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Postnationalism Prefigured: Caribbean Borderlands epub

by Charles V. Carnegie


Postnationalism Prefigured: Caribbean Borderlands epub

ISBN: 0813530547

ISBN13: 978-0813530543

Author: Charles V. Carnegie

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Social Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: Rutgers University Press (September 30, 2002)

Pages: 288 pages

ePUB book: 1412 kb

FB2 book: 1930 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 217

Other Formats: doc lrf mobi docx





Charles V. Carnegie teaches anthropology and is the chair of the African American studies program at Bates College, Maine.

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Carnegie shows not only that the nation-state is an exhausted form of political organization, but that in the Caribbean the ideological and political reach of the nation-state has always been tenuous at best.

Charles V. Carnegie "recent work focuses on identity categories and on issues of nationalism and transnationalism.

Estudio etnográfico cuyo autor reúne e interpreta la experiencia de diversos grupos étnicos del Caribe y trata de demostrar que raza y nación son formas conceptuales y organizacionales construidas y utilizadas por los grupos sociales para su convivencia

Cooper Coole; Ruth Landes: A Life in Anthropology (Olivia Maria Gomes Da Cunha) Maureen Warner Lewis; Central Africa in the Caribbean: Transcending Time, Transforming Cultures (Robert W. Slenes) Gert Oostindie (e.

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has always been tenuous at best.

We do not consider it noteworthy when somebody moves three thousand miles from New York to Los Angeles. Yet we think that movement across borders requires a major degree of adjustment, and that an individual who migrates 750 miles from Haiti to Miami has done something extraordinary. Charles V. Carnegie suggests that to people from the Caribbean, migration is simply one of many ways to pursue a better future and to survive in a world over which they have little control

Carnegie shows not only that the nation-state is an exhausted form of political organization, but that in the Caribbean the ideological and political reach of the nation-state has always been tenuous at best. Caribbean peoples, he suggests, live continually in breach of the nation-state configuration. Drawing both on his own experiences as a Jamaican-born anthropologist and on the examples provided by those who have always considered national borders as little more than artificial administrative nuisances, Carnegie investigates a fascinating spectrum of individuals, including Marcus Garvey, traders, black albinos, and Caribbean Ba’hais. If these people have not themselves developed a scholarly doctrine of transnationalism, they have, nevertheless, effectively lived its demand and prefigured a postnational life.