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Hiking the Triple Crown : Appalachian Trail - Pacific Crest Trail - Continental Divide Trail - How to Hike America's Longest Trails epub

by Karen Berger


Hiking the Triple Crown : Appalachian Trail - Pacific Crest Trail - Continental Divide Trail - How to Hike America's Longest Trails epub

ISBN: 0898867606

ISBN13: 978-0898867602

Author: Karen Berger

Category: Sport

Subcategory: Mountaineering

Language: English

Publisher: Mountaineers Books (March 1, 2001)

Pages: 223 pages

ePUB book: 1114 kb

FB2 book: 1381 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 863

Other Formats: txt lrf docx mobi





The Continental Divide Trail is given more sparse coverage, because the trail is not yet completed and is not attempted by very many hikers, except the very bravest souls. Hiking the Triple Crown" is an awesome volume.

The Continental Divide Trail is given more sparse coverage, because the trail is not yet completed and is not attempted by very many hikers, except the very bravest souls. This book is recommended for people who are not in the immediate stages of planning a thru hike. If you're planning on tackling any of these trails, specific books on each individual trail is the way to go. There is too much general information here for those seriously considering a hike in the near future. If you're not familiar with any of America's three great Wilderness trails, this is a head-first dive into refreshing waters.

Hiking the Triple Crown book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Hiking the Triple Crown book. Hiking the triple crown. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Hiking the Triple Crown : Appalachian Trail - Pacific Crest Trail - Continental Divide Trail - How to Hike America's Longest Trails as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Triple Crown of Hiking informally refers to the three major . long-distance hiking trails: Pacific Crest Trail – 2,654 miles (4,270 km) long, Washington, Oregon, and California between Mexico and Canada following the highest portion of the Sierra Nevada and Cascade Range. Appalachian Trail – 2,184 miles (3,515 km), between Springer Mountain in Georgia and Mount Katahdin in Maine.

The Pacific Crest Trail, officially designated as the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail (PCT) is a long-distance hiking and equestrian trail closely aligned with the highest portion of the Sierra Nevada and Cascade mountain ranges, which lie 100 t. .

The Pacific Crest Trail, officially designated as the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail (PCT) is a long-distance hiking and equestrian trail closely aligned with the highest portion of the Sierra Nevada and Cascade mountain ranges, which lie 100 to 150 miles (160 to 240 km) east of the . The trail's southern terminus is on the .

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Hiking the Triple Crown : How to Hike America's Longest Trails: Appalachian Trail, Pacific Crest Trail .

Hiking the Triple Crown : How to Hike America's Longest Trails: Appalachian Trail, Pacific Crest Trail, Continental Divide Trail.

Library descriptions. The Appalachian Trail, Pacific Crest Trail and Continental Divide Trail-the so-called Triple Crown-have long captured the imaginations of thru-hikers and backpackers alike. For anyone dreaming of or planning a long-distance hiking endeavor, Hiking the Triple Crown is an must-have resource. With triple crown hiker Karen Berger as your expert guide, you'll find answers to your questions about long-distance hiking plus descriptions about what to expect along each of America's three longest trails.

How to Thru-Hike the Appalachian Trail. Everything an aspiring thru-hiker needs to know prior to embarking for a 2,200 mile journey from Georgia to Maine. Welcome to How to Thru-Hike the Appalachian Trail: A 101 Guide! This resource is designed to help you understand everything you need to know about thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail. Here you will find information regarding the trail and the culture that surrounds it, gear talk, thru-hike preparation, hiking strategies, social etiquette, and much, much more.

Thru-hiking long-distance trails is an incredible way to test your mental and .

