» » Jews and Blacks: A Dialogue on Race, Religion, and Culture in America

Jews and Blacks: A Dialogue on Race, Religion, and Culture in America epub

by Cornel West,Michael Lerner


Jews and Blacks: A Dialogue on Race, Religion, and Culture in America epub

ISBN: 0452275911

ISBN13: 978-0452275911

Author: Cornel West,Michael Lerner

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Social Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: Plume (February 1, 1996)

Pages: 304 pages

ePUB book: 1538 kb

FB2 book: 1765 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 645

Other Formats: lrf docx txt mobi





Jews and Blacks: A Dialog. has been added to your Cart. Lerner writes in his Introduction to this 1995 book, "Cornel West and I have holed ourselves away from our respective worlds and spent full days, and on one occasion a full week, talking and recording our conversations.

Jews and Blacks: A Dialog. The dialogue contained in this book represents only a fraction of the wide range of philosophical, political, religious, and personal issues that we touched on. We got to know each other's lives, sources of joy and fear, emotional realities, and range of intellectual interests.

Jews and Blacks book. Lerner and West's conversation is as moving in text as it must have been in person. The conversation is frank and without reservation and worth any reader's time. Credible and important. Mar 01, 2018 Jay rated it really liked it. Shelves: non-fiction, social-cultural, religion. A pretty good read - I enjoyed the format and seeing a good faith discussion of some tricky topics. I didn't necessary agree on all points, but the idea of an ongoing dialogue like this is one that I think a lot of people can benefit from.

Can Jews and Blacks be friends and allies once again? It's neither easy nor impossible, say Michael Lerner and Cornel West, in a dialogue that looks at the most pressing problems of contemporary America through the prism o. .

Can Jews and Blacks be friends and allies once again? It's neither easy nor impossible, say Michael Lerner and Cornel West, in a dialogue that looks at the most pressing problems of contemporary America through the prism of the relationship between their two communities. The alliance between Blacks and Jews was the cornerstone of liberal politics for much of the twentieth century. Examining the issues that have united Blacks and Jews in the past and now separate them, two long-time friends and leading intellectuals try to restore the special relationship between the two groups in a hard-hitting and worthwhile exchange.

Cornel Ronald West (born June 2, 1953) is an American philosopher . Jews and Blacks: A Dialogue on Race, Religion, and Culture in America (with rabbi Michael Lerner, 1995).

Cornel Ronald West (born June 2, 1953) is an American philosopher, political activist, social critic, author, and public intellectual. The son of a Baptist minister, West focuses on the role of race, gender, and class in American society and the means by which people act and react to their "radical conditionedness". The recipient of more than 20 honorary degrees and an American Book Award, he has written or contributed to over twenty published books. The Future of the Race (with Henry Louis Gates, J. 1996).

A Dialogue on Race, Religion, and Culture in America. By Michael Lerner and Cornel West. Can Jews and Blacks be friends and allies once again? It’s neither easy nor impossible, say Michael Lerner and Cornel West, in a dialogue that looks at the most pressing problems of contemporary America through the prism of the relationship between their two communities. Yet today there are people in each community who see their former ally as their most dangerous foe.

Credible and important. With a new epilogue on the simpson verdict and the Million Man March. Jews and Blacks : A Dialogue on Race, Religion, and Culture in America.

In April 2002 West and Rabbi Michael Lerner performed civil disobedience by sitting in the street in front of the . State Department "in solidarity with suffering Palestinian and Israeli brothers and sisters. West said, "We must keep in touch with the humanity of both sides. In May 2007 West joined a demonstration against "injustices faced by the Palestinian people resulting from the Israeli occupation" and "to bring attention to this 40-year travesty of justice".

My mind is drawn back to the 1995 book by Michael Lerner and Cornel West, Jews and Blacks: A Dialogue on Race, Religion and Culture in America. Lerner and West ask each other difficult questions. Lerner and West ask each other difficult questions

In April 2002 West and Rabbi Michael Lerner performed civil disobedience by sitting in the street in front of the . In May 2007 West joined a demonstration against "injustices faced by the Palestinian people resulting from the Israeli occupation" and "to bring attention to this 40 year travesty of justice".

