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Eugene Kinckle Jones: The National Urban League and Black Social Work, 1910-1940 epub

by Felix L. Armfield


Eugene Kinckle Jones: The National Urban League and Black Social Work, 1910-1940 epub

ISBN: 0252036581

ISBN13: 978-0252036583

Author: Felix L. Armfield

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Social Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: University of Illinois Press; 1st edition (December 14, 2011)

Pages: 136 pages

ePUB book: 1371 kb

FB2 book: 1655 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 778

Other Formats: mbr doc txt lrf





This important book rescues Eugene Kinckle Jones from relative historical obscurity and anchors his rightful place .

This important book rescues Eugene Kinckle Jones from relative historical obscurity and anchors his rightful place as a major black leader during the first half of the twentieth century. Effectively captured E. Kinckle Jones’s impact on the practice of professional social work. Jones and the work of the National Urban League helped to place African American social work squarely within the parameters of the emerging profession.

Eugene Kinckle Jones book. In his role as executive secretary of the National Urban League, Jones worked closely with social reformers who advocated on behalf of African Americans and against racial discrimination in the United S A leading African American intellectual of the early twentieth century, Eugene Kinckle Jones (1885-1954) was instrumental in professionalizing black social work in America.

Eugene Kinckle Jones (July 30, 1885 – January 11, 1954) was a leader of the National Urban League and one the seven founders (commonly referred to as Seven Jewels) of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity at Cornell University in 1906. Jones became Alpha chapter's second President. Jones was born in Richmond, Virginia to Joseph Endom Jones and Rosa Daniel Kinckle. He graduated from Richmond's Virginia Union University in 1905 and Cornell University with a master's degree in 1908.

In his role as executive secretary of the National Urban League, Jones worked cl. A leading African American intellectual of the early twentieth century, Eugene Kinckle Jones (1885-1954) was instrumental in professionalizing black social work in America. In his role as executive secretary of the National Urban League, Jones worked closely with social reformers who advocated on behalf of African Americans and against racial discrimination in the United States.

Eugene kinckle jones. Authors: Armfield, Felix L. About Speedyhen. A leading African American intellectual, Eugene Kinckle Jones (1885-1954) was instrumental in professionalizing black social work in America. Number Of Pages: 136. Length: 231mm. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 8 brand new listings. This title tells his story.

This book examines the life and work of Eugene Kinckle Jones (1885–1954), along with the rise of professional black social workers within the larger context of social work and its professionalization.

Published by: University of Illinois Press. This book examines the life and work of Eugene Kinckle Jones (1885–1954), along with the rise of professional black social workers within the larger context of social work and its professionalization. In 1971, Guichard Parris and Lester Brooks published the first major history of the National Urban League (NUL), Blacks in the City: A History of the National Urban League. Parris and Brooks put forth this much-needed history during the black-power movement in America. Several factors prompted a need for this history.

A leading African American intellectual, Eugene Kinckle Jones (1885–1954) was instrumental in professionalizing .

A leading African American intellectual, Eugene Kinckle Jones (1885–1954) was instrumental in professionalizing black social work in America. Jones used his position was executive secretary of the National Urban League to work with social reformers advocating on behalf of African Americans and against racial discrimination. He also led the Urban League's efforts at campaigning for equal hiring practices and the inclusion of black workers in labor unions, and promoted the importance of vocational training and social work.

By Felix L. Armfield. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2012

By Felix L. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2012. The special strength of this biography of Eugene Kinckle Jones, who led the National Urban League through the years surrounding the two world wars, is Armfield's decision to frame his study around the strong effort of social workers to become recognized as skilled, highly trained professionals on par with lawyers and physicians.

In his role as executive secretary of the National Urban League, Jones worked closely with social reformers who advocated on behalf of African Americans and against racial discrimination in the United States. x000B ­Drawing on rich interviews with Jones's colleagues and associates, as well as recently opened family and Urban League papers, Felix L. Armfield freshly examines the growth of. African American communities and the new roles played by social workers. This book blends the biography of a significant black leader with an in-­depth discussion of the roles of black institutions and.

A leading African American intellectual, Eugene Kinckle Jones (1885–1954) was instrumental in professionalizing black social work in America. Jones used his position was executive secretary of the National Urban League to work with social reformers advocating on behalf of African Americans and against racial discrimination. He also led the Urban League's efforts at campaigning for equal hiring practices and the inclusion of black workers in labor unions, and promoted the importance of vocational training and social work.   Drawing on interviews with Jones's colleagues and associates, as well as recently opened family and Urban League archives, Felix L. Armfield blends biography with an in-depth discussion of the roles of black institutions and organizations. The result is a work that offers new details on the growth of African American communities, the evolution of African American life, and the role of black social workers in the years before the civil rights era.