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The Ends of the Earth: From Togo to Turkmenistan, from Iran to Cambodia, a Journey to the Frontiers of Anarchy epub

by Robert D. Kaplan


The Ends of the Earth: From Togo to Turkmenistan, from Iran to Cambodia, a Journey to the Frontiers of Anarchy epub

ISBN: 0679751238

ISBN13: 978-0679751236

Author: Robert D. Kaplan

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Politics & Government

Language: English

Publisher: Vintage; 1 edition (January 28, 1997)

Pages: 498 pages

ePUB book: 1901 kb

FB2 book: 1973 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 482

Other Formats: lit mbr rtf txt





Author of Balkan Ghosts, Robert D. Kaplan now travels from West Africa to. .Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Intimate and intrepid, erudite and visceral, The Ends of the Earth is an unflinching look at the places and peoples that will make tomorrow's headlines-and the history of the next millennium travel writing from hell. Pertinent and compelling.

Having drawn a startlingly prescient portrait of the Bosnian catastrophe in his bestseller, Balkan Ghosts, Robert Kaplan now travels more widely and ambitiously. In this gritty tour de force of travel writing and political reportage, he covers an arc from West Africa to Southeast Asia, across a world in which nation-states are giving way to warring nationalities and where metastasizing populations compete for dwindling resources.

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Robert Kaplan in THE ENDS OF THE EARTH. The air had that dense and dirty fish-tank quality of the poor and crowded tropics: garbage, stray dogs, and crying babies. Robert Kaplan in THE ENDS OF THE EARTH, on arriving in Cambodia. However, the book almost compels the reader to compare Robert's conclusions with what is occurring at these ends of the earth in contemporary times, particularly in those countries that dominate so much of the news lately, . Egypt, Iran, and Pakistan. Plus, his insights could also be applied to countries he didn't visit but which are now in turmoil of one sort or another: Libya, Syria, Iraq, and Greece.

Wherever Kaplan went, he listened to the pulse of society, with special .

Wherever Kaplan went, he listened to the pulse of society, with special attention to the diversity of cultures and traditions. A very empathetic look at people where politicking has forced us to view each other as enemies. The book seems to be about some coming anarch Despite disagreeing with some of his politics, I generally really enjoy Robert Kaplan's travel books.

Robert D. Kaplan is chief geopolitical analyst for Stratfor, a private global intelligence firm, and the author of.From 2009 to 2011, he served under Secretary of Defense Robert Gates as a member of the Defense Policy Board.

He has been a foreign correspondent for The Atlantic for more than a quarter-century.

Author of Balkan Ghosts, Robert D. Kaplan now travels from West Africa to Southeast Asia to report on a world of.

He emerges with a gritty tour de force of travel writing and political journalism. Intimate and intrepid, erudite and visceral, The Ends of the Earth is an unflinching look at the places and peoples that will make tomorrow’s headlines–and the history of the next millennium. The Ends of the Earth: From Togo to Turkmenistan, from Iran to Cambodia, a Journey to the Frontiers of Anarchy. Author: N/A. Publisher: N/A (N/A).

Читать бесплатно книгу The ends of the earth. Издательство: Vintage Books (New York), Random House (New York). Полное библиографическое описание. Kaplan, Robert D. (1952

Читать бесплатно книгу The ends of the earth. From Togo to Turkmenistan, from Iran to Cambodia - a journey to the frontiers of anarchy (Kaplan R. и другие произведения в разделе Каталог. Доступны электронные, печатные и аудиокниги, музыкальные произведения, фильмы. (1952- ). The ends of the earth : from Togo to Turkmenistan, from Iran to Cambodia - a journey to the frontiers of anarchy, R. D. Kaplan.

The first book of Kaplan's that I read Kaplan's best book in terms of how it conveys his thesis about the West being inside a limo riding through the rest of the pothole-stricken world. This book is about the potholes.

The first book of Kaplan's that I read. It hooked me. The author travels to third wold hot spots attempting to divine the regions that will influence events in the next century. JBreedlove, December 12, 2005. Kaplan's best book in terms of how it conveys his thesis about the West being inside a limo riding through the rest of the pothole-stricken world.

