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Tube: The Invention of Television epub

by David E. Fisher,Marshall Jon Fisher


Tube: The Invention of Television epub

ISBN: 0788160788

ISBN13: 978-0788160783

Author: David E. Fisher,Marshall Jon Fisher

Category: Science

Subcategory: Technology

Language: English

Publisher: Counterpoint; F First Edition edition (March 27, 1996)

Pages: 427 pages

ePUB book: 1756 kb

FB2 book: 1902 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 729

Other Formats: azw txt mobi docx





David Fisher provides just the right amount of technical information with very simple graphics to allow the reader . Tube" repeats oft cited historical record that "Vladimir Zworykin became 'the father of television' when he invented as device called the "iconoscope" while working for RCA in 1923.

David Fisher provides just the right amount of technical information with very simple graphics to allow the reader to understand the importance of different discoveries to the advancement television. If you can understand an ordinary light-bulb, you can keep up with this book. That is a single sentence that manages to embody about four historical innacuracies.

Marshall Jon Fisher was born in 1963 in Ithaca, New York, grew up in Miami, and graduated from Brandeis University . His book (with his father, David E. Fisher) "Tube: the Invention of Television" was published by Counterpoint in 1996 and by Harcourt Brace in paperback in 1997.

Marshall Jon Fisher was born in 1963 in Ithaca, New York, grew up in Miami, and graduated from Brandeis University, where he played varsity tennis. He worked as a sportswriter in Miami and a tennis pro in Munich before moving to New York City, where he received an . in English at City College.

Taking us through the advent of "living color" and beyond, authors David E. Fisher and Marshall Jon Fisher conclude with a. . Fisher and Marshall Jon Fisher conclude with a forecast of the latest digital technologies and their impact. In the half century since its commercial unveiling, television has become the undisputed master of communications media, revolutionizing the way postwar generations have viewed the world. Yet almost no one in America knows how television was created, who created it, or how it actually works.

Tube tells the stories behind the invention of television and the intense competition to bring it to market. Devilish character sketches and comp "An engrossing, in-depth look at the history of the medium". David Fisher provides just the right amount of technical information with very simple graphics to allow the reader to understand the importance of different discoveries to the advancement television. Did you know that the FCC first approved a color TV system that would have required a spinning disk in every home set?

Scientist David Fisher (Univ. of Miami; The Scariest Place on Earth 1994, et. and son, freelance writer Marshall Fisher, chart the scientific progression that culminated with the debut of commercial television programming in 1941.

Beginning with an 1872 experiment on selenium rods that made British engineer Willoughby Smith imagine a system of""visual telegraphy,"" Scientist David Fisher (Univ.

Tube: The Invention of Television' non-fiction by David E. Fisher & Marshall Jon Fisher. Footprints: Life and Work of Wayne Shorter' biography by Michelle Mercer. John Coltrane: His Life And Music" biography by Lewis Porter. The Deer Pasture' Nature writing by Rick Bass. An Anthropologist On Mars: Seven Paradoxical Tales' by Oliver Sacks. The Bug' a novel by Ellen Ullman. The Golden Bough: The Roots Of Religion And Folklore' by James G. Frazer

Of hundreds of books in print about television, only a handful address the technical history of one of the great inventions of this century. It is not hard to understand why: the subject is difficult. Even a typical electrical engineering graduate cannot fully explain how a color TV works.

Of hundreds of books in print about television, only a handful address the technical history of one of the great inventions of this century. The number of people trained in this field is actually rather small compared to microprocessors or even radar. David E. Fisher and Marshall Jon Fisher, father and son, are to be commended for wading into the technical history of this hard subject and making it relatively clear and certainly exciting.

Guests:David E. Fisher Professor of Cosmochemistry, University of Miami, Miami, Fl. co-author of Tube: The . co-author of Tube: The Invention of TelevisionMarshall Jon Fisher Co-author of Tube: The Invention of Television. Guests: David E. co-author of Tube: The Invention of Television.

Harvest Book), Fisher, Marshall Jon & Fisher, -Tube: The Invention of.

item 1 Tube : The Invention of Television by Fisher, David E. -ExLibrary -Tube : The Invention of Television by Fisher, David E. -ExLibrary. item 2 Tube: The Invention of Television (Harvest Book), Fisher, Marshall Jon & Fisher, -Tube: The Invention of Television (Harvest Book), Fisher, Marshall Jon & Fisher, £. 9. Television, Society, Criticism, Communications, Industries, Books, Nature, Electronics, Politics, Engineering, History, Music, Science, Social Sciences, Technology, Media.