"Credible and important."—Kirkus ReviewsExamining the issues that have united Blacks and Jews in the past and now separate them, two long-time friends and leading intellectuals try to restore the special relationship between the two groups in a hard-hitting and worthwhile exchange.Can Jews and Blacks be friends and allies once again? It's neither easy nor impossible, say Michael Lerner and Cornel West, in a dialogue that looks at the most pressing problems of contemporary America through the prism of the relationship between their two communities. The alliance between Blacks and Jews was the cornerstone of liberal politics for much of the twentieth century. Yet today there are people in each community who see their former ally as their most dangerous foe. In the current political climate, it would be easy to suggest we gloss over the differences and unite in the face of a common enemy: the reactionary right. But calls for unity are not likely to succeed unless they are based on working through the explosive issues that separate communities. West and Lerner refuse to compromise their deeply held views for the sake of unity. In a dialogue that is always respectful, though sometimes marked by tension, they help each other understand their different ways of looking at the world. Avoiding easy outs and quick fixes, they explore such subjects as Louis Farrakhan, Zionism, the economic inequalities between Jewish and Black communities, crime, and affirmative action. Both powerful public intellectuals, Lerner and West take on some of the most demanding problems of our time, in a sophisticated but extremely accessible way. They conclude with a plan for healing the rifts that have developed. But in a deeper sense, it is their dialogue itself that is healing. Lerner and West's relationship is a model rarely seen in American politics: two powerful men ready to explore differences, not afraid to disagree, and drawn through the course of the dialogue to grow closer and morecaring for each other. The dialogue of this book is a model for both the Black and the Jewish communities, and it suggests that healing and transformation are possible, and that hope can triumph over cynicism and despair.With a new epilogue on the O.J. Simpson verdict and the Million Man March.
This is a rear development unless one is real and transparent and progressive in thinking. I highly recommend the book for those that needs opinion of others as blessings. Good condition and timely delivered.
great book
Cornel West is a Princeton professor, magnificent public speaker, activist, author (e.g., Race Matters,Democracy Matters: Winning the Fight Against Imperialism,The American Evasion of Philosophy: A Genealogy of Pragmatism (Wisconsin Project on American Writers), etc.), and preeminent "public intellectual." Michael Lerner is the editor of Tikkun magazine, a political activist, and author (e.g., The Politics Of Meaning: Restoring Hope And Possibility In An Age Of Cynicism,Left Hand of God, The: Healing America's Political and Spiritual Crisis,Jewish Renewal: Path to Healing and Transformation, A, etc.).

Lerner writes in his Introduction to this 1995 book, "Cornel West and I have holed ourselves away from our respective worlds and spent full days, and on one occasion a full week, talking and recording our conversations. The dialogue contained in this book represents only a fraction of the wide range of philosophical, political, religious, and personal issues that we touched on. We got to know each other's lives, sources of joy and fear, emotional realities, and range of intellectual interests. We read each other's books and articles, we hung out with each other's families, and we grew increasingly excited about the other. In the process, I not only came to deeply respect Cornel's incredible intellect but to love him."

West writes in his Introduction, "We had to cast our exchange in such a way that we highlighted moral ideals and existential realities bigger and better than both Black and Jewish interests. We had to examine what it means to be human as Jews and Blacks and how this relates to keeping alive the best of a precious yet precarious experiment in democracy. We also had to examine the ways in which we could revitalize progressive politics in the light of prophetic traditions in the Black and Jewish heritages."

Here are some quotations from the book:

