» » Daughters of Britannia: the lives and times of diplomatic wives

Daughters of Britannia: the lives and times of diplomatic wives epub

by Katie HICKMAN


Daughters of Britannia: the lives and times of diplomatic wives epub

ISBN: 0002557142

ISBN13: 978-0002557146

Author: Katie HICKMAN

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Politics & Government

Language: English

Publisher: HarperCollins; First Edition edition (1999)

Pages: 320 pages

ePUB book: 1439 kb

FB2 book: 1924 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 799

Other Formats: azw lit docx mobi





In the course of her long diplomatic career Lady Susan saw sex around every corner. I had just had two years living in our beautiful house in South Kensington.

In the course of her long diplomatic career Lady Susan saw sex around every corner. Her brilliantly self-aggrandizing memoirs contain the heading, â?˜How I once diplomatically fainted to avoid trouble with a German swashbucklerâ?™. A government messenger, â?˜nearly as powerful at the post-houses as the Czar himselfâ?™. It was like a railway station because there were people in and out all the time, and we were having rather a good time living there.

Daughters of Britannia book. I think most of the the so-called Diplomatic Wives mentioned in Katie Hickman’s Daughters of Britannia would have sympathised with both Sita a In the Indian epic Ramayana, there is a poignant scene: Rama, the prince of Ayodhya, is forced to renounce his kingdom and go to the forest for fourteen years.

In an absorbing mixture of poignant biography and wonderfully entertaining social history, Daughters of Britannia offers the story of diplomatic life as it has never been told before. Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Vita Sackville-West, and Lady Diana Cooper are among the well-known wives of diplomats who represented Britain in the far-flung corners of the globe.

Product Identifiers by Hickman, Katie -Daughters of Britannia: The Lives and Times of Diplomatic . .345,66 RUB. Бесплатная доставка.

Daughters of Britannia - Katie Hickman. The lives of the women described in this book represent a lacuna in history. English ambassadresses are usually on the dotty side, and leaving their embassies nearly drives them completely off their rockers. While the experiences of their menfolk were recorded and preserved for posterity even as far back as the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, what these women saw or felt or did is unknown. Because, with a few rare exceptions, they were not involved in affairs of state, they were quite simply not considered important enough.

An interesting book and an eye opener into the lives of the Embassys abroad. I found the jumping of time periods and stories very confusing

As the daughter of a diplomat, Katie Hickman is well-situated to write about the lives of the women who, from the 17th century onward, have traversed the globe as partners of Britain's ambassadors. These women are more than simply bored socialites, they are indispensable companions, intrepid travellers and, in many cases, exemplary ambassadors for their country. An interesting book and an eye opener into the lives of the Embassys abroad. I found the jumping of time periods and stories very confusing.

Katie Hickman (Author). We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock

Katie Hickman (Author). We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock. Publication Date: January 30, 2014. Enchanting' - Geoffrey Moorhouse, Daily Telegraph.

Accompanying their spouses in the most extraordinary, tough, sometimes terrifying circumstances, they have struggled to bring their civilization with them.

Magic is at the heart of Hickman’s narrative. Her characters would not seem out of place in the oeuvre of Gabriel Garcia Marquez or Isabel Allende’ - Sunday Times. Mexico will not have been portrayed more vividly since Graham Greene’s The Lawless Road. nchanting’ - Geoffrey Moorhouse, Daily Telegraph.

In an absorbing mixture of poignant biography and wonderfully entertaining social history, Daughters of Britannia offers the story of diplomatic life as it has never been told before

In an absorbing mixture of poignant biography and wonderfully entertaining social history, Daughters of Britannia offers the story of diplomatic life as it has never been told before.

Index, notes, bibliography, photos.
no illustrations.......how can that be? not removed or torn out....the binding is intact.
A spectacular history the wives and sisters of English diplomats throughout the centuries. An eye opener to the sacrifices these women made to represent England abroad.
Fabulous book, very entertaining! Fascinating stories and anecdotes archived from British diplomatic wives, dating back to the days they had to use camels to travel.. would recommend to anyone.
The life of diplomat's wives and international political visitors is familiar to me; I had so much fun and many déjà-vus - just wish I had read this rich and amusing "report" at the beginning of my career, I might have been in for less surprises!
I live in Uruguay, so the part of the book that deals with the wife of a diplomat living in Uruguay (and the inaccuracies concerning that country) naturally caught my attention.

