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Seabiscuit: The True Story of Three Men and a Racehorse epub

by Campbell Scott,Laura Hillenbrand


Seabiscuit: The True Story of Three Men and a Racehorse epub

ISBN: 0007181183

ISBN13: 978-0007181186

Author: Campbell Scott,Laura Hillenbrand

Category: Sport

Subcategory: Individual Sports

Language: English

Publisher: HarperCollins Audio; Abridged edition (October 20, 2003)

ePUB book: 1227 kb

FB2 book: 1266 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 783

Other Formats: docx doc mbr lrf





Laura Hillenbrand tells the story of the horse who became a cultural icon in Seabiscuit: An American Legend.

Laura Hillenbrand tells the story of the horse who became a cultural icon in Seabiscuit: An American Legend. Hillenbrand details the ups and downs of "team Seabiscuit," from early training sessions to record-breaking victories, and from serious injury to "Horse of the Year"-as well as the Biscuit's fabled rivalry with War Admiral. She also describes the world of horseracing in the 1930s, from the snobbery of Eastern journalists regarding Western horses and public fascination with the great thoroughbreds to the jockeys' torturous weight-loss regimens, including saunas in rubber suits, strong purgatives, even tapeworms.

Laura Hillenbrand tells the story of the horse who became a cultural icon in Seabiscuit: the Making of a Legend. He didn't look like much. With his smallish stature, knobbly knees, and slightly crooked forelegs, he looked more like a cow pony than a thoroughbred. But looks aren't everything; his quality, an admirer once wrote, "was mostly in his heart". Seabiscuit rose to. Laura Hillenbrand tells the story of the horse who became a cultural icon in Seabiscuit: the Making of a Legend.

Nothing more than the story of Seabiscuit, a stunted colt with asymmetrical knees that had for two years been . Laura Hillenbrand is the author of the number-one bestseller Seabiscuit, which won the William Hill Sports Book of the Year award.

Nothing more than the story of Seabiscuit, a stunted colt with asymmetrical knees that had for two years been hacked around no-good race tracks which led to permanent leg damage. Yet by 1937 Seabiscuit could draw crowds of 60,000 and had more newspaper column inches devoted to him than Mussolini, Hitler or Roosevelt, his popularity peaking during his appearances at the Santa Anita Handicap. It was made into a major international film, which was nominated for seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture.

Seabiscuit had been a very late foal, born at the end of May 1933, but in January 1935, half a year short of his actual birthday, he was deemed a. .Led out of his stall with the two men standing by, Seabiscuit head-butted Howard.

Seabiscuit had been a very late foal, born at the end of May 1933, but in January 1935, half a year short of his actual birthday, he was deemed a two-year-old, officially eligible to race. On January 19, he began his career at Floridaâ?™s Hialeah Race Track. It wasnâ?™t good enough for the Wheatley Stable, which was overflowing with top prospects. Smith made his case with four sentences: â?œGet me that horse. He has real stuff in him.

Seabiscuit: An American Legend is a non-fiction book written by Laura Hillenbrand, published on June 30, 1999. The book is a biography of the Thoroughbred racehorse Seabiscuit. It won the William Hill Sports Book of the Year and was adapted as a feature film in 2003. It has also been published under the title: Seabiscuit: The True Story of Three Men and a Racehorse. The author has been praised for her ability to convey a sense of historical times. The 2003 film Seabiscuit was adapted from the book.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. From the author of Unbroken – a major motion picture releasing in 2015 – this is the bestselling true story of three men and their dreams for a racehorse, Seabiscuit. In 1938 one figure received more press coverage than Mussolini, Hitler or Roosevelt. Misunderstood and mishandled, Seabiscuit had spent seasons floundering in the lowest ranks of racing until a chance meeting of three men. Together, they created a champion.

Sunday Times & tells the story of the triumphs and tribulations of her cast of misfits with flair and skill .