ML: "To Jews it appears as if Blacks are lumping us together with all whites---and not just any whites but the worst ones on the block." (Pg. 45-46)
CW: "The relationship between America and Israel is much more intimate than between America and any African nation... You can't expect Black folk not to focus on Israel when that's what the papers cover. The major issue Black people fear is white supremacy; and what scenario do you find? White Jewish Israeli society---we see very little Jews of color and Sephardic Jews..." (Pg. 59)
ML: "Black-American ignorance about Israel and about African nation states is not just a fact of nature: it reflects the failure of the Black leadership and of Black liberation struggles. Black progressives spend more time educating American Blacks about what's wrong with Israel than about what's wrong with African states." (Pg. 60)
ML: So the category is about something else besides skin color---it's about one's relationship to oppression. And by calling Jews 'whites,' Blacks are in effect denying our history of oppression." (Pg. 67)
CW: "There is a struggle going on over the minds, bodies, and souls of young Black Americans, some of whom will go through Minister Farrakhan's organization and end up as progressives. How soon? It's hard to say. The progressive Black nationalist position is the closest I come to, although I personally don't consider myself a nationalist of any sort." (Pg. 95)
CW: "Marcus Garvey was a Zionist. Du Bois was a Zionist. King was a Zionist. In their own words they expressed support for the Zionist movement. By the mid-sixties, especially 1967 and the beginning of the Occupation, the mood in the Black community slowly, but significantly, begins to be critical of Zionism." (Pg. 109)
ML: "I'm a religious Zionist. Religious Zionist means that I have the view that the world is governed and ought to be governed by God and that the nation has a relationship and a claim to the extent that it lives according to God's will." (Pg. 128)
CW: "First, I don't think Black churches have adequately reflected on the potentially anti-Semitic element in the Christian narrative. Second, I don't believe progressive Black nationalists have acknowledged the degree to which anti-Semitic elements have been built into the Black nationalist tradition. Not every Black nationalist is an anti-Semite, just as not every Zionist hates Palestinians." (Pg. 137)
CW: "A small percentage of Black people are committing a disporportionate amount of crime. There's nothing racist about pointing that out." (Pg. 140)
ML: "I am not saying, 'You are wrong to have a public debate with Farrakhan.' I'm not against that, although I should say that in my own community I refused to debate Kahane, on the grounds that there were certain kinds of hatred that were so far out of the tradition that they no longer deserve to be considered part of the community's legitimate dialogue. Giving him that debate was in effect legitimating his voice within the community." (Pg. 200)
CW: "There are many King-like figures on the grassroots level in the Black community, but with the chasm in place we hardly ever hear about them. And so one has to go out to do the kind of thing I was talking about before to bring these folk together." (Pg. 268)
How are two of America's minorities, Blacks and Jews, getting along? Are they fighting for human rights together? Or are some of them bailing out on support for human rights, at least on some issues, as if they have forgotten that oppression is bad? Michael Lerner and Cornel West explore some of these issues.

One question is, of course, justice, and that includes high-publicity trials for violent crimes. I have noticed that many Whites are willing to strongly denounce the outcomes of the Rodney King and Latasha Harlins cases. It seems to me that fewer Blacks are as willing to denounce the outcomes of the Nicole Simpson/Ron Goldman and Yankel Rosenbaum trials. I was hoping this book would have, as a minimum, both authors advocate that both sides do better here. There will occasionally be some outrageous outcomes of court cases. We have to accept that. But I think we have to speak out in favor of truth and justice and do it loudly. And I think this book is far from satisfactory in that regard.

On another topic, here is an amazing quote from Lerner:

"I don't underestimate the pernicious effect on Jewish consciousness of Commentary Magazine and The New Republic, each of which has given a certain intellectual legitimacy to racist tendencies in the Jewish world, most importantly the deep desire to imagine that Jews have no serious moral or political stake in ending the economic oppression of Blacks. But these are nevertheless not people who in any overt and conscious way say that Blacks are an evil force in the world."

Wow. It is true that there are a few Blacks who do insist that Jews are an evil force in the world. But why contrast them with Commentary, which is a conservative but non-racist magazine, let alone with The New Republic, which is a liberal magazine that does claim that we all have a serious moral and political stake in ending discrimination against Blacks?

There is an interesting discussion of Black nationalism. And I certainly agree that it is wrong to oppose nationalism simply on the grounds that some nationalists can be racists or bigots. When people have common interests or problems, it often makes sense for them to form a national group. There's also a discussion of Jewish nationalism. Lerner makes the point that the Dreyfus case in France was a key element in showing the need for Jewish nationalism.

Now, what ought one hope for in a book of this sort? One hope might be that right or wrong, the two authors would agree on how to cooperate. They would come up with some bad ideas, but the good part would be that they agreed! Another hope could be that they would come up with good ideas. I think they came closer to the former than the latter.