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World of Warcraft and Philosophy: Wrath of the Philosopher King (Popular Culture and Philosophy) epub

by Luke Cuddy,John Nordlinger


World of Warcraft and Philosophy: Wrath of the Philosopher King (Popular Culture and Philosophy) epub

ISBN: 0812696735

ISBN13: 978-0812696738

Author: Luke Cuddy,John Nordlinger

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Philosophy

Language: English

Publisher: Open Court (October 27, 2009)

Pages: 288 pages

ePUB book: 1177 kb

FB2 book: 1665 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 789

Other Formats: doc mbr lit txt





Luke Cuddy's and John Nordlinger's World of Warcraft and Philosophy provides surprising insights that will delight .

Luke Cuddy's and John Nordlinger's World of Warcraft and Philosophy provides surprising insights that will delight the brains of gamers and non-gamers alike. Before I was saved by World of Warcraft and Philosophy, I had considered attending a 12-Step meeting for my addiction to MMORPGs.

World of Warcraft and Philosophy: Wrath of the Philosopher King (Popular Culture and Philosophy). Luke Cuddy, John Nordlinger. Download (pdf, . 8 Mb) Donate Read

World of Warcraft and Philosophy: Wrath of the Philosopher King (Popular Culture and Philosophy). 8 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records as the most popular MMORPG (massively multiplayer online role-playing game) in videogame history, World of Warcraft is everywhere from episodes of South Park and The Simpsons, to online series like Watch the Guild, accolades and awards from game critics, and prime-time commercials with Mr. T. Inevitably, such a cultural phenomenon triggers deeper questions.

Popular Culture and Philosophy . Recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records as the most popular MMORPG (massively multiplayer online role-playing game) in videogame history, World of Warcraft is everywhere - from episodes of South Park and The Simpsons, to online series like Watch the Guild, accolades and awards from game critics, and prime-time commercials with Mr. Inevitably, such a cultural Recognized by the Guinness.

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Luke Cuddy and John Nordlinger. Chicago: Open Court, 2009. Packing a whopping twenty-one chapters into 252 pages, World of Warcraft and Philosophy is a fast and engaging, though occa- sionally choppy, read. Whether your primary interest is in the game itself, popular culture or ethics and philosophy, this book provides enough meaty substance and variety in topics to appeal to most readers.

World of Warcraft is the most popular ever MMORPG (massively multiplayer online role playing game) . A specially commissioned guild of philosophers tackle these and other hard questions in World of Warcraft and Philosophy. 'Finally, something Horde and Alliance alike can enjoy!

A specially commissioned guild of philosophers tackle these and other hard questions in World of Warcraft and Philosophy. 'Finally, something Horde and Alliance alike can enjoy!

World of Warcraft is the most popular ever MMORPG (massively multiplayer online role playing game) .

A specially commissioned guild of philosophers tackle these and other hard questions in World of Warcraft and Philosophy.

Wrath of the Philosopher King. by Luke Cuddy, John Nordlinger. Books related to World of Warcraft and Philosophy. series Popular Culture and Philosophy.

Recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records as the most popular MMORPG (massively multiplayer online role-playing game) in videogame history, World of Warcraft is everywhere — from episodes of South Park and The Simpsons, to online series like Watch the Guild, accolades and awards from game critics, and prime-time commercials with Mr. T. Inevitably, such a cultural phenomenon triggers deeper questions. When does an assumed identity become real? Does the Corrupted Blood epidemic warn us of future public health catastrophes? What are the dangers when real life is invaded by events in the game? What can our own world learn from Azeroth’s blend of primitivism and high-tech? In these lively essays, a specially commissioned guild of philosophers, including Yara Mitsuishi, Monica Evans, Tim Christopher, and Anna Janssen, tackles these and other complex questions arising from WoW.
Philosophy with a thin coat of World of Warcraft paint. A lot less than what I was lead to believe. Otherwise I don't think it's bad philosophy. It made think about many subjects for the better or for the worst.
Prompt shipping speed item came with no damage. Book is great and boyfriend and I are having a lot of fun with it. It's a really good intro to philosophy book with world of Warcraft references.
i was not too impressed with this book, as it is written with too much technical terminology. it reads like a college text book, and does not really explore the "everyday" philosophies of the WOW charactor player. It wants to compare the psycho-mentality of a wowhead to the psycho-mentality of a BA CEO. ( which in this case is totally inappropriate since most wowheads are NOT suedo-yuppies, but regular people.) comparing RL to WOW would have been more applicable, and what i was expecting more of. This book seemed to put down the avid WOW player, insinuating that WOW charactors reflect a hyped - up alterego that real people want to project because thier RL is lacking. WOW is a game. WOW is a social network of people who can ,for a breif moment, escape into fantasy that DOES NOT reflect real life, but allows the player to interact, fight, kill monsters, and do honorable deeds ( quests) in a safe environment that would not be acceptable or probable in RL. The author really needs to research and TALK to real people who play WOW.
Outstanding! This collection of savvy essays on World of Warcraft lures the reader into a Wonderland of Virtual Philosophy. You might cease leveling your toon and start musing about questions that a WoW Caterpillar might ask. Are you an Avatar or a Creator? And does it matter?

