. that shows promise for future books in the series. e;-Sunday Business Post (UK). To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Kenneth Cameron keeps the plot moving along, and is talented enough writer to create a world where what a proper English married lady sees and experiences is overwhelming and utterly believable. The New York Journal of Books. An enjoyable, change-of-pace mystery with a marvelous, entertaining, and determined main character. I think a lot of my enjoyment of this novel came from Cameron's writing style

She had lain awake much of the night, partly because of her ankle and partly because of the two awful policemen. The truth was, she admitted to the darkness, they had frightened her.

She had lain awake much of the night, partly because of her ankle and partly because of the two awful policemen. And they had frightened her with their threat-and yes, it had been a threat-to put her in the newspapers. That would be horrible for Arthur, even unbearable

The very best service and tone, the hotel management asserted - service and tone and taste. Good taste, of course, the best taste, matched by hotels like the Criterion in London, as the service and tone were perhaps matched by Brown’s. Most certainly, if you were English and of a certain sort, you stayed at the New Britannic when you were in New York.

And don't miss THE FRIGHTENED MAN - the first book in Kenneth Cameron's gripping Denton crime mysteries featuring an amateur sleuth you'll never forget.

by Kenneth M. Cameron. Part historical fiction, part psychological thriller, Cameron's work is all page-turner. Arthur Conan Doyle, the renowned created of Sherlock Holmes, arrives with his wife Louisa at the Britannic Hotel in New York for his first American tour.

Kenneth Cameron achieves something very special with the style of Winter at Death’s Hotel. Louisa is an admirable guide through the maze of 1890s’ polite society, through the pitfalls of a happy upper middle class marriage, and, ultimately, through a terrible sequence of events

Arthur Conan Doyle, the renowned creator of Sherlock Holmes, arrives at the Britannic Hotel with his wife, Louisa, ready to begin his first American tour.

ISBN: 978-1-409-10958-7; Издательство: Orion. Arthur Conan Doyle, the renowned creator of Sherlock Holmes, arrives at the Britannic Hotel with his wife, Louisa, ready to begin his first American tour. While he prepares his lectures, Louisa becomes mesmerised by this brash, vibrant, dangerous city, especially when a woman's brutally butchered corpse is found in a Bowery alley and Louisa is convinced from the artist's sketch in the paper that she'd seen the victim at the hotel.

New York, January 1896. Arthur Conan Doyle, the renowned creator of Sherlock Holmes, arrives at the Britannic Hotel with his wife, Louisa, ready to begin his first American tour. While he prepares his lectures, Louisa becomes mesmerised by this brash, vibrant, dangerous city, especially when a woman's brutally butchered corpse is found in a Bowery alley and Louisa is convinced from the artist's sketch in the paper that she'd seen the victim at the hotel. Arthur is patronisingly skeptical about her womanly 'fantasies' but when she sprains her ankle and is forced to remain at the hotel while Arthur goes on tour, Louisa cannot resist pursuing her intuitions. And when more bodies start appearing, she's convinced that she holds the key to the killings. With the help of the hotel's hard-bitten detective and an ambitious female news reporter, Louisa starts to piece together a story of madness, murder and depravity - a story that leads inexorably back to the hotel itself, the strange story of its unique construction and a madman who is watching her every move.
My feelings about this book changed many times over the course of reading it. At times it was interesting, at times it dragged, at times it was a thrill ride, and at one point overly graphic and violent. I enjoy historical fiction and the author did a good job with scene and character development. Briefly, this is the story of Arthur Conan Doyle's wife Louisa and their first trip to NYC. She becomes interested and embroiled in the case of a serial killer. There is a secondary story of police corruption, featuring Teddy Roosevelt's attempt to clean up the department. Both stories are interesting. However, I think the book The Alienist has a more balanced portrayal of Roosevelt and the police department. Louisa is a great character, complex and modern. The book ends very abruptly. I like a book that does not tie up all the loose ends, but this really leaves you hanging with no questions answered. Perhaps there are plans for a sequel. My other complaint is the graphic language and violence toward the end of the book. This is not something that typically bothers me, but here it seemed out of place. It seemed like the author was trying too hard to be shocking. Despite the three star rating, I would read another book with Louisa Doyle as the heroine.
I just finished this book last night and while I thoroughly enjoyed it, the ending left me with more questions than answers and the abruptness of it left me scratching my head. I really hope this author is continuing with the story of Louisa Doyle, if not, then I will be disappointed.

Other than the ending, I really liked this book. It was pretty face-paced and I enjoyed the historical aspects of the book. Most of what I read is murder mysteries and historical fiction so when an author ties the two together I can't help but buy it.

I would surely recommend this book however, beware of the ending. Like I said, it is abrupt and I am unsure if the author just stopped writing or if he left it that way to open up for a series. Also, the murder scenes are a little graphic and there is some foul language.

If it weren't for the ending I would've given ths book 5 stars.
A story of the late 1800 era, a fussy older husband famous for his Sherlock Holmes stories, his 28 year old wife who is like a grown up Nancy Drew, and a luxury hotel that holds some secrets. The story of the English couple`s trip to New York is very entertaining, funny, and even hysterically funny. But then unimaginable crimes of horror and more horror made me think about not reading on. Well, I did and had a fit of nightmares. Gruesome, grisly, fiendish sexual perversion. I do appreciate the authors talent. He especially got the language of that period right like "convenience" for toilet and "fountain pen". I would like to read another book by him if I knew for sure there would be no horror.
This book has not kept my interest as some mysteries have. I would not purchase this book again. The plot is of a couple traveling to America to do a lecture tour. She injures her leg and cannot travel. He goes on the lecture tour. Prior to his leaving a woman was brutally assaulted and killed. She thinks she recognized the woman in the hotel on the day they checked in. In spite of his instructing her to not become involved, she does so after he leaves on the tour. Twists and turns, pages turn...I have not finished it yet, but am compelled to find out how she goes about solving this mystery.
I had a hard time getting into the story. Once or twice I thought about quitting it and reading something else but I persevered and am glad I did. As I continued to read I became more and more immersed in the plot and the characters. Turns out to be a very good story, good mystery, with well developed characters.
Only drawback is the author doesn't have a whole lot of respect for Roosevelt and I do. So I disagree with how he was portrayed.
One of my favorite books of the past was The Alienist, and this reminded me of that novel on many different levels. i read a lot of contemporary spy thrillers interspered with serial killers, police procedurals, literary and historical fiction, and this book combined most of them in a compelling, well-told story with lots of period detail and twists and turns along the way. And yes, I was surprised at the ending.

Definitely a page turner, grisly but with touches of Hitchcockian humor, it was a most interesting and enjoyable read.. (The main character reminded me a bit of Amelia Peabody.)
An intriguing story with a novel point of view and more character complexity than in the usual mystery. I have to admit that I didn't have high expectation when I began the book, but was happily compelled forward page after page. Loved the historic detail that was skillfully woven into the plot. I will be looking for more from Cameron.
This book is well researched. It gives an authentic description of New York city in the late 1800's- the people, buildings, and atmosphere. You are right there seeing, smelling, hearing, and feeling what the characters are going through. The story line is very intense and graphic; the genre is that of "Jack the Ripper". Now I'm anxious to read everything by Mr. Cameron.