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Unjust Deserts: How the Rich Are Taking Our Common Inheritance and Why We Should Take It Back epub

by Lew Daly,Gar Alperovitz


Unjust Deserts: How the Rich Are Taking Our Common Inheritance and Why We Should Take It Back epub

ISBN: 1595584862

ISBN13: 978-1595584861

Author: Lew Daly,Gar Alperovitz

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Politics & Government

Language: English

Publisher: The New Press; Reprint edition (December 8, 2009)

Pages: 240 pages

ePUB book: 1502 kb

FB2 book: 1390 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 612

Other Formats: mobi doc txt mbr





Why should only a tiny fraction of our citizens keep most of the money .

Why should only a tiny fraction of our citizens keep most of the money made off this heritage if, in fact, it is this common background that gave them their success? . As our financial system lurches into an unknown future, traditional views of wealth and personal rewards are being questioned.

Author and journalist, Lew Daly, talks about his latest book, co-authored with Gar Alperovitz, UNJUST DESERTS: HOW THE RICH ARE TAKING OUR COMMON INHERITANCE. Author and journalist, Lew Daly, talks about his latest book, co-authored with Gar Alperovitz, UNJUST DESERTS: HOW THE RICH ARE TAKING OUR COMMON INHERITANCE AND WHY WE SHOULD TAKE IT BACK. pdxjustice Media Productions Producer: William Seaman. 2018 г.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Unjust Deserts: How the Rich Are Taking Our Common Inheritance as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Taking Our Common Inheritance 2008 by Gar Alperovitz and Lew Daly, also, Distributing Our Technological Inheritance 1994 by Gar Alperovitz.

lt;Unjust Deserts: How the Rich are Taking Our Common Inheritance 2008 by Gar Alperovitz and Lew Daly, also, Distributing Our Technological Inheritance 1994 by Gar Alperovitz. The book is an elaboration on the original article. That’s why a company like Apple should be using a substantial portion of its super-profits to support government investment in the next generation of innovation.

In this book Gar Alperovitz and Lew Daly clearly explain why monetary distribution is so lopsided and hubris rules. So if most of what we have today is attributable to advances we inherit in common, why is this gift of our collective history not benefiting all members of society

In this book Gar Alperovitz and Lew Daly clearly explain why monetary distribution is so lopsided and hubris rules. They explain the injustice of wealth distribution and how it can be eliminated to get the US back on an even keel so all citizens have a shot at a decent life. Surprises abound in this book and make for exciting reading. If you have always been bored by economics, that will not happen here. So if most of what we have today is attributable to advances we inherit in common, why is this gift of our collective history not benefiting all members of society. The top 1% of US Households receives more income than the bottom 120 million.

2008-10-17 Why most of the wealth that is earned comes in the form of a "free lunch"and why, logically, we must give most of it back to society as a result.

Unjust Deserts: How the Rich Are Taking Our Common Inheritance Format: Hardcover Authors: Gar Alperovitz, Lew Daly ISBN10: 1595584021 Published: 2008-10-17 Why most of the wealth that is earned comes in the form of a "free lunch"and why, logically, we must give most of it back to society as a result.

Alperovitz, Gar, and Lew Daly. Unjust Deserts: How the Rich Are Taking Our Common Inheritance and Why We Should Take It Back. New York, NY: The New Press. Alstott, Anne, and Bruce A. Ackerman. The Stakeholder Society

Alperovitz, Gar, and Lew Daly. The Stakeholder Society. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. What Is the Point of Equality? Ethics 109 (2): 287–337. CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

Unjust Deserts offers an entirely new approach to the wealth question.

Gar Alperovitz and Lew Daly. Written by Democracy Collaborative co-founder Gar Alperovitz and Lew Daly of Demos. Unjust Deserts illustrates how most wealth depends on our "common stock of knowledge," thus making today's growing inequality morally indefensible. Date of Publication: 2008.

Warren Buffett is worth nearly $50 billion. Does he “deserve” all this money? Buffett himself will tell you that “society is responsible for a very significant percentage of what I’ve earned.”

Unjust Deserts offers an entirely new approach to the wealth question. In a lively synthesis of modern economic, technological, and cultural research, Gar Alperovitz and Lew Daly demonstrate that up to 90 percent (and perhaps more) of current economic output derives not from individual ingenuity, effort, or investment but from our collective inheritance of scientific and technological knowledge: an inheritance we all receive as a “free lunch.”

Alperovitz and Daly then pursue the implications of this research, persuasively arguing that there is no reason any one person should be entitled to that inheritance. Recognizing the true dimensions of our unearned inheritance leads inevitably to a new and powerful moral case for wealth redistribution—and to a series of practical policies to achieve it in an era when the disparities have become untenable.

