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The Year the Dream Died: Revisiting 1968 in America epub

by David Halberstam,Jules Witcover


The Year the Dream Died: Revisiting 1968 in America epub

ISBN: 0446674710

ISBN13: 978-0446674713

Author: David Halberstam,Jules Witcover

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Politics & Government

Language: English

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing; 1st edition (June 1, 1998)

Pages: 512 pages

ePUB book: 1466 kb

FB2 book: 1796 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 383

Other Formats: mbr lit doc lrf





The year is 1968 & for millions of Americans the dream of a nation facing up to basic problems at home & abroad were .

The year is 1968 & for millions of Americans the dream of a nation facing up to basic problems at home & abroad were shattered. Witcover points to the Kennedy assassination in 1963 as the point where things began to sour. As Daniel Patrick Moynihan, future Senator of New York, then assistant secretary of Labour said in the wake of JFK's death, "We'll laugh again.

David Halberstam (Foreword by. I was 18 in 1968, the year I graduated from high school and went to college.

The assassination of Kennedy & Luther King, the Tet offensive in Vietnam, campus riots & the election of Nixon. The year is 1968 & for millions of Americans the dream of a nation facing up to basic problems at home & abroad were shattered. It was the year that I met my wife to be. It was also the year the Robert Kennedy was shot and Martin Luther King assasinated.

I lived 68. I read every word. Brought me back and now I really miss those days. It was the best of times and the worst of times. Let's live 68 in 08. Download (pdf, . 3 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

The year is 1968 & for millions of Americans the dream of a nation facing . books than,say David Halberstam's 'The 50's'

The year is 1968 & for millions of Americans the dream of a nation facing up to basic problems at home & abroad were shattered. Something was amiss on the political left in 1968 and it wasn't RFK and MLK's murders alone but a deeper shift in the public's view of the Democrats and what they could offer a nation in transition. books than,say David Halberstam's 'The 50's'

Jules Witcover, longtime political columnist for the Baltimore Sun, focuses on the Presidential campaign, but spices his .

And having covered the campaign as a young reporter, Witcover adds personal anecdotes that offer invaluable insight into this wild year. January: the onset of the Tet offensive. February: the idealism of Eugene McCarthy's New Hampshire primary campaign. Witcover seems to have interviewed or read the memoirs of every major player.

Book Format: Paperback The year is 1968 & for millions of Americans the dream of a nation facing up to basic problems at home & abroad were shattered.

Book Format: Paperback. Prominent journalist Jules Witcover looks at the most pivotal year in modern American history, and its irrevocable consequences for today's society. The assassination of Kennedy & Luther King, the Tet offensive in Vietnam, campus riots & the election of Nixon. Grand Central Publishing.

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Authors: Jules Witcover David Halberstam. Feel free to highlight your textbook rentals. Included with your book. The year is 1968 & for millions of Americans the dream of a nation facing up to basic problems at home & abroad were shattered

Authors: Jules Witcover David Halberstam. Free shipping on rental returns. 21-day refund guarantee Learn More. Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee.

The Year the Dream Died: Revisiting 1968 in America, Warner Books (1997). Crapshoot: Rolling the Dice on the Vice Presidency, Crown Publishers (1992). The Main Chance: A Novel, Viking Press (1979). Marathon: The Pursuit of the Presidency 1972-1976, Viking Press (1977), an exhaustive and authoritative work. White Knight: The Rise of Spiro Agnew, Random House (1972). The Resurrection of Richard Nixon, Putnam (1970)