Sunday Times & tells the story of the triumphs and tribulations of her cast of misfits with flair and skill, relishing the larger than life characters who inhabited this forgotten demimonde. Sunday Times & readable. Daily Mail & season's literary sensation.

Books related to Seabiscuit: The True Story of Three . Very interesting tracing the relationships between humans and animals, horses in particular. Rate it . You Rated it .

Books related to Seabiscuit: The True Story of Three Men and a Racehorse (Text Only). Not being a follower of racing, I found some of the race descriptions a little too dramatic and drawn out. Having said that, however, I was always keen to get to the end of the race to learn the outcome. Would be a great story for a horse racing enthusiast. by Lyn on October 22, 2015.

The spellbinding true story of how three men and a great racehorse captivated a nation, Laura Hillenbrand?s Seabiscuit: An American Legend became an immediate number one bestseller and cultural phenomenon upon its publication in 2001

The spellbinding true story of how three men and a great racehorse captivated a nation, Laura Hillenbrand?s Seabiscuit: An American Legend became an immediate number one bestseller and cultural phenomenon upon its publication in 2001. Named one of the best books of the year by more than twenty publications?including The New York Times, The Washington Post, Time, People, USA Today, and The Economist?Seabiscuit was also honored as the BookSense Nonfiction Book of the Year and the William Hill Sports Book of the Year, and was a finalist for several other major prizes, including the National Book.

Misunderstood and mishandled, Seabiscuit had spent seasons floundering in the lowest ranks of racing until a chance meeting of three men. This is a story which topped the bestseller charts for over two years; a riveting tale of grit, grace, luck and an underdog’s stubborn determination to win against all odds.

The true story of three men and their dreams for a racehorse -- Seabiscuit -- that symbolised a pivotal moment in American history, as the twentieth century's greatest nation found the courage to bet on itself to win against the odds. Now a major motion picture directed by Gary Ross and starring Toby Maguire and Jeff Daniels. In 1936 the habits of 19th-century America were finally consigned to history just as Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind was published. In their place, modern America was born. But what defined this new era? Nothing more than the story of Seabiscuit, a stunted colt with asymmetrical knees that had for two years been hacked around no-good race tracks which led to permanent leg damage. Yet by 1937 Seabiscuit could draw crowds of 60,000 and had more newspaper column inches devoted to him than Mussolini, Hitler or Roosevelt, his popularity peaking during his appearances at the Santa Anita Handicap. America had gone to the races for the first time since the Depression and fallen in love with a misshapen colt of great character. Now it wanted a winner. Seabiscuit is aslo the story of three men: Tom Smith, a former Wild West Showman was the trainer; Red Pollard, abandoned by his poverty stricken family at a race track became the rider; and Charles Howard, a pioneer car manufacturer in San Francisco in the 1920s was the owner and financier. These three combined to create the legend of Seabiscuit and epitomise a dream for the emerging new America.
Great book about about a fairytale horse who stole the hearts of America. I'm 70 and can remember Seabiscuit appearing in cartoons we'd watch on Saturday mornings in the 50's. I'd always wonder about those cameos and why they were there. This book explains why: Seabiscuit was a national phenomenon.
The book tells the story of the horse and the exceptional team of owner, trainer and jockeys that combined to create that phenomenon. At the same time the details behind and within the 2 minutes of a horse race. The book is totally fascinating and I read it once every few years for both the content and excellent story telling of Hillenbrand. Another favorite by her is "Unbroken" about an exceptional track star in the 1940's.
I reread this book after my initial read several years ago, and it was just as enjoyable as my first. Ms. Hillenbrand's extremely well-researched story puts you right in the saddle alongside Seabiscuit jockeys Red Pollard and George Woolf. My Uncle Nori owned several thoroughbred race horses - most of them Claimers - and told me something that I had always taken as a trainer's unfounded superstition when he said, "...you can tell if a horse is ready to run by feeling his ankles." We were in a stable at Caliente Race Track at the time, and I was just 10 years old. Uncle Nori knelt beside his horse, Toro Tuck, and wrapped his hands around the horses lower leg. "Cold as ice," he smiled back at me. "He's ready to go today." I recall being up in the grandstands watching the finish of the race - and hearing my uncle yell his lungs out, "Look at him go! Look at him go!" When the results were posted, and Toro Tuck was declared the winner, I turned to my uncle and asked him if he had put any money on his horse. He smiled down at me and fanned about a half-dozen $100 Win tickets at me. Hillenbrand's book brought all these vivid memories rushing back to me, and verified the truth behind my uncle's insight into a thoroughbred's race readiness.
I have read and reread Seabiscuit at least 3 or 4 times. To me, it's a classic! The author develops the characters thoroughly, including Seabiscuit. The owner, trainer, and jockey were incredible people. They were all very sensitive to each other's knowledge and expertise when it came to Seabiscuit. There were numerous times throughout the book when the author was describing a race...I found may heart pounding as if I was actually watching a real horse race. Seabiscuit was an amazing animal. He was intelligent, sensitive, and cunning. Even though he was not the most beautiful horse, he loved competition. He truly is "an American legend." Please read this book...it's a feel good story, and will bring a tear to your eye.
A wonderful piece of writing. Laura Hillenbrand has a talent for gathering material from diverse sources and weaving it into a story that's readable, believable, and lovable. It's good literature and at the same time, good history. I just wish she would take on the story of Goldsmith Maid, a racemare who was literally hell on wheels, conquering both stud horses and other mares on her way to new world records. Compared to Seabisquit, there's a paucity of first hand resources here cause the mare is all but forgotten, but Laura might appreciate the challenge.