Luke Cuddy's and John Nordlinger's World of Warcraft and Philosophy provides surprising insights that will delight the brains of gamers and non-gamers alike. Before I was saved by World of Warcraft and Philosophy, I had considered attending a 12-Step meeting for my addiction to MMORPGs. Now, after reading this delicious book, I've morphed from Slacker to Philosopher! I'm contemplating the philosophical puzzels and social polticking that the developers have begun incorporating in WoW.

So why would a gamer want to think about philosophy and ethics and stuff? Considering that the storyline of most MMORPGs concerns the eternal war between Good and Evil, smart gaming makes sense. Anyway, maybe hardcore gamers want to get in touch with their Inner Heroes (or Villains).

I wonder if one of my personal heroes, Joseph Campbell, author of The Hero with One Thousand Faces, would approve? When I taught game design, I used Campbell's classic as a textbook as MMORPGs seemed to follow the prototype of the Hero's Journey. However, unlike film and literature, MMORPGs give the Hero infinite choices to make as he or she progresses to the ultimate levels of Uber. Choices that require players to use their Free Will.

Professor Monica Evans suggests that WoW players must often decide whether to choose Evil over Good and that the developers of the game are writing more content to force players to "think" ethically.

For example, when faced with a decision whether to torture a human NPC or give up some phat quest booty, what should a Good player do? (And while the torture was never described nor rendered, the idea of torturing a human--rather than just killing one--was enough to make players pause and start a Blog on the subject.)

Does it make a difference that the NPC your Avatar has just tortured will respawn in 12 seconds completely healed and a perfect victim for the next player?

That's for you to decide. After all, underneath our heroic or heinous Avatars, WoW players are, for the most part, human beings. Perhaps we'll learn to embrace our "Inner Shadow" by playing MMORPGs. Perhaps we'll decide whoever gets the best toys, weapons, most discoveries, etc. "wins" the game. Whatever! After reading this book, I think most gamers may realize that there's more to gaming than owning the best armor, mounts, weapons, or whatever won't make WoW more fun if we put Greed before Need and are blasted by everyone on the server.

Whatever your gaming style, BUY THIS BOOK! At the very least, you'll never feel guilty playing Wow again! It's philosophy! Your Avatar is a window to your soul, leveling is a ladder to knowing thyself, and there's nothing more important than that...says lots of Philosophers!
Besides, playing WoW (and other MMORPGs) is a great place to meet people from around the globe. World of Warcraft and Philosophy book is an absolute must read for gamers!
This book has been way too long in coming. Over twelve million people are now playing World of Warcraft, and another couple hundred thousand play Everquest2 and other similar games. All those wanderers of Azeroth, Norrath, and other decadent fantasy realms can now apply their arcane knowledge and MMOG experience to the equally arcane realm of Philosophy. This book features a great group of authors (both philosophers and gamers) and an equally impressive selection of articles that span the range of ethics to epistemology. Mayhem meets Metaphysics. Political philosophy is introduced through guild leadership insights. And it all goes down easily because this strange juxtaposition is leavened by a steady flow of humor. Interesting and quirky references abound, from Plato and his metaphorical cave to Adam Smith's description of the economics of cyberspace. Even Nietzsche makes a super appearance.

Monica Evans introduces us to the lore of World of Warcraft, discussing misdeeds and other noteworthy misadventures. Plato and Kant are introduced innocently and unobtrusively, yet I could feel the gentle increase of my intellect by at least +2!

Another highlight is Miquel Sicart's Warrior angst and consequent in-depth philosophical discussion of game play, game community, and game ethics. Again, I felt a nice increase in INT +2!

You could even call it a sexy read, as the ethical implications of flirting and role play are explored in the most unlikely places. OMG! I just got a boost in charisma +1!

This book makes the game itself more fun. After settling in to read for a bit, I rejoined my guild and found myself considering many things I hadn't previously pondered. Is the rogue really female and does it matter? How much real money is that epic loot worth? Does the game play affect our real personas? What linguistic influences will carry over into RL? What's the etymological root for noob? Tank? Or griefer? How long before folks are going to the doctor to report that their health bar is low?

A true delight for the thoughtful gamer! Belongs in a spot on the book shelf between Plato's Republic and Neil Stephenson's Snow Crash.