The assassination of Kennedy & Luther King, the Tet offensive in Vietnam, campus riots & the election of Nixon. The year is 1968 & for millions of Americans the dream of a nation facing up to basic problems at home & abroad were shattered.
Witcover focuses on the 1968 presidential campaign and in so doing reveals a great deal about American society. This is not a book that goes into American politics with any depth, but it is well-written so that the events he covers come alive. Witcover moves month-by-month through an incredible year selecting key details that hold the reader's attention. Kennedy and McCarthy are the primary focal points in his text for the spring, while Nixon and Humphrey emerge as the focus of the rest of the book, but all the other characters are also there: Nixon, Agnew, Romney, Rockefeller, Reagan and - of course - LBJ. The book climaxes (as does the year) with the Democratic National convention and police riot in Chicago. The details in this section move you from laughter to tears within a few pages - there is that kind of power to Witcover's writing. A weakness in the book is that Martin Luther King, the civil rights, poor people's, and Black power movements are not covered in sufficient depth to be anything other than props for the "real" story. If you are not looking for deep scholarship on American politics and social movements you will find this book enjoyable reading and you will have a hard time putting it down.
This book is a must-read for anyone who lived through these fabled and troubled times and is willing to endure Witcover's often emotional and always gripping recreation of the events of that fateful year. For those of us who were involved and are nostalgic about the people, hopes, and aspirations we remember from those times, it is difficult to resist peeking between the covers of any book written by Jules Witcover, a well-noted journalist and author who was on-the-scene as a national correspondent as the cataclysmic events of the sixties in general (and 1968 in particular) transpired. Although it was sometimes personally painful to re-experience by way of Witcover's Technicolor prose style about events that I either participated in or was acutely associated with, it is also humbling and encouraging to discover the degree to which he has accomplished this effort with such terrific accuracy, verve, and perspective.
Too often today one reads neo-conservative revisionist accounts of the sixties written by bow-tied authors who were likely so busy squeezing prepubescent pimples in the boys' room mirror of their local junior high schools in 1968 to really have understood what was going on or what it meant. Thus, they write essays simple-mindedly equating 50s style bohemianism with the beliefs, lifestyles, and perspectives of the counterculture, or promulgate the erroneous notion that the sixties youth revolution was a simple coda of sex, drugs, and rock & roll, or that it's the aftermath of the so-called "new-left" cult of permissiveness that is primarily responsible for the breakdown in contemporary American culture. Such silly, superficial & self-serving analysts of the sixties social scene would do well to immerse themselves in tomes such as this to gain a better sense of the times before launching into ignorant and self-serving diatribes.
The sixties defy such easy, unsophisticated, and facile explanations, and it is difficult to now faithfully recollect the various individual elements of those fractious times without a quite careful, deliberate, & objective search. Many of the conditions for better understanding are present in this book. Witcover describes the month-by-month progress of the year with excruciating detail and a unique sense for how to mix various seemingly unrelated events and characteristics of a particular moment to engender the faithful recall of its tone and flavor. He slowly & carefully recreates the stage for our understanding of how the social, economic, and political sensitivities of millions of Americans with different perspectives & beliefs collided into cultural conflict, and how the collective hopes & dreams of many Americans for a better nation were nearly destroyed beneath a flood of violence, deception and trauma associated with the events of the year.
1968 was a year of great pitch and moment for this country, a moment in time when the social fabric of the country was nearly torn apart, and it was indeed a tragic year in the sense that so much of what started out as positive, hopeful, and energetic ended as being negative, discouraging, and dissolving. It was, as Charles Dickens observed about a different revolutionary period, "the best of times and the worst of times", it was a time when, for even the briefest of moments, the social, economic and human possibilities of this country hung in the balance, when a certain indescribable electricity hung in the air, and when we thought we might just be able to turn this troubled and troubling world around. Then it crashed back to earth. Jules Witcover describes this year of such hope and despair as well as I have read to date. Read it and enjoy!
good book thanks
I lived 68. I read every word. Brought me back and now I really miss those days. It was the best of times and the worst of times. Let's live 68 in 08.
Excellent service all good.
You've no doubt heard of that phrase, "Born under a bad sign". Well, how about born in a bad year? That's the circumstances underlying your humble reviewer, but it didn't take Jules Witcover's 1968-The Year The Dream Died, to make me figure that my year was a rotten vintage.
Witcover points to the Kennedy assassination in 1963 as the point where things began to sour. As Daniel Patrick Moynihan, future Senator of New York, then assistant secretary of Labour said in the wake of JFK's death, "We'll laugh again. It's just that we'll never be young again."
That whole disaster of a year that was the third straight year of U.S. involvement in Vietnam was also a presidential election year, during which Democratic disunity and third party candidate George Wallace gave Richard Nixon a new address--1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. It also didn't help matters for Hubert Humphrey that his hands were tied in his election bid. He couldn't actively criticize LBJ, who was concentrating on conducting the war.
But the two events that spelled the death of optimism were the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy. The latter's death is covered in a chapter aptly titled "Murder of Hope." It figured. The nation still hadn't completely healed after the JFK assassination and the murder of these two figures served to scar the nation even more.
Nixon, Agnew, Johnson, Sirhan Sirhan, and Lt. William Calley were some of the dark forces at work that year, but the most ridiculous by far was General Curtis LeMay, that lunatic who seriously thought of using nukes in Vietnam and embarassed George Wallace, who tapped him to be his running mate without foresight.
My Lai demonstrated how brutally insane the situation in Vietnam had become. How could American soldiers actually contemplate massacring 567 unarmed civilians, when in World War II, they were considered heroes?
Other events covered: the riots in Chicago, the Pueblo incident in North Korea, the Prague Spring, the presidential campaign, and the student protests that inflamed universities.
Each chapter represents a month of that dreadful year, and at the beginning of each chapter is a brief timeline of what else occurred, be they deaths of famous people, e.g. Helen Keller, or opening days of key films e.g. Yellow Submarine.
However, at the end, Witcover argues alternative scenarios. Had RFK lived, he would have taken the Democratic nomination AND the White House, ended Vietnam, and worked with MLK to heal the racial divide in the country. Or if Eugene McCarthy had decided to endorse Hubert Humphrey earlier in the race, Humphrey would have defeated Nixon. All of this and more is soberingly reviewed in a thorough coverage of that fateful year.