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Population Cycles: The Case for Trophic Interactions epub

by Alan Berryman


Population Cycles: The Case for Trophic Interactions epub

ISBN: 0195140982

ISBN13: 978-0195140989

Author: Alan Berryman

Category: Science

Subcategory: Biological Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (November 7, 2002)

Pages: 208 pages

ePUB book: 1959 kb

FB2 book: 1102 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 523

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For over sixty years, understanding the causes of multiannual cycles in animal populations has been a central issue in ecology.

For over sixty years, understanding the causes of multiannual cycles in animal populations has been a central issue in ecology. This book brings together ten of the leaders in this field to examine the major hypotheses and recent evidence in the field, and to establish that trophic interactions are an important factor in driving at least some of the major regular oscillations in animal populations that have long puzzled ecologists. Download (pdf, . 2 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original

Population Cycles book.

Population Cycles book. Start by marking Population Cycles: The Case for Trophic Interactions as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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Burt, . 2003 Site-speci fi c sel fi sh genes as tools for the control and genetic engineering of natural populations.

211: 56 – 65. Berryman, A. 2002 Population Cycles: The Case for Trophic Interactions. Oxford University Press, New York. Bondy-Denomy, . A. Pawluk, K. L. Maxwell, and A. R. Davidson, 2013 Bacteriophage genes that inactivate the CRISPR/Cas bacterial immune system. Nature 493: 429 – 432. Bull, J. 2016 Lethal gene drive selects inbreeding. bioRxiv DOI: 1. 101/046847. Burt, .

Chicago Distribution Center.

This book brings together ten of the leaders in this field to examine the major hypotheses and recent evidence in the field, and to establish that trophic interactions are an important factor in driving at least some of the major.

This book brings together ten of the leaders in this field to examine the major hypotheses and recent evidence in the field, and to establish that trophic interactions are an important factor in driving at least some of the major regular oscillations in animal populations that have long puzzled ecologists. Скачать с помощью Mediaget. com/Population Cycles: The Case for Trophic Interactions.

This book brings together ten of the leaders in this field to examine the major hypotheses and recent evidence in the field, and to establish that trophic interactions ar. .Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Main Author: Berryman, Alan. Published: Cary : Oxford University Press, Incorporated, 2002.

Recent collapses of population cycles in several species highlight the mutable nature of population behavior as well as.Berryman AA (2002) Population cycles: the case for trophic interactions. Oxford University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar

Recent collapses of population cycles in several species highlight the mutable nature of population behavior as well as the potential role of human-induced environmental change in causing population. Oxford University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar. Bjørnstad ON, Liebhold AM, Johnson DM (2008) Transient synchronization following invasion: revisiting Moran’s model and a case study. Popul Ecol 50:379–389CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Bjørnstad ON, Robinet C, Liebhold AM (2010) Geographic variation in North American gypsy moth cycles: subharmonics, generalist predators, and spatial coupling.

A population cycle in zoology is a phenomenon where populations rise and fall over a predictable period of time

A population cycle in zoology is a phenomenon where populations rise and fall over a predictable period of time. There are some species where population numbers have reasonably predictable patterns of change although the full reasons for population cycles is one of the major unsolved ecological problems. There are a number of factors which influence population change such as availability of food, predators, diseases and climate.

For over sixty years, understanding the causes of multiannual cycles in animal populations has been a central issue in ecology. This book brings together ten of the leaders in this field to examine the major hypotheses and recent evidence in the field, and to establish that trophic interactions are an important factor in driving at least some of the major regular oscillations in animal populations that have long puzzled ecologists.