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Thinking in Time (the Uses of History for Decision Makers) epub

by Richard E Neustadt


Thinking in Time (the Uses of History for Decision Makers) epub

ISBN: 0029227909

ISBN13: 978-0029227909

Author: Richard E Neustadt

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Politics & Government

Language: English

Publisher: Collier Macmillan (March 31, 1986)

Pages: 329 pages

ePUB book: 1533 kb

FB2 book: 1562 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 306

Other Formats: doc lit mbr docx





This book does not serve as a history book, but as a book on how to use history. The authors use their insight into events surrounding presidential decisions and crises and look at the use of history in their decisions.

This book does not serve as a history book, but as a book on how to use history. The premise of the book is that certain tools can be inserted into analytical processes to increase (even in small increments) the effectiveness or success of a decision. The authors propose several mini techniques to facilitate their purpose.

Thinking in Time book.

Neustadt, Richard E; May, Ernest . Two professors of government analyze both political disasters and successes of recent decades to provide telling lessons on how to use history to improve decision-making. A dozen case studies are drawn in pungent detail both from the record and from backstage information gained from top officials. Sadly, the authors can safely assume a vast ignorance of history in Washington and the media. They make painfully clear that attention to particulars matters, that marginal improvement is worth seeking, and that a little thought is useful.

0 0 5 Kirjailija: Richard E. Neustadt. A convincing case that careful analysis of the history, issues, individuals, and institutions can lead to better decisions-in business as well as in government (BusinessWeek). Saatavilla e-kirjana. Two noted professors offer easily remembered rules for using history effectively in day-to-day management of governmental and corporate affairs to avoid costly blunders. An illuminating guide to the use and abuse of history in affairs of state (Arthur Schlesinger). Kieli: Englanti Kategoria: Talous & liike-elämä Kääntäjä: Lisätietoa e-kirjasta

Thinking In Time - Richard E.

Thinking In Time - Richard E. Yet we also saw that despite themselves Washington decision-makers actually used history in their decisions, at least for advocacy or for comfort, whether they knew any or not. We began our course in hope that, with help from government officials doubling as students, we could develop workaday procedures to get more history used better on the job by busy people preoccupied with daily decisions and other aspects of management.

For generations Americans have described and deplored the ignorance of history displayed by policymakers or, what is worse, the misuse of historical analogies. By Richard E. Neustadt and Ernest R. May. For generations Americans have described and deplored the ignorance of history displayed by policymakers or, what is worse, the misuse of historical analogies.

An interesting but dry book regarding the decision making process in politics. Richard E. Neustadt is Douglas Dillon Professor of Government in the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Using the Cuban Missile Crisis and the development of Social Security as two examples among several, it makes invaluable. For three decades an advisor to presidents, their aides, and to members of the cabinet, he is the author of Alliance Politics and the influential study, Presidential Power. Библиографические данные. Thinking In Time: The Uses Of History For Decision Makers.

This work by two Harvard professors wins the award for most audacious book of the year: explicitly addressed to ""those who govern"" and their staffs, it teaches policy makers how to employ the lessons of history to avoid costly blunders

This work by two Harvard professors wins the award for most audacious book of the year: explicitly addressed to ""those who govern"" and their staffs, it teaches policy makers how to employ the lessons of history to avoid costly blunders. Ronald Reagan and his successors, as well as the town manager of Bumpsville, would do well to heed their advice. The authors structure their course around a few successes and a bundle of ""horror stories.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Thinking in Time : The Uses of. .Two noted professors offer easily remembered rules for using history effectively in day-to-day management of governmental and corporate affairs to avoid costly blunders

Two noted professors offer easily remembered rules for using history effectively in day-to-day management of governmental and corporate affairs to avoid costly blunders. An illuminating guide to the use and abuse of history in affairs of state" (Arthur Schlesinger).

by Richard E. Neustadt, Ernest R. May (With)Richard E. Two noted professors offer easily remembered rules for using history effectively in day-to-day management of governmental and corporate affairs to avoid costly blunders

by Richard E.

