» » A Common Fate: Endangered Salmon and the People of the Pacific Northwest

A Common Fate: Endangered Salmon and the People of the Pacific Northwest epub

by Joseph Cone


A Common Fate: Endangered Salmon and the People of the Pacific Northwest epub

ISBN: 0870713914

ISBN13: 978-0870713910

Author: Joseph Cone

Category: Science

Subcategory: Biological Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: Oregon State Univ Pr; Revised edition (October 1, 1996)

Pages: 352 pages

ePUB book: 1796 kb

FB2 book: 1315 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 606

Other Formats: azw lit docx lrf





The overview of the salmon issue this book provides is astounding

The overview of the salmon issue this book provides is astounding. For anyone looking for a clear, concise overview of the issues surrounding the salmon crisis in an easy to read format, this book comes highly recommended

A COMMON FATE: Salmon and People in the Pacific Northwest.

A COMMON FATE: Salmon and People in the Pacific Northwest. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. A weighty, cautionary tale about the Pacific salmon: 50 million years in the making, a handful of decades in the unmaking. A common fate: endangered salmon and the people of the Pacific Northwest.

Pacific salmon are born in a river or stream, swim out to the open ocean where they may live for up to six years . The overview of the salmon issue this book provides is astounding.

Pacific salmon are born in a river or stream, swim out to the open ocean where they may live for up to six years, and then as adults leap up rivers and waterfalls to return to their natal streams to mate and spawn. The subtle relationship between salmon and their habitats, which makes this migration possible, has been gradually degraded as a result of logging, the construction of dams, and water pollution.

Cone, in unflinching detail, and with a flair for dramatic storytelling, chronicles the ins and outs of the on-going battle to save the Pacific Northwest salmon runs and their surrounding watersheds.

One consequence of such thinking is the apparent fate of the Pacific salmon - a key resource and preeminent symbol of America's wildlife - which is today threatened with extincti Though life on earth is the history of dynamic interactions between living things and their surroundings, certain powerful groups would have us believe that nature exists only for our convenience.

One consequence of such thinking is the apparent fate of the Pacific salmon-a key resource and preeminent symbol of America's wildlife-which is today threatened with extinction Though life on earth is the history of dynamic interactions between living things and their surroundings, certain powerful groups would have us believe that nature exists only for our convenience.

A weighty, cautionary tale about the Pacific salmon: 50 million years .

A weighty, cautionary tale about the Pacific salmon: 50 million years in the making, a handful of decades in the unmaking. Cone also does his book - not to mention the salmon - a disservice by muting his clear conservationist sympathies under an awkward, ill-fitting cloak of reportorial detachment.

Endangered Salmon And The People Of The Pacific Northwest. One consequence of such thinking is the apparent fate of the Pacific salmon-a key resource and preeminent symbol of America's wildlife-which is today threatened with extinction. Drawing on abundant data from natural science, Pacific coast culture, and a long association with key individuals on all sides of the issue, Joseph Cone's A Common Fate employs a clear narrative voice to tell the human and natural history of an environmental crisis in its final chapter.

Book by Cone, Joseph
Joseph Cone's book, "A Common Fate: Endangered Salmon and the People of the Pacific Northwest," tells a story that combines over two hundred years of U.S. history with the prurient facts of salmon and political science. Cone, in unflinching detail, and with a flair for dramatic storytelling, chronicles the ins and outs of the on-going battle to save the Pacific Northwest salmon runs and their surrounding watersheds. The overview of the salmon issue this book provides is astounding. From all sides' viewpoints, from Gordon Reeves, a fish researcher and ecologist with the Pacific Northwest Research Station of the U.S. Forestry Service in 1988, to people like Mike Draper, spokesperson for The Western Council of Industrial Workers and Antone Minthorn, council chairman of the General Council of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Cone weaves a tale that can be described as nothing short of sordid. Elucidating the deceptions, feints and dodges of bureaucratic interests and what motivates them as well as he does the struggles, fears, and hopes of the environmental activists, Cone shows an in depth knowledge of both salmon biology and political policy, all the while moving his story throughout Pacific Northwest and salmon history. Flashback narratives back to the very beginning of Pacific Northwest history with the arrival of James Cook, Robert Grey, on through Lewis and Clark and John Jacob Astor provide a sense of historic perspective on the abundance and exploitation of this incredible fish. Cone chronicles the wasteful days of the Hapgood & Hume canneries, where, after a day's work, if the canners couldn't keep up with supply, hundreds of fish would be shoveled back into the water, wasted. He describes the migrant cannery fishermen and the disputes between gill-netters, those who used fish traps, and the canneries themselves, the strikes and violence associated with them as everyone struggles to take all they can in a living description of human economist Garrett Hardin's essay, "The Tragedy of the Commons." He describes with harrowing precision the two steps forward, one step back dance of environmental policy, as environmentalist minded scientists cross swords with policy makers and industrial advocates, as treaties and alliances are formed and broken again and again over the same ground year after year, decade after decade. He shows again and again the complexity of the issues, the difference between conservation and preservation, and the fact that thus far, in the struggle between fish and man, man has won time and time again, and that time for the Pacific Northwest salmon is running out. Though one review on the back of the book suggests that Cone offers up cooperation as the solution to the salmon crisis, in truth, "A Common Fate" illustrates the fallacy of cooperation between the two sides of industry and environment. The evidence he presents illustrates clearly that, as the industrialists call for a "balance" to be struck, in truth, the salmon are systematically being balanced out of existence. For anyone looking for a clear, concise overview of the issues surrounding the salmon crisis in an easy to read format, this book comes highly recommended.
Salmon , as a species , are no where near to being extinct, as this book would lead one to believe. Can we improve on the way we as U.S. Citizens treat our Environment? Certainly!!! Do we have the will to do it? Who Knows???