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e: The Story of a Number epub

by Eli Maor


e: The Story of a Number epub

ISBN: 0691058547

ISBN13: 978-0691058542

Author: Eli Maor

Category: Science

Subcategory: Mathematics

Language: English

Publisher: Princeton University Press; 1 edition (May 24, 1998)

Pages: 248 pages

ePUB book: 1464 kb

FB2 book: 1238 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 432

Other Formats: mobi txt rtf mbr





e: The Story of a Number certainly lives up to its title! The book begins with an introduction to logarithms, highlighting . Eli Maor wrote quite a few books about the history of Mathematics

e: The Story of a Number certainly lives up to its title! The book begins with an introduction to logarithms, highlighting the relationship between the arithmetic and geometric progressions contained therein. Then we learn how the enigmatic number e was already slyly peeking out at us, way back in the day, in the realm of compound interest. Next we have a fairly decent discussion of limits and infinity. Eli Maor wrote quite a few books about the history of Mathematics. They are wonderful in combining interesting historical insights with the maths per se, but on the level of a school program. I loved his "Infinity" book. This is as well extremely erudite and fascinating.

Maor gives human faces to fundamental mathematics, as in his fantasia of a meeting between Johann Bernoulli and . e: The Story of a Number would be an excellent choice for a high school or college student of trigonometry or calculus.

Xiv, 223 pages : 25 cm. The story of has been told many times, both in scholarly works and in popular books. But its close relative, the number e, has fared less well: despite the central role it plays in mathematics, its history has never before been written for a general audience. The present work fills this gap. Geared to the reader with only a modest background in mathematics, the book describes the story of e from a human as well as a mathematical perspective.

I have minimized the use of mathematics in the text itself, delegating several proofs and derivations to the appendixes. Also, I have allowed myself to digress from the main subject on occasion to explore some side issues of historical interest.

Eli Maor (born 1937), an Israel-born historian of mathematics, is the author of several books about the history of mathematics. Eli Maor received his PhD at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. He teaches the history of mathematics at Loyola University Chicago. Asteroid 226861 Elimaor, discovered at the Jarnac Observatory in 2004, was named in his honor.

Princeton University Press, 19 de jan de 2009 - 227 páginas. Reading this book had me wondering about the mystical properties of numbers, whether there was some elemental truth I could discover

Princeton University Press, 19 de jan de 2009 - 227 páginas. Reading this book had me wondering about the mystical properties of numbers, whether there was some elemental truth I could discover. Overall, the book was an enjoyable and illuminating examination of e, and a solid retelling of e's importance in the development of trigonometry. Ler resenha completa. Outras edições - Visualizar todos. e": The Story of a Number Eli Maor Visualização parcial - 2009. e:" The Story of a Number: The Story of a Number Eli Maor Visualização parcial - 2011. E: The Story of a Number Eli Maor Não há visualização disponível - 1994

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More than the story of the second-most famous number. Published by Thriftbooks. As I was reading this latest book I thought several times that the title was wrong. I think a more appropriate title might be "A popular introduction to calculus" or "The road to calculus.

Designed for a reader with only a modest mathematical background, this biography brings out the central importance of e to mathematics and illuminates a golden era in the age of science.

The interest earned on a bank account, the arrangement of seeds in a sunflower, and the shape of the Gateway Arch in St. Louis are all intimately connected with the mysterious number e. In this informal and engaging history, Eli Maor portrays the curious characters and the elegant mathematics that lie behind the number. Designed for a reader with only a modest mathematical background, this biography brings out the central importance of e to mathematics and illuminates a golden era in the age of science.

This book aims to give the reader a deep understanding of the number e, but also of other things that turn out to be related through the e^(pi*i) + 1 = 0 equation, like the meaning of imaginary numbers. It also goes into the history of how these concepts were arrived at, which is great because it shows the wild, purely intuitive leaps some earlier mathematicians such as Newton made, that in some ways had no theoretical support at the time, and which were often controversial, but which turned out to be incredibly powerful. So it demonstrates the courage of going with one’s intuitions. In that sense it’s about the process of scientific discovery and creativity in general.