Oh well. Anyone interested in depression era horse racing or simply interested in a good story won't be disappointed in "Seabisquit". This lady can write. Both the book and the movie are worth the hype.
Incredible book. Laura Hillenbrand did the deep research not only on Seabiscuit, but the evolution of hors racing in the U.S. Then she wrote a compelling narrative about Seabiscuit and the people who owned, trained and rode him. Jockey Johnny "Red" Pollard, trainer Tom Smith and owner Charles Howard come to life in the book. Hillenbrand is a master of conveying their personal successes and failures with understanding and sensitivity. And the insights into professional horse racing were spellbinding. Great read. Can't wait for Hillenbrand's next work.
First, I am grateful for Ms Hillenbrand's second book, Unbroken (an excellent book by itself). Otherwise I would not have discovered Seabiscuit. I read the book, Secretariat, by William Nack, but did not give much thought to reading Seabiscuit. I was so impressed with Laura Hillenbrand's story-telling ability, however, that I knew I had to read it. Second, the story's underlying theme is as relevant today as it was in the 1930s and 1940s: then, as now, our country needed something or someone to cheer for; a positive story, or a role model, to unify and uplift its people. And the human and equine qualities that defined the story's characters, such as the will to persevere against all odds, are timeless and are meticulously presented. And what more can I possibly say about Seabiscuit? Unlike Secretariat, a thoroughbred in every official sense, Seabiscuit lacked the conformation that thoroughbred horses usually possess. But what he lacked in structure, he possessed in spirit, courage and the unbounded ability to run. So, we can learn a lot from this horse, and this beautifully written story, if we pay attention. I highly recommend this book; you will marvel, shake your head in disbelief and you will cry, if you're inclined to do so.
This was absolutely fantastic!

While written in the same manner as Unbroken....this book just drew me in!

I absolutely loved learning about the ins and outs of horse racing

The story of Seabiscuit and Red Pollard is nothing short of awe inspiring.

It's a fabulous read.....don't let the historical aspect turn you off from it.

Loved it. A book to read again
This is am amazing book about an amazing horse and the humans who had faith in his greatness. The mater-of-fact description of the lengths to which jockeys went to make weight, the mortal danger they faced each time they rode and the abuse heaped upon them by owners and tracks was chilling. The descriptions of the races were thrilling and made me feel like I was there on the rail myself. This is a page turner with a heart as bid as its subject.