Unjust Deserts
This book offers up a valuable potential `society changing' idea whose time has come. The hard part is in deciding whether to honor the clear facts and heed the logic that the historical facts and philosophy would suggest
The facts are that the miracle of modern engineering and economic advance is not all modern, though some of it is. Our modern new gadgets and inventions are modern adaptations and improvements to ancient developments. The computer of today results from the abacus, and math concepts and electrical wizardry of previous generations, developed largely through combinations of past genius and government support of yore. They are refinements of electrical calculating machines from scores of years past. They use silicon chips that were decades in discovery and improvement.
The free market did not develop such developments alone, nor did sole genius. Government money financed much the R&D for wartime and other government needs. The societal infrastructure was essential in the development process over centuries.
The same logic holds for airplanes of aluminum, and for the development of and aluminum extraction and alloys in general. The beginning of our use of aluminum goes back to Archimedes day. It took government expense of large sources of electricity resulting from government projects like Hoover dam to supply electricity in huge quantity before aluminum could be widely extracted from clay and used to develop modern light weight air frames
It also took large scale public investment to develop and design many other features used by modern aviation to improve efficiency so that the planes can fly and perform sufficiently well to meet commercial and military needs.
The stories abound with the authors giving credit to social groups including government for many developments that came to us through the gifts of history
Rarely do the claimed genius inventors deserve credit for their inventions. Alexander Bell for example was a genius but so were others who simultaneously invented telephone. Bell won a race to the patent office, and so fame but only at the expense of failing o give credit to others who made progress lo this end long before he did. That would include inventor discoveries of electricity like Benjamin Franklin.
A vast majority of our modern technological, medical, aviation and similar developments trace their capacity back to a wide range of historical discovery such as math, geometry, language, government standards of measures, legal systems that protect rights and so allow developers to assert their energy and talent with faith that their inventions will be protected from interlopers who claim the benefits.
The publicly financed schools, colleges, libraries, trade and professional journals all play important roles in the creative effort. They do so at public expense. Yet the public gets no direct credit or remuneration for their contribution. Since the public includes most of us, and our ancestors from whom we inherit, the question is raised, should the public at large get any portion of the largess since the public advances of history have made our modern industrial system possible

The book addresses the question from a historical perspective as well as from philosophical and moral question. What are the `Just deserts' of the public for having lent the knowledge, the educational and the development of the scientific and technological base for all of our modern miracles?
If society is entitled to its just deserts, in what manner should it receive it? Do we need an estate tax to recapture for public benefit what rightly is attributed to public contribution? Would a graduated income tax be appropriate with the portion going to the government, and money designated for educational purposes so that all citizens have good schools with highly trained teachers, all made safe by rigidly enforced safety standards?
This is a very provocative book with highly relevant social moral questions that need to be addressed
This gave me a new way of thinking about income inequality. I wish everyone would read it. Especially those who think that they deserve to be rich.
The purpose of this book, as I see it, is to make the case that the vast disparity in wealth between the richest and poorest citizens is wildly disproportionate to their contributions and is therefore unjust. The case is built by
carefully documenting how technology and knowledge generally are cumulative over time, so that inventors or enterpreneurs stand on the shoulders of the entire history of their predecessors and make only a small marginal contribution to innovation. If the authors had a sense of humor, they might have entitled the book: "You Don't Learn Less".

In format, the book reads like a cross between a doctoral dissertation chapter reviewing the relevant literature and a legal brief. The authors want to convince readers of their thesis that the accumulated resources in technology , infrastructure, education, dissemination, et al are in effect a free lunch for would-be innovators. To make sure we understand this fairly obvious point, they assiduously mention almost everyone, especially Nobel Prize winners, who ever had a similar or supporting thought, not unlike a legal brief citing any previous case with a supportive or even tangential holding. I felt I was being submitted to an intellectual bludgeoning when they pretty much had me at hello.

The corollary to their main thesis is since society has produced most of the necessary conditions for innovation, society, not the innovator, should get most of the recompense. Since this is the most controversial part, I wish the authors had spent more time addressing possible objections. Their one foray into this terrain is to observe that our highest growth rate in US history was obtained with a top marginal tax rate of 91%, but the concern about curtailing incentives runs deeper and broader. This is a country where millions of poor and middle class people reliably vote for a party that blatantly favors the rich. I'm afraid "Unjust Deserts" will not dent that doleful reality.

The main value of the book is that it gathers in one slim volume all the arguments and all the opinions that support their observation about the true source and process of innovation and the implication of who should benefit. It places a firm intellectual stake in the ground for future discussions about what they call "distributive justice". The book is heavy going: you really have to put on your hip boots and wade in. But to reap a harvest, someone's got to do the plowing and plant the seeds. Personally, I feel grateful to the authors for making the effort.
Arrival timing of this super-illuminating expose of the US economic problems,and their solution, could not have been better. Wealth concentration increases, especially since Ronald Reagan's tax cuts for the wealthy, have brutally damaged the US. College tuitions have soared, middle class income has stagnated, jobs no longer exist, principles in financial dealings have been eliminated, the poor no longer hope,and injustice is the rule for these days.

Wealth disparity between the upper two percent and the remaining population has never been greater. A US nation of masters and serfs is at hand unless wealth concentration is drastically reduced. Outrageous amounts of monetary payments from executive compensation, capital gains, estate inheritance, and other sources to the already super rich have thrown any semblance of economic rationale out the window.

In this book Gar Alperovitz and Lew Daly clearly explain why monetary distribution is so lopsided and hubris rules. They explain the injustice of wealth distribution and how it can be eliminated to get the US back on an even keel so all citizens have a shot at a decent life. Surprises abound in this book and make for exciting reading. If you have always been bored by economics, that will not happen here. Every page contains a new revelation and is understandable.

This book is part of the spearhead for economic change in the US. It will not disappoint those who seek to renew this country and its promise.