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The End of Commitment: Intellectuals, Revolutionaries, and Political Morality in the Twentieth Century epub

by Paul Hollander


The End of Commitment: Intellectuals, Revolutionaries, and Political Morality in the Twentieth Century epub

ISBN: 1566636884

ISBN13: 978-1566636889

Author: Paul Hollander

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Politics & Government

Language: English

Publisher: Ivan R. Dee; 1St Edition edition (July 13, 2006)

Pages: 392 pages

ePUB book: 1864 kb

FB2 book: 1852 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 232

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In my humble opinion, "The End of Commitment" should be on the reading list of every social and political studies student and faculty member in the free . These are same of the questions that Paul Hollander addresses in this book

In my humble opinion, "The End of Commitment" should be on the reading list of every social and political studies student and faculty member in the free world. These are same of the questions that Paul Hollander addresses in this book. If it’s not difficult to understand that those who lived in communist regimes often fled (when they had an opportunity) confirming the failure of those systems or because they felt threatened.

In The End of Commitment, the distinguished sociologist Paul Hollander investigates how and why those individuals who were attracted to communism finally abandoned the cause that moved them

In The End of Commitment, the distinguished sociologist Paul Hollander investigates how and why those individuals who were attracted to communism finally abandoned the cause that moved them. His is the first book to take a comprehensive, historically comparative view of disillusionment with Communist ideologies and systems, both in the countries where they were introduced and in the West.

Paul Hollander quoting Liu Binyan in The End of Commitment: Intellectuals, Revolutionaries, and .

Paul Hollander quoting Liu Binyan in The End of Commitment: Intellectuals, Revolutionaries, and Political Morality, pg. 11. Paul Hollander shows that belief in communism is a form of fanaticism immune to reality and logic that is more prevalent among those who live in free countries, and especially among idealistic intellectuals ignorant of realities of these systems. They convinced themselves that the social problems of their country would not exist in a communist regime, embracing Marxism and political systems which were opposed to the West.

of Commitment : Intellectuals, Revolutionaries, and Political Morality .

The End of Commitment : Intellectuals, Revolutionaries, and Political Morality. The seduction of some of the twentieth century's great thinkers by the most corrupt ideologies of the age, communism and Nazism, is one of the most intriguing stories in the history of that ill-fated century. In The End of Commitment, the distinguished sociologist Paul Hollander investigates how and why these zealots finally fell away from the causes that moved them.

The End of Commitment. Intellectuals, Revolutionaries, and Political Morality in the Twentieth Century. Published July 25, 2006 by Ivan R. Dee, Publisher.

Paul Hollander’s End of Commitment, on intellectuals, revolutionaries and political morality, is another, this time from the right. The many books written in the last 20 years about the German philosopher Martin Heidegger’s complicity with Nazism represent further instances of the genre. The masterwork, however, is still ­Julien Benda’s Treason of the Intellectuals. This book, written in 1927 by one of the leading French intellectuals of the early 20th century, may be regarded as the inaugural work of the line.

Paul Hollander (1932–2019) was a sociologist, Communist-studies scholar, and the author of From Benito . The End of Commitment: Intellectuals, Revolutionaries, and Political Morality in the Twentieth Century.

The End of Commitment: Intellectuals, Revolutionaries, and Political Morality in the Twentieth Century.

Paul Hollander, The End of Commitment: Intellectuals, Revolutionaries, and Political Morality. The other general category Hollander discusses in the new study is Western intellectuals who became disillusioned with the Communist dream without having to live the harsh reality. July 2007 · Journal of Cold War Studies. In these cases, individual personality counted more, and hence few unifying themes emerge.

Paul Hollander, The End of Commitment: Intellectuals, Revolutionaries, and Political Morality

Paul Hollander, The End of Commitment: Intellectuals, Revolutionaries, and Political Morality. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 2006. ISBN-10: 1-5663-688-4; ISBN-13: 978-1-56663-688-9. For much of the twentieth century and still today, Hollander notes, apologists and fellow-travelers have had the luxury of risk-free endorsements of radical politics that require no sacrifice on their part, seldom even any inconvenience.

Author, The End of Commitment: Intellectuals, Revolutionaries and Political Morality. Author, The Only Superpower: Reflections on Strength, Weakness, and Anti-Americanism. Author, Extravagant Expectations: New Ways to Find Romantic Love in America. Scope and Content of Collection. The Paul Hollander Papers in the Hoover Institution Archives consist of materials donated by Hollander in 2007, with subsequent increments. They document only a portion of Hollander's work as a sociologist and author.

The seduction of some of the twentieth century's great thinkers by Communist ideology and ideals is one of the most intriguing stories in the history of that ill-fated century. How was it that these distinguished intellectuals, public figures, and revolutionaries could enlist in the service of ideas which, when put in practice, proved repressive? Much has been written about the durable attraction of communism; we know far less about the disillusionment it spawned. In The End of Commitment, the distinguished sociologist Paul Hollander investigates how and why those individuals who were attracted to communism finally abandoned the cause that moved them. His is the first book to take a comprehensive, historically comparative view of disillusionment with Communist ideologies and systems, both in the countries where they were introduced and in the West. Relying chiefly on the autobiographies and memoirs of defectors, exiles, and dissidents from Communist states (the Soviet Union, in Eastern Europe, and in the Third World) as well as similar writings of major Western figures, Mr. Hollander examines and compares the sources and expressions of this political disenchantment. Concentrating on the moral conflicts created by the clash of unrealized ideals and actual practice, The End of Commitment sheds new light on the failings and malfunctions of these systems that were fully grasped only by those who lived under them. In a final, provocative section, Mr. Hollander explores the attitudes of some distinguished Western intellectuals who resisted disillusionment and clung to their commitment in the face of a welter of discrediting information. In all, his book offers a new insight into the patterns and processes of political attitude formation, persistence, and change in different social and historical settings.
If you have read any of Hollander's earlier books such as "Understanding Anti-Americanism" "Discontents" or "Political Pilgrims" among others, you will enjoy this book. It is more than just an update of his examinations of those who are so deeply invested in their hatred of the West that they are blind to the horrors of totalitarian systems and the genocides committed on their behalf. It is a good look at the phenomenon that Orwell stated so well over a half-century ago when he noted that some ideas are so stupid that only intellectuals could believe them.