For nearly a decade distinguished scholars Richard Neustadt and Ernest May of Harvard's Kennedy School of Government have taught an unusual and influential course for high-level public officials and their aides, showing them how to make practical use of history in day-to-day decision making and management. And while the pioneering methods they have developed and introduced through their course are based on decision processes in government, their techniques can prove valuable in the upper echelons of business and industry as well. Now, in this long-awaited book, Neustadt and May describe their methods in full.
This book was our second in a voluntary squadron book club led by our commander in hopes of developing us into effective leaders as we move through the ranks.

I would like to give this book 4.5 stars; however, am limited to 4 or 5.

The authors are both noted scholars and advisors. The late (2001) Richard Neustadt taught at Columbia where he wrote the very influential "Presidential Power." Prior to this, he served as advisor to Pres. Truman, and afterward, he advised Presidents Kennedy, Johnson and Clinton. The late (2009) Ernest May taught at Harvard for 55 years and authored many historical analyses of WWI and WWII.

This book does not serve as a history book, but as a book on how to use history. The premise of the book is that certain tools can be inserted into analytical processes to increase (even in small increments) the effectiveness or success of a decision. The authors propose several mini techniques to facilitate their purpose. These methods are the fruit of several years worth of classes taught by the authors at Harvard. The authors use their insight into events surrounding presidential decisions and crises and look at the use of history in their decisions. Firsthand accounts, biographies and official documents provide further views into the decision processes the authors consulted. Then the authors show where the decision makers could have used history more effectively to come to better conclusions. The Bay of Pigs, The Americanization of the Vietnam War, the Cambodian capture of SS Mayaguez, SALT II treaty, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and even the reparation of Social Security by Reagan. In these, little political bias shines through.

The authors differentiate between effective use and common use of history. They propose that the majority that uses history in decision making use it incorrectly. Problems arise in inappropriate analogies and a tendency to move too quickly to act. These must be overcome and replaced with the simple-to-use and easy to remember techniques.

The authors being Harvard professors may turn some off to this text; however, the verbiage is not pretentious or overly scholarly. The concepts of the book are proposed in a straight-forward manner and repeated with a patience that seemed to underscore the importance with which the authors see this topic.

Why subtract 1/2 star? At times, it seemed the authors belabored points. They repeated themselves often and their techniques become slightly convoluted in the last quarter of the book. Also, the authors placed the conclusion (summary) a chapter too early. After the conclusion, the authors wrote about the importance of thinking of time as a stream or continuum. This is a concept that is important but seems out of place with the rest of the text.

The concept that those who do not study history are doomed to repeat it. That includes looking at the methods used in reaching decisions, and this book serves well as a means of gathering insight into decision making history. This book is highly recommended to those in leadership positions.
I read this book when it was first published and have reread it a few times since. Although the instances used in the book are dated, the message is still relavent. Bought a copy form my college age grandaughter because I did not want to part with mine.
Historically rich accounts supporting some worthy ideas for contemplation. Not a recipe for making decisions in all realms. But something worthwhile of consideration.
This is a great guide for a government staffer. If what you do is help a senior executive decision maker there are a number of cases and examples of how history can be used properly to aid decision making.
Neustadt and May taught a classic course at the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government and this is the text that resulted.

I find it extremely useful in my own work. Worth reading for anyone who helps a senior leader make decisions and take action.
This book discusses various methods and frameworks for better use of history in the decision making process. Although the targeted group is officeholders, many of the tips are suitable for ordinary citizens. Making comparison with the past. finding similarities and differences and analyzing the source of information are three valuable skills thoroughly delivered in the book. Written in 1986, this work is a bit outdated in my opinion in terms of case studies. Some parts are abstract and takes time to understand.
This is a great read with many thought provoking details and orientations. I highly recommend this read by two noted Historians !!!!
A very useful account of real world samples of time critical decisions strategies. Worth a careful look.
The book describe how the clients of the intelligence community use history to support and make decisions. It further explains the how of using history to do better analysis of current situations. Excellent reference.