Thru-hiking long-distance trails is an incredible way to test your mental and physical limits, as well as your ability to pack efficiently and effectively. The challenges of thru-hiking are many-coping with blisters, battling quick turns of weather, rationing out food and dealing with incredibly sore muscles-but the rewards are even greater. How about a crossing by foot? The coast-to-coast American Discovery Trail-the Mac Daddy of from the shores of Delaware to California’s Point Reyes National Seashore, one of the most wild and beautiful places along the California coast

No matter which trail you choose, the US Postal Service is in the process of closing many post offices. The AT may be the shortest of the Triple Crown trails, but it has the most elevation gain and loss of the three

No matter which trail you choose, the US Postal Service is in the process of closing many post offices. The 2012 guide books will likely go to print before all closures are announced so double check that any post offices you plan to use are still open in the spring. In addition to Yogi's guide, you may want to check out The Weathercarrot's PCT self-resupply information. The AT may be the shortest of the Triple Crown trails, but it has the most elevation gain and loss of the three. It was designed before trails were required to allow pack animals so is steeper and has fewer switchbacks. The foot bed itself is probably more rugged on average than the other two trails.

Although the maps give only a general idea of the trails described (the hiker will want buy detailed topographic maps and a more in-depth local guide when actually performing the hike), this book provides an appetite-whetting overview of the trails. It is most useful as a reference for the art of successfully hiking long trails. Berger (an author of several backpacking books) discusses the many details of good preparation in detail, including the dangers involved in long hikes, whether physical or environmental. The sidebar quotations by other authors reinforce her commonsense advice on how to pack light and stay dry. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
This is a fine overview of the three major hiking trails that criss-cross the United States. The major focus of the book is on the renowned Appalachian trail, with most of the text devoted to the AT. The Pacific Crest Trail has some useful information, though the chapters on this trail are shorter and less detailed. The Continental Divide Trail is given more sparse coverage, because the trail is not yet completed and is not attempted by very many hikers, except the very bravest souls.
This book is recommended for people who are not in the immediate stages of planning a thru hike. If you're planning on tackling any of these trails, specific books on each individual trail is the way to go. There is too much general information here for those seriously considering a hike in the near future. This book is fine as an overview and to give you a sample feel of each hike, but is less successful for one planning a hike in the coming year.
The writing is excellent and the book is riveting in sections. For all those obsessed with hiking any of the grand thru trails in America, this is an excellent and recommended resource.
Lots of great info
This book is a good beginner's guide to hiking long distances on three different trails in the U.S. Known as the Triple Crown of hiking, the trails are the Appalachian, the Pacific Rest, and the Continental Divide. The author covers basics such as how to pack, how much food will be needed per person for how many days, and such. She lists the various shelters and talks about shelter etiquette. Throughout the book are various photos of hikers, of individual shelters along the trails, of trail signs, bridge crossings, flowers, and the like. The photos help break up the text and make the information easier to access because few pages are top-to-bottom text -- sort of like hiking one of these trails day by day, knowing that some of them will be easy, some moderate, and some difficult. All in all, a very helpful guide.
Good read a little outdated
Very informative. not too detailed, an easy introduction to all three trails.
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"Hiking the Triple Crown" is an awesome volume. If you're not familiar with any of America's three great Wilderness trails, this is a head-first dive into refreshing waters.
Even those who consider themselves pseudo-expert hikers, well-read on these thru-hikes (like myself), will find delightful insights when seeing them presented back-to-back-to-back like this. For example, many PCT- and CDT-hikers tend to refer to the Appalachian Trail as "that wussy trail back East" because of its shorter mileage, lower elevation, and the fact that you really don't need a map because of crowds and blazed markings. However, she explains that the AT is actually the most difficult of the three when it comes to frequent steep climbs and rocky footpaths. Having only hiked sections of the PCT and CDT myself, I never knew that. Ground-leveling comparisons like that (no pun intended) abound through the text.
Being one of the few people ever to have finished the whole Triple Crown, Karen brings great perspective to the nature of America's greatest trails that few can claim to have. A fantastic book for anyone interested in ANY of these trails.
I checked this book out from my library. The book is dated (2001) but provides good advice for the PCT, the CDT, and the AT. The book is good on generalized approaches for sections of the trails (dry on southern CDT and PCT, don't worry about a rain suit) and describes the overall effort required for sections (easy, moderate, challenging). Overall, the book is a good read for a high level view of the trails, but for specific information on a hike, the newer trail-specific books are better.