While one can sympathize with Mrs Jackson's troubles during her husband's kidnapping, this reader felt offended by the way in which Ms Hickman treats the Tupamaros, whom she (besides misspelling the name of their movement) defines as "terrorists" who were "dedicated to the overthrow of the current order of society". The current order of society was an increasingly dictatorial and authoritarian government, which in fact handed over the reins of the country to a military dictatorship two years after Mrs Jackson's ordeals, in 1973. That dictatorship, which was as bloody and savage as all US - sponsored dictatorships in South America, lasted for 12 years, ending in 1985.

While one cannot justify the kidnapping of any person, whatever its motives, it is strange that Ms Hickman completely fails to mention that (unlike the Tupamaros captured by the military dictatorship) Evelyn Jackson's husband was released unharmed and was never hurt, starved or otherwise tortured during the time he was held prisoner.

It is also hard to sympathize with either Mrs Jackson or the author when the latter approvingly quotes the former as saying (presumably of diplomats living in Third World countries) that "we're always in the middle of a revolution. They just wait for us to arrive, and then they get cracking". What a racist, patronizing, thoroughly unpleasant comment to make (and to quote).

This is not meant to be a review of the whole of the book, since I have not read it all. But finding such inaccuracies (and contempt) with regard to the country I find myself living in, I wonder whether there might not be others concerning countries that I don't know about. It should be taken into account that diplomats live in a sort of bubble, rarely getting to know the reality of the countries they are sent to - after all, day-to-day life is seldom a succession of cocktails and parties, especially in poor countries like the ones most of these diplomatic wives ended up in. While I respect personal suffering and tragedy such as the one this particular woman endured, I do not like to see a country pictured as a terrorists' haven when it is nothing of the sort and never was.
This is a great book in every way possible: it is fascinating reading, it kept my interest throughout, and it brought history to life. This is not a dull textbook, but a first hand account by British wives of diplomats in Victorian times. There is a particularly engaging account of the British Ambassador to Tibet before modernization and, naturally, before the Chinese invasion of Tibet. Imagine being a diplomat's wife and getting to meet the Dalai Lama! You will feel yourself to be there! I have never read any content to compare to it, the subject matter is entirely unique and difficult to find, the book is a gift to literature. I would compare it to Darwin's journals of his exploratory travels.
Because the book is a collection of first-hand accounts, it is, necessarily, the opinions and reflections of those who were experiencing these very different cultures for the first time from the context of their own cultures. I did not find these reactions offensive but fascinating: everyone has a different response to the same event, but the re-telling is nonetheless an indicator and eye-opening. The book would be very dull if no one gave their true reaction to anything.
I am not a historian and I found it easy and delightful reading. I would recommend this book to anyone of almost any age bracket. Splurge and get the print version for the illustrations.
The diplomatic wives depicted in this book were a hardy lot. Many of the stories brought forth the visions of the proper Englishman dressing for dinner each night in the jungle. Ms. Hickman grew up in the diplomatic service and displays much affection and admiration for these unsung ladies. The letters diary excerpts are interesting, sometimes poignant reminders of how isolated and far from home the ladies were.
The book has a peculiar organization, not by date or individuals, but by their duties. I found this annoying and difficult to follow. We meet a lady on page 6 and do not hear of her again until page 200. It skips between the 17th century to the 20th and back within two paragraphs. Consequently, I had never had a clear idea of who they were and when their stories were taking place.
Ms. Hickman is almost too discreet. Some of the incidents beg for clarification. (She is not a diplomat's daughter for nothing!) I didn't expect a tell-all tabloid style, but neither did I expect an almost Victorian reticence. The author clearly had done a great deal of research and took advantage of her own and her mother's recollections, but was in great need of a good editor.
A look at the lives of English Diplomatic Wives.I think it is well researched and has a lot of interesting info and funny anecdotes, which confirm to me once more that protocol is really a very unfortunate and unnecessary evil, of course the English actually revel in it whatever they may say.I think however a somewhat different approach to the subject would have been preferable.Instead of droning off the facts one after the other in a series of chapters, that often repeat the same occurence, choosing the lives of some interesting ladies telling us their stories might have made the book more pleasant to the reader.All in all it is not a boring read but it certainly is not everybody's cup of tea.