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Three Famines: Starvation and Politics epub

by Thomas Keneally


Three Famines: Starvation and Politics epub

ISBN: 1610390652

ISBN13: 978-1610390651

Author: Thomas Keneally

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Politics & Government

Language: English

Publisher: PublicAffairs; First Edition edition (August 30, 2011)

Pages: 336 pages

ePUB book: 1519 kb

FB2 book: 1808 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 520

Other Formats: lit mobi azw mbr





Thomas Keneally, the Australian novelist, writes vividly about the depths to which human beings descend during famines. The book is both reportage of starvation and analysis of how famine is made.

Thomas Keneally, the Australian novelist, writes vividly about the depths to which human beings descend during famines. His examples are Ireland, Bengal and Ethiopia, and there are similarities among the three. The "politics" in his subtitle points to the fact that drought, blight and pestilence may be unavoidable but famine is a manmade phenomenon. This may be an elementary point, but it needs to be made time and again. One of Keneally's most intriguing passages is his description of Charles Trevelyan, assistant secretary to the treasury in Whitehall in the 1840s.

Financial Times "Thomas Keneally. The book is both reportage of starvation and analysis of how famine is made

Financial Times "Thomas Keneally. The 'politics' in his subtitle points to the fact that drought, blight and pestilence may be unavoidable but famine is a manmade phenomenon.

These three famines are stark examples of how throughout history, racial preconceptions, administrative neglect, and incompetence have been more lethal than the initiating blights or crop failures

These three famines are stark examples of how throughout history, racial preconceptions, administrative neglect, and incompetence have been more lethal than the initiating blights or crop failures. Keneally's startling narrative history is a sobering warning to the authorities in charge of mercy in our time to stop making choices that feed famine instead of the starving.

Start by marking Three Famines: Starvation and Politics as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Famine may be triggered by nature but its outcome arises from politics and ideology. In Three Famines, award-winning. Alex de Waal on the most avoidable of unnatural disasters. Three Famines: Starvation and Politics, by Thomas Keneally

Famine may be triggered by nature but its outcome arises from politics and ideology. Three Famines: Starvation and Politics, by Thomas Keneally.

Keneally, Thomas, 1935-. Three famines, Tom Keneally. Democracy and Starvation

Keneally, Thomas, 1935-. ISBN 978 1 74166 856 8(pb. Famines - History. Democracy and Starvation. IN HIS BOOK Development as Freedom, the winner of the 1998 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, Amartya Kumar Sen, wrote, ‘No famine has taken place in the history of the world in a functioning democracy. How does this dictum apply to the Irish famine? Though at the time of the famine the term ‘democrat’ stood in most British minds for something close to the sense ‘Communist’ attained in the West in the 1950s, Britain considered itself the home of liberal institutions.

a very engaging read. Three Famines: Starvation and Politics. FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Famine may be triggered by nature but its outcome arises from politics and ideology. Thomas Keneally Book Week.

Starvation and Politics. Keneally takes particular aim at Malthusian explanations that couple famine with overpopulation.

Not that Keneally hasn't written an excellent and well documented book

Not that Keneally hasn't written an excellent and well documented book. What's compelling here is Keneally's contention that it is not climatological but political problems that cause famines. A brief and sickening overview of three historical examples of famines - the Irish potato famine, the Bengalese famine during WWII, and the Ethiopian famines of the 1970s-80s. Compares and contrasts the three examples, with the physiological and psychological effects of famine, as well as the heroes and villains of each case - those who tried to get the word out, and.

As Thomas Keneally puts it in Three Famines : The victim becomes a new person. Starvation and Politics. 323 pp. PublicAffairs. The fastidious become slovenly; the kindly become aggressive; the moral are caught up in the great amorality of famine. Fraternity and love wither.

Famine may be triggered by nature but its outcome arises from politics and ideology. In Three Famines, award-winning author Thomas Keneally uncovers the troubling truth—that sustained widespread hunger is historically the outcome of government neglect and individual venality. Through the lens of three of the most disastrous famines in modern history—the potato famine in Ireland, the famine in Bengal in 1943, and the string of famines that plagued Ethiopia in the 1970s and 1980s— Keneally shows how ideology, mindsets of governments, racial preconceptions, and administrative incompetence were, ultimately, more lethal than the initiating blights or crop failures.

In this compelling narrative, Keneally recounts the histories of these events while vividly evoking the terrible cost of famine at the level of the individual who starves and the nation that withers.

Very interesting read about three famines. What really interested me was that all were preventable, especially the Irish famine which brought my ancestors to America. Had the British had more human compassion for Irish I'd be living in the UK.
I found this work to be both scholarly and readable. It lays blame for famines directly where it needs to be, centralized governments. It also shows the physical, cultural, and personal effects of starvation on different groups. Very informative and fascinating book.
I thought this book was a bit chaotic and tried to make analogies that were broad enough to be more than obvious. By using famine's that were all over the place historically it was hard to analyze what extraneous pressures came to bear on the institutions and people responsible for the catastrophes. The initial descriptions of the effects of hunger were extremely enlightening but the rest of the book was a jumble of ideas and histories and did not form any cohesive argument.
For those interested in the related issues of hunger, starvation, and the human consequences of venal politics, Three Famines is a book worth reading. Keneally discusses three Famines (the Irish potato blight, the Bengal famine of 1943-4 and the recurring Ethiopian famines) in the context of ideology, policy, and the amazing lack of empathy decision-makers have for the poor. He finds a common thread in these crises, including the physical and psychological effects on the people who suffer but also in the ways in which famine is responded to by governments and aid organizations.

While Keneally does not go as in depth on the Bengal famine as Madhusree Mukerjee (in her book Churchill's Secret War) or on the Irish famine as in many other works, his knowledge of and description of the Ethiopian famines is top-notch.

The book is a very easy read (though the content is hard to get through for the empathetic). I would have liked to divine more "outrage" but very likely Kenneally feels it but wants the reader to find it her/himself.

I recommend this book without hesitation.
Thomas Keneally, in his recent book Three Famines, takes a rather clinical approach to mass starvation. The reader expecting any sentimentality toward the victims of such eras will not find it here. Readers will, however, come away with a deeper understanding of the factors contributing to famines. Keneally makes his points through revisiting the potato famine in Ireland, the Bengal starvation in 1942, and the Ethiopian experience with intermittent famines later in the century. He makes the case that each of the three resulted from the ideology and mindsets of governmental leaders, racial perception, and administrative bungling or malfeasance. Segments of the book are not for the faint of heart, but a reading of this volume will open and inform the minds of all who take the time for it.