I'm not sure who the ideal audience is for the book (other than me, a guy in my 50's who was a math major but does not have an advanced degree, and who works on things like spam filtering algorithms). It seems like you have to have a nontrivial math background, but not an extreme one, to read it. I think it could be quite inspirational for math-oriented kids who can handle it.
I'm only halfway through, but Professor Maor writes lucidly and well. The story is charming and the history fascinating. Some effort is required of the reader, but no one will be ordering this book unless they're already interested in math; highly recommended to anyone interested in math or science or the answer to the big question, 'how do we know what we know?".
This book is a fun read for the math enthusiast, in the style of William Dunham's books, most notably, Journey Through Genius. The story, full of witty flourishes and playful asides, builds in the same chronological sequence, demonstrating the development of logarithms and their famous "natural" base. While not quite as excellent as Dunham's books, Eli Maor's effort is a worthy addition to the canon.

As the title implies, the book catalogs the development of the number "e", the base of the natural logarithm. For me, a college math major, the nature and origin of this mysterious number were quite hazy. Born in the era of electronic calculators, I could not fathom the utility of logarithm tables and slide rules, which dominated the anxieties of science and math students for centuries before my time. This book allowed me to feel the pain of those ghostly legions who wrestled with these tools, albeit in a pleasantly blunted way!

Some reviewers have opined that the book gets off subject a lot, but I did not find this to be the case. All the subjects covered were necessary chapters in the development of "e" and the science of logarithmic functions. The book is full of historical detail and anecdotes, in the style of Men of Mathematics, or Aubrey's Lives, but offers more technical grit than those books, like the Dunham books. In particular, information about Napier and the Bernoullis was all really new to me. The development of calculus, on the other hand, has been done to death, and is probably more of interest to high schoolers.

In any event, the book is relatively short, so if the format does not appeal to you, you will not have wasted too much time on it, and I bet you will have learned at least something. I think this book would be a fantastic adjuct to the high school calculus course.
The author chooses to embed the discovery of 'e' within the development of the calculus, with many diversions to other mathematical topics on the side. I won't fault this approach, except to say that there are other (and perhaps better) ways to make 'e' appealing to a non-technical audience. For example, if the author had teamed up with an historical novelist (e.g., a modern-day James Michener), the end product would have been radically different, and perhaps much more entertaining. A skilled historical novelist could have embedded the development of 'e' within the cultural, religious, and intellectual turmoil of the Western European medieval period, providing the reader with a much broader perspective than the one provided by this book. That said, if you like mathematics (or if you don't, but want to get out of your comfort zone), then you'll enjoy this book.
Assuming you have only a brief introduction to series, derivatives, and integrals this book is a fun beautiful read. I have no problem with the title of the book. To understand the history of e you have to know the history that came before it. Maor does this beautifully and the math is really pretty easy to follow.There are nice very introductory chapters on imaginary numbers, DeMoivre's and Euler's contributions, and a summary of where this all leads to in the last few chapters. There is no way you can have a good understanding of wave theory. quantum mechanics, or numerous other applications without a love and appreciation for the story of e. It is somewhat scary how many people have no exposure to this beautiful story. Learn about e and see where it can take you. It is worth it.
The book is great but the Kindle formatting needs work. There are numerous typographical errors throughout this book. For example, the use of the capital letter "I" for the number "1". This problem is not unique to this book. Many of the technical books I own in Kindle format have this problem. I would suggest to Amazon that they either hire a technical editor or work more closely with the publishers of their technical books to do a final read-through prior to offering it to customers.
This is a great book with the equations to back up the story. Some people rated the book lower because of the equations, but please realize that it's easier to skip over too many equations than to move to other sources for the equations that really tell the story of mathematics. I wish books like this had a strong equation foundation. To fully appreciate the significance of these concepts, you really need the equations.