» » Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits (Texts in German Philosophy)

Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits (Texts in German Philosophy) epub

by Erich Heller,Friedrich Nietzsche


Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits (Texts in German Philosophy) epub

ISBN: 0521265436

ISBN13: 978-0521265430

Author: Erich Heller,Friedrich Nietzsche

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Philosophy

Language: English

Publisher: Cambridge University Press (September 26, 1986)

Pages: 416 pages

ePUB book: 1148 kb

FB2 book: 1711 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 379

Other Formats: lit txt azw lrf





I found myself deconstructing the thoughts upon which Nietzsche proposed the fight between religion and intellect.

I found myself deconstructing the thoughts upon which Nietzsche proposed the fight between religion and intellect. Nietzsche 's peculiar charm shines through the constructive criticism of rationality,which brings a sense of relief while investigating the points that he so vigorously proposes.

Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits (German: Menschliches, Allzumenschliches: Ein Buch für freie Geister) is a book by 19th-century philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, originally published in 1878. A second part, Assorted Opinions and Maxims (Vermischte Meinungen und Sprüche), was published in 1879, and a third part, The Wanderer and his Shadow (Der Wanderer und sein Schatten), followed in 1880.

Human, All Too Human is a collection of 638 aphorisms divided into nine categories in which Nietzsche reveals his observations of human nature and exposes common misunderstandings humans have regarding philosophy, religion, art, morality, society, relationships, men and women. The book is divided into nine sections: 1) "Of First and Last Things," which deals primarily with ontology, epistemology, and miscellaneous metaphysical concepts.

Bibliographic Details. Title: Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free. This is a translation of both volumes of Nietzsche's Human, All Too Human. The first volume appeared in 1878, just before Nietzsche abandoned his academic life

Bibliographic Details. Publisher: Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England. Publication Date: 1986. The first volume appeared in 1878, just before Nietzsche abandoned his academic life. Subtitled 'A Book for Free Spirits', Human, All Too Human marked for Nietzsche a new 'positivism' and scepticism with which he challenged his previous metaphysical and psychological assumptions.

It is entitled: 'A book for free spirits,' and almost every line in it represents a victory-in its pages I freed .

It is entitled: 'A book for free spirits,' and almost every line in it represents a victory-in its pages I freed myself from everything foreign to my real nature. For more free audio books or to become a volunteer reader, visit LibriVox. human all too human 1908 librivox.

Description: Translated by RJ Hollingdale Introduction by Erich Heller Translated by RJ Hollingdale Introduction by Erich Heller. Manufacturer: Cambridge University Press Release date: 14 August 1986 ISBN-10 : 0521319455 ISBN-13: 9780521319454. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

NIETZSCHE'S essay, Richard Wagner in Bayreuth, appeared in 1876, and his next publication was his present work, which was issued in 1878. The Dionysian, overflowing with life, gives way to an Apollonian thinker with a touch of pessimism.

He attacked the entire metaphysical tradition in Western philosophy, especially Christianity and Christian morality, which he thought had reached its final and most decadent form in modern scientific humanism, with its ideals of liberalism and democracy. It has become increasingly clear that his writings are among the deepest and most prescient sources we have for acquiring a philosophical understanding of the roots of 20th-century culture.

Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits (German: Menschliches, Allzumenschliches: Ein Buch für freie Geister) is a book by 19th century philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, originally published in 1878. The book is Nietzsche's first in the aphoristic style that would come to dominate his writings, discussing a variety of concepts in short paragraphs or sayings.

Download the Nietzsche Ebook for free in full PD. Published by: Cambridge texts in the history of philosophy. Human, All Too Human - A Book for Free Spirits. Written by: Freidrich Nietzsche.

This is a translation of both volumes of Nietzsche's Human, All Too Human. The first volume appeared in 1878, just before Nietzsche abandoned his academic life. In 1886 it was republished, incorporating in a second volume two books of aphorisms which Nietzsche had published in the meantime. Subtitled 'A Book for Free Spirits', Human, All Too Human marked for Nietzsche a new 'positivism' and scepticism with which he challenged his previous metaphysical and psychological assumptions. Nearly all the themes of his later work are displayed here with characteristic perceptiveness and honesty, it remains one of the works fundamental for an understanding of his thought.
I have studied Philosophy for 6 years, and Nietzsche was brilliant, he knew 2 centuries ago what was going to happen in this world. His boks were all written in German and have been translated, but, some of his quotes are just so applicable to the 21rst century.
This is not really a review of the book which is a great mid period Nietzsche. Nietzsche pre Lou Salome when he was influenced by his association with Paul Ree. It's really the first book where he breaks away from Wagner but before the begining of his brilliant mad books that follow Zarathustra. The Hollingdale translation is great but so far the kindle version is bad. It's not a true kindle but a non searchable scan of the text, hence the cheap price. It's useless for word searches but if you're looking for plain text read its ok.
The following review pertains to the Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy edition of Friedrich Nietzsche's `Human all too Human' edited by Schacht and translated by Hollingdale. The current text is compilation of three texts, `Human all too Human' (1878), `Assorted Opinions & Maxims' (1879) and `The Wanderer & His Shadow' (1880 ). These texts were rereleased 1886 as a 2-volume set with new prefaces. As with the majority of Nietzsche's work these texts received little recognition during the author's lifetime.