This book examines some of the same pathologies that infect much of the Left today that Flynn does in his books such, as "Intellectual Morons" but does so with a scalpel instead of an ax. Hollander does a very good job of showing that one of the ironies of the left's hatred of the Western societies that they live in is that theirs is a religious belief system far more dogmatic than any of the major religious movements today. The systems they attack are far more open to criticism and change than any of the so-called intellectuals such as Eric Hobsbawm, who turns a blind eye to the millions murdered by Stalin since it was done in the name of destroying the society that gives him the freedom to be a fool, and be amply rewarded by fellow leftists for it.

a very good book.
Professor Hollander's "The End of Commitment" is an excellent, and exceptionally important book. He reports on the initial commitment of well-meaning people to an ideology that eventually forces those with a conscience to question the idea that the "ends" are so desirable that they justify using any means to get there. We have all heard National Socialists and Communists defend their prison camps and KGB and SS tortures with the retort "Well, you can't make an omelet without breaking eggs". Hollander tells us the story of those who eventually come to realize that people are not chicken eggs. That process of commitment, introspection and eventual apostasy, needs to be a part of everyone's education, especially those who consider free-market Western democracy a failure.
In my humble opinion, "The End of Commitment" should be on the reading list of every social and political studies student and faculty member in the free world. Prof. Hollander provides us with enough biographical material on once starry-eyed utopians which suggests that, whatever it is that drives otherwise sensible people to join or support the church of Marx, it seems to attract certain types most strongly. Intellectuals (writers, journalists, commentators) appear to be particularly susceptible. Reading Hollander might make them hesitate before committing to the church. Yes, there are the usual arguments about drawing the wrong conclusions from failed socialist states. They don't represent "real Communism" which is always some distant dream (to be reached after the slaughter of millions more innocents).
This is not a history of (failed) Communism treatise, such as Courtois's "Black Book of Communism", or Furet's "The Passing of an Illusion". But it needs to be on that "important books to read" list.
If you're interested in understanding what's happening today with the anti-war activists, why Jane Fonda made an appearance in Washington DC recently, and why it seems like the Vietnam anti-war mentality is impacting our Congress read this book. It also exlains why certain groups affiliated themselves with the communists in 1930s, and how their kids grew up as new left soldiers. Very interesting book that touches on issues that the politically correct don't want talked about. History and sociology at its best. If you project what the author's material suggests we are in for a very rough time over the next 25 years.
Why have some supporters of communist regimes stopped believing in their own country’s system? Why have intellectuals and others living in democratic societies supported communist dictatorships in the name of freedom and progress? And why have some of these supporters abandoned their beliefs, while others have resisted all evidence of the failure of communism? These are same of the questions that Paul Hollander addresses in this book.

If it’s not difficult to understand that those who lived in communist regimes often fled (when they had an opportunity) confirming the failure of those systems or because they felt threatened. It is more difficult to understand why some people who lived in a democracy denied the accomplishments of their country and, in a few cases exchanged freedom for dictatorship by emigrating to a communist country.

One such example was Sidney Rittenberg. Born into a wealthy family, he was convinced that the social injustices of the United States could only be remedied by communism. After belonging for some time to the American communist party and doing military service in China, he came to believe that he has found the ideal society in communist China. He continued to live in that country for thirty-five years, seventeen of them in prison. Even though he loyally served the Mao regime, he was imprisoned as a spy. Despite this experience he continued to believe in the regime, convincing himself that his arrest was a mistake. His faith in communism was such that he preferred being an innocent victim to renouncing his beliefs. Rittenberg was victim of the very system that he defended and instead of rejecting it, he served it with even greater devotion. It was only when, years later, his family was also arrested, that Rittenberg finally renounced his beliefs.

The book also addresses cases of people, such as Eric H. Hobsbwam, the famous historian who, even after the fall of the Berlin Wall, was unable to face reality. Such individuals remained convinced that capitalism had to be replaced by communism. Hobsbwam was forced to admit that the USSR failed, but he still believed in Marxism and it superiority over Capitalism - the source of all evil. By replacing facts with belief, Hobsbwam seems more like a clairvoyant, or true believer, than a historian, refusing to confront what was right before his eyes.

For these true believers, the means justified the ends – a better world – or they argued that the construction of this superior system was a long process and only in the long run would the ideals be realized. These mental gymnastics bring to mind the attempts of medieval theologians to tried justify the existence of evil in a world created by God – without, however, reaching the intellectual sophistication of Saint Augustine.

Paul Hollander shows that belief in communism is a form of fanaticism immune to reality and logic that is more prevalent among those who live in free countries, and especially among idealistic intellectuals ignorant of realities of these systems. They convinced themselves that the social problems of their country would not exist in a communist regime, embracing Marxism and political systems which were opposed to the West. They nurtured these beliefs while living in the bourgeois comfort of capitalism enjoying free expression. A good example is the Portuguese Communist Party that continues to support the exceptionally repressive regime in North Korea.
The End of Commitment: Intellectuals, Revolutionaries, and Political Morality is not only a great history book, but also an important contribution to the appreciation of democracy.
I highly recommend it.