Author of Balkan Ghosts, Robert D. Kaplan now travels from West Africa to Southeast Asia to report on a world of disintegrating nation-states, warring nationalities, metastasizing populations, and dwindling resources. He emerges with a gritty tour de force of travel writing and political journalism. Whether he is walking through a shantytown in the Ivory Coast or a death camp in Cambodia, talking with refugees, border guards, or Iranian revolutionaries, Kaplan travels under the most arduous conditions and purveys the most startling truths. Intimate and intrepid, erudite and visceral, The Ends of the Earth is an unflinching look at the places and peoples that will make tomorrow's headlines--and the history of the next millennium."Kaplan is an American master of...travel writing  from hell...Pertinent and compelling."--New York Times Book Review"An impressive work. Most travel books seem trivial beside it."--Washington Post Book World
A deep, detailed, analytical journal of a truly monumental trek across a disjointed swath of Africa and Asia in the early 1990s. Part travelogue, part journalistic report, part history lesson, part political/demographic analysis/forecast, this is a very well-rounded and multi-faceted work of travel literature, all presented in extremely well-written, concise, and evocative language.

Most impressive to me were the remarkably articulate accounts of the author's personal experiences, impressions, and observations while traveling through some of the most challenging places on Earth. These passages often evoked in me the swelling and intoxicating highs of the wonder, discovery, and mind/soul-expanding effects such travel brings...and, on the flip side, the discomfort, anxiety, and risks that come with visiting such places, which, while being experienced can be unpleasant in the extreme, in retrospect often become key aspects of the journey.

The author doesn't waste any words. The amount of detail and information packed into these 440+ pages is overwhelming and frustratingly impossible to fully absorb, but even if a few bits and factoids manage to stick, it's a valuable endeavor. For me, I'm left less with all the specifics and minutiae (of which there is a lot here) and more with an overall sense of these places, how they compare and how they differ. The author does a very good job capturing the essence and "feel" of each new place and region he transitions into, weaving them all into a coherent, flowing narrative. I found it an extremely engaging read and a valuable insight into places I dream of one day having the opportunity to see and experience for myself.

In short, a truly impressive and expansive work of travel writing, giving an in-depth glimpse into, and overview of, a slew of important and fascinating lands many of us will unfortunately never get to experience for ourselves.

(Countries visited and documented in this book are: Ivory Coast, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Togo, Ghana, Egypt, Turkey, Azerbaijan, Iran, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, China, Pakistan, India, Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia.)
This is a classic, first written in 1997 and now available on Kindle. Must be a bit dated now in 2015, but I think this is a book still worth reading.

In this narrative, Robert D. Kaplan travels through Africa, the Middle East, and central Europe, and writes about the places (not about his travel per se, but about the places). He has a penchant for seeking out the poor, the slums, the places and people who are among the "bottom billion", those left behind by the wonders of globalization. The opening section, on West Africa, is particularly riveting and disturbing. Kaplan has been criticized precisely for this penchant for seeking out the poorest and most desperate of places. But I think reading Kaplan is a worthwhile antidote for reading cheerleaders like Tom Friedman ("The Lexus and the Olive Tree") who gush about how globalization and growth will lift the whole world out of poverty. Kaplan reminds us that there are many left behind by this process of globalization.

The other criticism of Kaplan is that he's superficial. Let me speak to that. For those of us who don't have the time & money to actually travel around the world, the best we can do is read about it. So I do, and I find reading Kaplan to be interesting and informative. He gives some sense of what it'd be like if I were actually to go to those places. Superficial? Well, probably yes, but necessarily so. The world is incredibly complex, and after all how deep an understanding can one obtain of a place by travelling through it? I think Kaplan does as well as one can do in such an enterprise. In any case I think such a criticism misses the point of the book. The point of the book is not to do an in-depth analysis of every single country he visits. The point is more global than that: To highlight the fact that the process of globalization and growth is highly unequal, and there are billions left behind in dire poverty. Kaplan's book does an admirable job in that regard. He writes well, and what he writes is thought-provoking. A worthwhile read.