First, kudos to Cambridge University Press for its the Texts in the History of Philosophy series with its objective of increasing access to important but lesser known philosophical works. This series promises to be an excellent resource for students of philosophy. This edition of Human all too Human is a helpful and accessible compilation of some of Nietzsche's lesser known writings. While translation is always a challenging and often a contentious issue, Hollingdale appears to have achieved an appropriate mix of readability and literalness - he is effective in maintaining the poetic feel of Nietzsche's prose. One minor criticism of this edition is the small font, while probably necessary to keep the text to a single volume; it can make reading less comfortable.

With regard to the work itself, Human all too Human is often seen by scholars as a transitional work in Nietzsche thought. And, has tended to be overlooked in English for reasons of accessibility (limited translations) and perception (not seen to add to his latter corpus). For example, Walter Kaufman the great post WWII popularizer of Nietzsche did not choose to translate these texts.

While clearly the themes evidenced in Human all too Human are further developed in Nietzsche's later work, I believe the text has its own inherent value. Though somewhat more nuanced and less polemical than his more mature work, it provides wonderful insight into his views on a plethora of subjects, religion, art, epistemology, psychology, sociology and culture. It is also a treasure trove of ideas that are further developed by subsequent thinkers such Freud, Jung and Heidegger etc. Overall, it is a brilliant, insightful and wide-ranging text - highly recommended for all students of modern philosophy.
To read and learn is all and then discern and call to mind the fine lines perceived of reality being human.
(My comments on Nietzsche are hardly worth noting; his fame and notoriety, his value as a philosopher and writer, will not be affected by one Amazon reviewer. I intend my review to be a comment on my own sentiments in reaction to the work, and also to reflect on the make of the book itself.)

Nietzsche is fascinating and thought-provoking. This book is a great primer for anyone who eventually intends to tackle some of Nietzsche's more cryptic or "heavy" works. It lays out some of the thoughts he will develop more thoroughly later in his life, and is helpful for finding orientation within his philosophies. As a Christian, I strongly disagree with Nietzsche's opinions about religion, the freedom of the spirit, and so much more,--nevertheless his thoughts here cannot be ignored or easily brushed aside, and his style is so infectious, compelling, and mystifying that I cannot help but be haunted by those thoughts, cannot help but respond and react and expose deeply buried sentiments in myself. Furthermore, in reading Nietzsche's "psychological observations" (what he calls "reflection on the human, all too human") there is much insight gained into many of the prevalent European and American philosophies present today. I may disagree with him on a number of points, but he is clearly a penetrating and insightful beholder of the world whose thoughts have been steeped into our modern or post-modern culture.

(As I wrote above, my like or dislike has no bearing on his indispensable value in the history of philosophy and understanding the present-day philosophies.)

I would recommend Human, All Too Human, especially to someone who cannot commit an intense few weeks of serious study to one of Nietzsche's later works. The observations are arranged in aphoristic style, and there are many different themes throughout the work, making this one of those philosophical texts that can be opened at almost any page and read at leisure. Some of Nietzsche's observations would make more sense with a background in early Kantian philosophers, along with Rousseau, Pascal, and La Rochefoucauld, the Bible, and Greek philosophy and tragedy, and a handful of other works. But if experience here is lacking, most of Human, All Too Human can still be read an enjoyed.

The Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy soft-cover edition is right on par with all of their books. Solid binding, nice white pages, pleasant typeface, clean printing; if the reader likes to pencil in notes, he will find these pages treated very well to make erasing effective and clean. The introduction is weak, but that's to be expected from these editions. Introductions usually should be skipped anyway.
Older translation of book which in my opinion uses words and phrases not often heard of in the current day and age. The rj hollingdale translation I have found is much easier to digest for ''today's generation." All in all I would definitely recommend to anyone who wants to take steps with regards to self enlightment. There's a free version of this as well on a website I think is called gutenberg