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A Queer Geography: Journeys Toward a Sexual Self epub

by Frank Browning


A Queer Geography: Journeys Toward a Sexual Self epub

ISBN: 0517598574

ISBN13: 978-0517598573

Author: Frank Browning

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Social Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: Crown; 1 edition (April 2, 1996)

Pages: 240 pages

ePUB book: 1961 kb

FB2 book: 1484 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 320

Other Formats: mbr lrf lrf azw





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A Queer Geography book.

Browning's Culture of Desire (1993) regarded modern gay American culture as having evolved out of sexual desire. I read both Michaelangelo Signorielli's book Life Outside and Gabriel Rotello's book Sexual Ecology

Browning's Culture of Desire (1993) regarded modern gay American culture as having evolved out of sexual desire. I read both Michaelangelo Signorielli's book Life Outside and Gabriel Rotello's book Sexual Ecology. Rotello I found to be a bit dull and unwilling to entertain the thoughts of those who might disagree, though I still found him enlightening and interesting, and I thought the book was major piece of scientific work. Signorile I found to be thoughtful overall, far from dull, and quite perceptive. The book was also well-written.

In A Queer Geography, Frank Browning looks at the effect that geography - literally being in different places in the world - has on the definition of sexuality and sexual roles. What makes up the gay identity? What part do upbringing, family tradition, and cultural "norms" play on the development of one's sense of self? In A Queer Geography, Frank Browning looks at the effect that geography - literally being in different places in the world - has on the definition of sexuality and sexual roles.

A Queer Geography: Journeys Toward a Sexual Self. In a brilliant argument, Browning shows how and why the gay movement could have only arisen in America. What is the gay identity? Do gay people even exist? The bestselling author of The Culture of Desire journeys into the minds of gay men in America and elsewhere to discover how their lives are shaped by time, nation, and desire. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Frank Browning is an American author and former correspondent forĀ .

Frank Browning is an American author and former correspondent for National Public Radio. The author of seven books, his work has appeared in the Washington Post Magazine, the LA Times, Mother Jones, Playboy, Penthouse, Salon and numerous other publications. He has also reported for Marketplace and This American Life. Browning, Frank (1996), A Queer Geography: Journeys Toward a Sexual Self, ISBN 978-0-517-59857-3. Browning, Frank (1998), Apples: Story of the Fruit of Temptation, North Point Press, ISBN 978-0-86547-537-3.

Journeys Toward a Sexual Self. FRANK BROWNING is a writer and contributor to National Public Radio. He is the author of five books, including Apples: The Story of the Fruit of Temptation, recipient of a 1999 IACP Julia Child Award. Category: Psychology History.

A Queer Geography : Journeys toward a Sexual Self. Browning's greatest skill is as a storyteller in classic American Style

A Queer Geography : Journeys toward a Sexual Self. By (author) Frank Browning. Browning's greatest skill is as a storyteller in classic American Style. -Wayne Hoffman, "Windy City Times " show more.

Read "A Queer Geography Journeys Toward a Sexual Self" by FrankĀ . Journeys Toward a Sexual Self.

Coauthors & Alternates.

The vanishing land: The corporate theft of America (Harper colophon books). ISBN 9780060903619 (978-0-06-090361-9) Harper & Row, 1975. Coauthors & Alternates.

What is the gay identity? Do gay people even exist? The bestselling author of The Culture of Desire journeys into the minds of gay men in America and elsewhere to discover how their lives are shaped by time, nation, and desire. In a brilliant argument, Browning shows how and why the gay movement could have only arisen in America.
I'm not sure what happened to Frank Browning. His first book, The Culture of Desire, was interesting and provocative. It got me thinking and it was, above all, generous. It was inclusive and it was respectful of so many kinds of gay people. This book is the complete opposite. Browning comes off like a closed-minded old man--and I don't mean that in an ageist way. A young person could sound like an old fool, so it's not about age. It's about style and openess and thinking. It's about personal attacks and ugliness. And it's about sticking to a post-structuralist, Foucauldian agenda, even when it doesn't intrique or make sense. I read both Michaelangelo Signorielli's book Life Outside and Gabriel Rotello's book Sexual Ecology. Rotello I found to be a bit dull and unwilling to entertain the thoughts of those who might disagree, though I still found him enlightening and interesting, and I thought the book was major piece of scientific work. Signorile I found to be thoughtful overall, far from dull, and quite perceptive. The book was also well-written. But all that Browning has to say about these two is that they're "policing" desire. He has nothing good to say about them and their work, and seems instead to be hellbent on attacking them. It so much deviates from his usual thoughtful style, and it's a real embarrassment. I can only imagine that he's jealous of them for taking the spotlight while he's been nowhere to be found. He reduces and simplifies their work in ways that I think is dishonest, as I cannot believe he actually thinks these things to be true. Furthermore, his use of postmodern theory is just hackneyed and pitiful. In his first book it was an interesting aside, something we should consider. In this book, it has become the religion by which he judges everything. He's turned me off. I think this book is a total mess--and boring.
Broad view of cultural, ethnic and class acceptance and practices of homosexuality ... very enlightening because the comparisons are well thought out and challenge common stereotypes.
This book should insult any gay man who considers himself to be an intellectual. Full of faulty logic, purple prose, gross generalizations, and accounts of Browning's crusing experiences, the textoffers a disturbing, degrading picture of homosexuality. Despite a section on the works of Michel Foucault, the text demonstrates no knowledge of political ontology; also, the text avoids mentioning the works of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick and David Halperin, but it posits Camille Paglia as an intellectual diety--look out! The correlation between coming out and becoming "born again" just doesn't work: the former is an outward, social/public event, and the latter is an inward, spiritual one. Nonetheless, the cover of the book reproduces a beautifu, homoeroticl print by Paul Cadmus.
Best thing I've yet read on why so many of us younger, er, gays, are feeling increasingly "post-gay."
Same-sex desire can cohere into many different identities -- we've known that since Foucault. Same-sex behavior often does not cohere into an identity at all -- we've known that at least since "Tea Room Trade." So why does Browning present it as a remarkable revelation that he has just now thought of, and that will come to the reader as a shocking revelation? This is a well written book, but interesting accounts of pansexual Arcadias are unfortunately interspliced with annoyingly self-absorbed tales of his tricks -- Browning believes that he is hot enough to attract every guy in the world, straight, gay, or whatever, and that the reader is desperately interested in hearing the details. I can buy better porn elsewhere -- but my problem with this book is not that there are many ways to express same-sex desire, not that there is gay life beyond the Castro Street clones with gym memberships and charge accounts at Ikea -- who'd want a world where everybody is the same? But Browning continuously states that those clones have no right to exist, that they are inauthentic, self-absorbed, sex-obsessed closet bisexuals. Gay life should should not ever include muscles, circuit parties, and political activism. In fact, there should be no gay people, anywhere, ever, just promiscuous pansexuals going with the flow. In a less enlightened age, we would call such rantings homophobic.