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Lord Leverhulme's Ghosts: Colonial Exploitation in the Congo epub

by Martin Thom,Adam Hochschild,Jules Marchal


Lord Leverhulme's Ghosts: Colonial Exploitation in the Congo epub

ISBN: 1844672395

ISBN13: 978-1844672394

Author: Martin Thom,Adam Hochschild,Jules Marchal

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Politics & Government

Language: English

Publisher: Verso (June 17, 2008)

Pages: 244 pages

ePUB book: 1501 kb

FB2 book: 1252 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 135

Other Formats: txt lrf lit docx





Lord Leverhulme’s Ghosts. Colonial Exploitation in the Congo. The territory that Jules Marchal writes about in this book has had one of the most violent and unhappy histories of any on the African continent.

Lord Leverhulme’s Ghosts. Translated by Martin Thom. Introduced by Adam Hochschild. First published by Verso 2008. Parts of that history have become better known in recent years, but not the chapter of it that he tells here, involving the raw materials that fed the factories of the great Lever Brothers soap empire.

by Jules Marchal (Author), Adam Hochschild (Introduction), Martin Thom (Translator) & 0 more. In the early twentieth century, the worldwide rubber boom led British enterpreneur Lord Leverhulme to the Belgian Congo

by Jules Marchal (Author), Adam Hochschild (Introduction), Martin Thom (Translator) & 0 more. In the early twentieth century, the worldwide rubber boom led British enterpreneur Lord Leverhulme to the Belgian Congo.

Lord Leverhulme's Ghosts book. In the early twentieth century, the worldwide rubber boom led British entrepreneur Lord Leverhulme to the Belgian Congo.

With an extensive introduction by Adam Hochschild, "Lord Leverhulme's Ghosts" is an important and urgently . Marchal was a Belgian diplomat who served in the Congo.

See all Product description. This volume examines the role of William Lever, the soap magnate from Port Sunlight in Liverpool who later became Lord Leverhulme.

Lord Leverhulme's ghosts: colonial exploitation in the Congo, London: Verso, 2008. Translated by Martin Thom from the French Travail forcé pour l'huile de palme de Lord Leverhulme. Introduction by Adam Hochschild. Guy Vanthemsche (2006). The historiography of Belgian colonialism in the Congo". Europe and the world in European historiography. PLUS-Pisa University Press. by Jules Marchal Translated by Martin Thom Introduction by Adam Hochschild. His capacious narrative is both disturbing and fascinating.

Translated by Martin Thom, with an introduction by Adam Hochschild. New York and London: Verso, 2008. Volume 48 Issue 3 - Angus Mitchell. Got it. We value your privacy.

About Lord Leverhulme’s Ghosts.

Lord Leverhulme's Ghosts: Colonial Exploitation in the Congo. ISBN 978-1-84467-239-4. Marchal, Jules (2008). Lord Leverhulme's Ghosts: Colonial Exploitation in the Congo. Rich, Jeremy (Spring 2009)

In the early twentieth century, the worldwide rubber boom led British enterpreneur Lord Leverhulme to the Belgian Congo. Warmly welcomed by the murderous regime of King Leopold II, Leverhulme set up a private kingdom reliant on the horrific Belgian system of forced labor, a program that reduced the population of Congo by half and accounted for more deaths than the Nazi Holocaust. In this definitive, meticulously researched history, Jules Marchal exposes the nature of forced labor under Lord Leverhulme’s rule and the appalling conditions imposed upon the people of Congo. With an extensive introduction by Adam Hochschild, Lord Leverhulme’s Ghosts is an important and urgently needed account of a laboratory of colonial exploitation.
Appears to be very well researched, and what is missing appears being withold.... it surprises me the amount of companies that have survived through time without any shame on their doings, Lever being one of them....
This is a great manual for understanding the colonial discourse and oppression surrounding the origins of the oil palm industry.
In this fascinating book, introduced by Adam Hochschild, author of King Leopold's Ghost and Bury the Chains, Jules Marchal shows in detail the atrocities that colonialism brought to the Congo. The Congo was and is cursed with great natural riches - palm oil, rubber, copper, tin, gold, uranium, coltan, timber and diamonds.

Marchal was a Belgian diplomat who served in the Congo. He spent 20 years researching forced labour there, producing four volumes on the 19th century, when King Leopold of Belgium owned the Congo, and three volumes covering 1910 to 1945. This volume examines the role of William Lever, the soap magnate from Port Sunlight in Liverpool who later became Lord Leverhulme. His company, Lever Brothers (now part of Unilever), exploited the Congo's palm oil to make soap.

In the late 19th century, Belgium forced men to get the oil by taking the women hostage. This gross exploitation caused a 50% death rate - ten million Congolese people were killed. King Leopold destroyed much of the evidence, ordering the Congo State archives to be burned.

In the 20th century, the Belgian state still forcibly recruited Congolese workers including women and children as young as five, and used prison to reinforce compulsory labour contracts, renewed automatically. Lever helped to enforce this vile system. Marchal describes `the triangle of State, Catholic missions and companies'. The practice of forced labour continued until independence in 1960. There was similar serfdom in Portugal's Angola, Germany's Cameroons and France's Equatorial Africa.

The exploiters made a show of philanthropy but in reality, as a director of the Compagnie du Kasai said, "You must remember that we are a commercial company not a philanthropic enterprise, and that our shareholders will not ask us if we have taken good care of the natives but what dividends we have earned them."

Naturally, the Congolese people constantly rebelled against their oppressors. In the 1931 revolt, 550 were killed, and Belgian forces tortured to death many prisoners. Only one Belgian soldier was killed, since "we have got the Maxim gun and they have not."

Still today, the Congo's riches attract predators. Since 1997, four million Congolese have been killed in wars for resources, in which a US-British ally, the Rwandan state, has repeatedly attacked the Congo.