Chronicles one of the century's most significant technological developments in an engaging & anecdotal fashion. With character sketches, compelling stories, & scientific explanations that are easy to follow, the authors capture the brilliance, vision, & frustration behind the invention of TV. The inventors of TV were a diverse group of iconoclasts from different corners of the world -- including an Idaho farm boy turned college dropout, an eccentric, sickly Scotsman, & 2 Russian Americans. Traces their progress, from the lab. prototypes to the vicious courtroom battles for control of what would become an enormous market power. Photos.
This book has just the right amount of history and just the right amount of detail to keep you interested. I have an electronics background, but some books can still get too deep to be of interest to me. This one is just right. After reading this book you will have an understanding and a hatred of RCA's dishonesty and backstabbing.
Great book, used it for a research paper and it has everything I need it. It goes into a lot of details on how the television was created, by whom, when, and how.
This book does a great job covering the history of the invention of Television. Most of this is chronicling the life of Farnsworth, but it highlights other key players in the invention.

The book can get technical in a few places... which is good for technical people. For non technical sorts- you may have to gloss over a few pages.

I enjoyed it. It does a great job taking you back to an earlier era and walking you through the many challenges that were faced and overcome to bring the television into existence.
What a find! Most books that deal with the history of a technology are pretty dry and boring, even if you are a geek, but Tube is an exciting account of the history of television that emphasizes the human lives that shaped it. I don't think I've ever raced through a book as fast as I did with this one. So much is going on with so many racing to be first that you can't wait to see what happens next.

David Fisher provides just the right amount of technical information with very simple graphics to allow the reader to understand the importance of different discoveries to the advancement television. If you can understand an ordinary light-bulb, you can keep up with this book.

Did you know that the FCC first approved a color TV system that would have required a spinning disk in every home set? But no company produced any sets for the home so it went nowhere until the relentless David Sarnoff succeeded in driving RCA, the company he headed, to produce a color system that was compatible with black and white TV.

The personal story of Philo T. Farnsworth, a self-taught Iowa farm-boy who was the first to come up with an all-electronic (instead of mechanical) television system would make this book worthwhile if that were the only story told, but there are a host of colorful characters that will keep you reading.

I'm not sure if this book is still in print; I found it in a used book store but if you find a copy, grab it! There's even a chapter at the end to fill you in on the early development of digital TV, though that is a story of committees rather than personalities.
"Tube" is a scholarly rendering of a fascinating, important,
but largely untold piece of history. Unfortunately, the
authors failed to search beneath the surface of the
surviving historical record to find the true facts, and have
instead reiterated a false accounting that has been preserved
by more than than 60 years of corporate public relations.

"Tube" repeats oft cited historical record that "Vladimir
Zworykin became 'the father of television' when he invented
as device called the "iconoscope" while working for RCA in 1923."
That is a single sentence that manages to embody about four historical
innacuracies.

What's worse, repeating this false litany obscures one of
the most amazing achievements of the 20th century: that
television as we know it emerged whole from the mind of a
14 year old farm boy named Philo T. Farnsworth. The
Fishers' book recognizes Farnsworth, but fails to differentiate
his achievement from that of Zworykin, or to examine the
patent record deeply enough to unveil the true magnitude
of Farnsworth's contribution.

Philo T. Farnsworth paved the way for today's living room
dreams, but the Fishers' book treats his contribution no
better than dozens of volumes that precede it. For the true
story, read "The Farnsworth Chronicles" on the web at

[...]

--Paul Schatzkin
To those seeking an introduction to television history, it may initially seem like an accurate book. First impressions can be deceiving.
What TUBE gains in advertising space, it lacks in accuracy. To a reader with sufficient previous background, it will appear to have been written and researched on the quick, and it comes to several misleading conclusions that evolve into outright fabrication. The authors do not seem to know how to get out of corners they carelessly write themselves into. They seem only too willing to make judgements on technologies and events which they clearly have not fully researched. There are simply too many outstanding errors for Tube to be a dependable reference for historians.
Let's hope if Tube has been reprinted, that the Fishers have done more background research, and have fixed the recurring 'boo-boos' that troubled the version I read.
A 2nd edition (with corrections) or even an enclosed 'errata' page is long overdue. Call me cynical, but I strongly suspect that the errors would happily be carried through to further printings, (if this has not occurred already). I do not recognize the new cover, but I expect it is simply a paperback version of the earlier hardcover with no content changes.
This may seem strong, but the more knowledge you amass about TV History from reputable sources, the more frustrated you will become with Tube.
Lively, intelligent, thoroughly researched, Tube is the best history of its kind available. The grousings of certain Farnsworth zealots notwithstanding, the countrified genius of television finally gets his due in this volume. A great read