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90 Church: The True Story of the Narcotics Squad from Hell epub

by Dean Unkefer


90 Church: The True Story of the Narcotics Squad from Hell epub

ISBN: 075354072X

ISBN13: 978-0753540725

Author: Dean Unkefer

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Politics & Government

Language: English

Publisher: Virgin Books (September 1, 2014)

Pages: 432 pages

ePUB book: 1949 kb

FB2 book: 1246 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 267

Other Formats: mbr lrf docx txt





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This the narcotics squad from Dark City it would seem. You either lap it up or it begins to wear thinner and thinner. The author was a member of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and he worked out of 90 Church in the city. I'm hanging on by a thread trying just to listen to the last quarter. Certainly violent and moving, this memoir will hold your interest if you like works of this nature.

One year has passed since we heard that Universal Pictures has picked up the movie rights to Dean Unkefer’s novel ‘90 Church: The True Story of the Narcotics Squad from Hell. The studio has acquired then the film rights for Snow White and the Huntsman director Rupert Sanders to helm. Meanwhile, Unkefer’s fictionalized memoirs 90 Church was published in May by Random House and now, ‘Breaking Bad’ writer-producer George Mastras has signed on to adapt a true-crime tale that’s based on the novel by former Agent Dead Unkefer

The studio just aquired the screen rights to an unpublished book by Dean Unkefer called 90 Church: The True Story of the Narcotics Squad From Hell, for Sanders to direct

The studio just aquired the screen rights to an unpublished book by Dean Unkefer called 90 Church: The True Story of the Narcotics Squad From Hell, for Sanders to direct. According to Deadline, "The upcoming novel 90 Church refers to the address of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics when it was formed in New York City to combat organized crime and drug traffic in the mid-1960s through early ’70s. While the FBI refused even to acknowledge organized crime, 30 agents stood alone against a well-organized Mafia and vicious drug cartels.

From 1950 through the late 1960s, America feared two great enemies: Communism and illegal drugs. While the espionage stories have been well publicised, the war against drugs was far more violent and has remained mostly secret. In New York City, the centre of organised crime and drug import, the offices of the newly formed Federal Bureau of Narcotics were based at 90 Church Street. While the FBI refused even to acknowledge organised crime, these agents stood alone against a well-organised Mafia and vicious drug cartels.

Imprint: Virgin Books. Though some names and sequences have been changed to protect identities, 90 Church is the real story of a young agent's downward slide into hell as he falls victim to addiction, deception, violence, and shifting loyalties. Published: 04/04/2013. From 1950 through the late 1960s, America feared two great enemies: Communism and illegal drugs. Imprint: Virgin Books.

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Breaking Bad writer/producer George Mastras to adapt the Dean Unkefer book 90 Church: The True Story Of The Narcotics Squad From Hell. You see many of today's production line popular writers, are using the same old body of cinematographic hooks. They always arrive at the same predictable conclusions. So personally being responsible for conceptual work that three conformed Academy wins came from, I decide to become a disciple of Master Mastras ver with. I will be at his beckon call of Master George Mastras

In New York City, the centre of organised crime and drug import, the offices of the newly formed Federal Bureau of Narcotics were based at 90 Church Street.

In New York City, the centre of organised crime and drug import, the offices of the newly formed Federal Bureau of Narcotics were based at 90 Church Street. You're getting the VIP treatment! With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart.

Mad Men meets The Wire in this gripping true crime memoir by a former agent at the Federal Bureau of Narcotics in 1960s New York

From 1950 through the late 1960s, America feared two great enemies: Communism and illegal drugs. While the espionage stories have been well publicized, the war against drugs was far more violent and has remained mostly secret. In New York City, the center of organized crime and drug import, the offices of the newly formed Federal Bureau of Narcotics were based at 90 Church Street. While the FBI refused even to acknowledge organized crime, these agents stood alone against a well-organized Mafia and vicious drug cartels. To survive against impossible odds, the agents used incredibly brutal and cunning tactics to make cases and bring the war to a stalemate. Using an ever-expanding network of criminal informants held together by secret immunity deals, the sinister reputation of 90 Church grew along with the rising body count. In 1968, alarmed politicians launched an ill-fated investigation into the Bureau's operations. Accusations were made against the agents, and now fighting a war on two fronts, the Federal Bureau of Narcotics was dissolved and its agents discredited. Though some names and sequences have been changed to protect identities, 90 Church is the real story of a young agent's downward slide into hell as he falls victim to addiction, deception, violence, and shifting loyalties.

Great story. I couldn't put it down.
Gripping true story. Hard reading because of the brutality involved. The author was obviously quite young at the time and made bad choices for his life in his pursuit of "justice and the American way." It demonstrates how young people can be drawn into systems they want to be a part of and then lose sight of their goal, especially if their judgement becomes impaired with drugs and alcohol.
I'm three-quarters through the audio book and it is wearing me out. At first I was totally on-board with the salacious mystery bureau that what I thought was a "Regular Joe" suddenly found himself striving to supplant himself into. It grabs you with a style that is up there with the trashiest pulp fiction yet it is true. Well, somewhere in listening to how to repeatedly be a totally immoral person to both family and government I began to question if any of it was actually true. At the half-way point it was so convoluted with each story redundant of the last that I started having contempt for the writer and his character. I'm not saying this is fiction, but it really gets so ridiculous and dirty that it just segues right in to the pulp fiction category with a protagonist one could never have any feeling for. This the narcotics squad from Dark City it would seem. You either lap it up or it begins to wear thinner and thinner. I'm hanging on by a thread trying just to listen to the last quarter. I'm wondering if I will?
A combination of both Eliot Ness and "The Godfather", this crime memoir takes you back to the early days of the fight against narcotics as it unfolded in New York City in the 1960s. The author was a member of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and he worked out of 90 Church in the city.
Reputedly a first hand account of the rough-and-tumble times when enforcement was as "no holds barred" as the actions of the Mafia families behind the drug business, this narrative is as gritty as the streets of Manhattan. Certainly violent and moving, this memoir will hold your interest if you like works of this nature. Undoubtedly this book will find its way to TV or Hollywood so read it now and get in on the ground floor!
Drug traffic in the 1950's? nonsense, the South American cartels weren't truly in business yet.. is what I told myself when ordering this book. Might a fun little yarn of the good old days. Boy was I in for a surprise, this is one of the most (if not the most) visceral, gritty,memoirs I have ever read. At times I had to pinch myself, to realize that this is not a work of fiction. Amazing detailed account of the heydays of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, and the man who lived through its successes, achievements, backstabbing, and turmoil.
I was hooked from page one. Just so absolutely fascinating. Very well written and hard to put down. What totally blew me away is that this is a true story. Agent Dean Unkefer tells it like it was at the Federal Bureau of Narcotics.
There may be a true story in this somewhere, but it is heavily concealed by the fiction. Poorly written, wild tale that reads like something you might see in a bad 1980s Steven Seagal movie. Don't waste your time.
I couldn't put this book down. The thrilling stories of the early stages of America's war on drugs were engrossing to say the least. What made the sparse narrative so fascinating was the twists of plot that had me questioning who were the crooks and who were the good guys. American history will never be the same at least as it relates to fighting drugs.