Orphanage epub

by Robert Buettner


Orphanage epub

ISBN: 073945031X

ISBN13: 978-0739450314

Author: Robert Buettner

Category: Science Fiction

Subcategory: Science Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Aspect (2004)

Pages: 302 pages

ePUB book: 1670 kb

FB2 book: 1506 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 615

Other Formats: lrf txt azw rtf





Книга Orphanage, автор Buettner Robert - (Книга жанра: Фантастика, Боевая фантастика.

Книга Orphanage, автор Buettner Robert - (Книга жанра: Фантастика, Боевая фантастика. Читать онлайн в библиотеке Booksonline. Your turns are coming. To Robert A. Heinlein for inspiration and to Joe Haldeman for that and for his generous humanity, my gratitude forever. Most important, to Mary Beth, more than thanks for all of the above and for everything that matters. We crabbed shoulder to shoulder down cargo nets to our landing craft bucking in the Channel, each GI’s boots drenching his buddy below.

Orphanage Robert Buettner For Senior Drill Sergeant DeArthur Burgess, wherever the winds of war carried him, and for all the other special ones. For Senior Drill Sergeant DeArthur Burgess, wherever the winds of war carried him, and for all the other special ones.

Robert Buettner (Author).

Robert Buettner is an American author of military science fiction novels

Robert Buettner is an American author of military science fiction novels. He is a former Military Intelligence Officer, National Science Foundation Fellow in Paleontology and has been published in the field of Natural Resources Law. He has written five volumes of the Jason Wander series, three volumes of the Orphan's Legacy series, the stand-alone novel The Golden Gate, numerous short stories and novellas, and the afterword to an anthology of stories by the late Robert Heinlein.

Robert Buettner’s best-selling debut novel, Orphanage, 2004 Quill Award nominee for Best SF/Fantasy/Horror novel, was called . Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Robert Buettner's books.

Robert Buettner’s best-selling debut novel, Orphanage, 2004 Quill Award nominee for Best SF/Fantasy/Horror novel, was called the Post-9/11 generation’s . .

War is an Orphanage: Jason Wander, left orphaned at age . You can find Robert's books at the following retailers, and wherever books are sold: Listen to robert's books.

War is an Orphanage: Jason Wander, left orphaned at age 17 by an attack from an unseen alien enemy, must fight his own demons before he can fight Earth’s. Jason starts off on a self-destructive streak that leads to being expelled from school, through foster homes and finally to an appointment with a no-nonsense judge. Book Orphan's Destiny.

Author: Robert Buettner. Mankind’s first alien contact tears into Earth: projectiles launched from Jupiter’s moon, Ganymede, have vaporized whole cities

Author: Robert Buettner. Mankind’s first alien contact tears into Earth: projectiles launched from Jupiter’s moon, Ganymede, have vaporized whole cities. Under siege, humanity gambles on one desperate counter strike. In a spacecraft scavenged from scraps and armed with Vietnam-era weapons, foot soldiers like 18-year-old Jason Wander – orphans that no one will miss – must dare man’s first interplanetary voyage and invade Ganymede

If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: G. Robert Buettner - - Orphanage.

If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: GO. Exact matches. Download (HTML). Читать. 488 Kb, en. Orphanage toc.

Orphanage Robert Buettner Acknowledgments Chapter One Chapter Two Chapter Three Chapter Four Chapter Five Chapter Six Chapter Seven Chapter Eight Chapter Nine Chapter Ten Chapter Eleven Chapter Twelve Chapter Thirteen Chapter Fourteen Chapter Fifteen Chapter Sixteen.

Orphanage Robert Buettner Acknowledgments Chapter One Chapter Two Chapter Three Chapter Four Chapter Five Chapter Six Chapter Seven Chapter Eight Chapter Nine Chapter Ten Chapter Eleven Chapter Twelve Chapter Thirteen Chapter Fourteen Chapter Fifteen Chapter Sixteen Chapter Seventeen Chapter Eighteen Chapter Nineteen Chapter Twenty Chapter Twenty-One Chapter Twenty-Two Chapter Twenty-Three Chapter Twenty-Four Chapter Twenty-Five Chapter Twenty-Six Chapter.

Hardcover edition of the science fiction tale.
One day my 13 yr old son told me I needed to read this book.

Due to his Daddy's influence he had read Starship Troopers, Armour, the Sten series by Allan Cole and Chris Bunch, John Ringo, Tom Kratman, and John Scalzi's Old Man War series. Mostly after 9-11.

I read the book, and every book since then, sometimes crying about the things Jason had to live through.

The power of the Jason series, among others, made him want to be in the USMC. Nowadays he is a 2nd Lieutenant in the Corps. Nothing makes me prouder than being able to influence him to read, and figure out what is important to him and society.

Mr. Buettner deserves the title of the next Robert Heinlein. I will read anything he writes.
Some people can spin a yarn, but the best will knit recognizable objects and traditions into a story of the future. To begin, a teen loses his mother (and Indianapolis) to a huge asteroid. Turns out the Human race is under attack from space; just visualize 'nuclear winter'. He runs afoul of the law. Jason Wander (how appropriate) chooses Army Infantry over going to prison. Everything they wear and eat comes out of storage depots. Basic training is the proverbial 6-mile jog through hell, with blisters and ancient rifle. In other words, weapons inadequate to fight the coming war. Around them, electric cars, food crops, even jet travel are all overwhelmed. Mankind becomes one more endangered species.
Emergency programs apply commercial tech to the military problems. Buettner observes: "the sad truth is that war is to innovation as manure is to marigolds." The author has a background in Military Intelligence. He forsaw troop armor, HUD displays attached to helmets, and use of battlefield drones even prior to the Iraq war.
The story moves quickly and Jason has no time to form deep relationships. Only three really get inside his head. Jason participates in several important skirmishes. He suffers tragedy and it strengthens him. It is a great beginning to the series.
This book covers the recruit to leader journey of a young man in a war. Unlike _The Forever War_ but like _Starship Troopers_ the war involved is clearly, to any sane reader, a just war, with humankind under attack. These stories go farther back if you don't need the SF elements. Leon Uris _Battle Cry_ told a similar story about WWII.

The young man is no Juan Rico and the book was not intended to be sold to a publisher for its juvenile line, so the adult themes are right up front and handled well. Unlike Juan, and certainly unlike anything that happens in _The Forever War_ the youngster is involved early-on in a very important side trip, as it were. What he learns there and the contact he makes there have an impact all through the book.

The young man studies military history in his spare time as a grunt. Some of the action, and there is a lot of action, in the book is reminiscent of the Korean Conflict.

This is the first book in a series and the story-arc has already gone very far, some would say unbelievably far, but I will try the next one.
Any reader of Heinlien and the other great military Sci Fi authors will feel very comforitable just a few pages into Orphanage. It is obvious where the author drew inspiration from but he manages to do so without making the book seem like a shallow copy or clone. The book itself is well written and fair fast paced. It follows the traditional Sci Fi hero route of a trouble youth to a war hero all in 300 pages or less. One of the aspects I very much enjoyed was the use of old (at least to the characters) equipment and training styles. The technology in the book is not so outlandish that it seems completely foreign to a dweller of the current age. The book slows in places and some of the cliche are annoying but never show stopping. I found the very defeatest feelings in the bigging of the book to be a bit of a downer but the fact the book made me feel anything is a good showing of how good it is. All in all I was very happy with my spur of the moment buy and look forward to seeing where Jason Wander goes from here.
I had a couple of friends recommend this book so I looked it up online and read some of the reviews I found. Its frequent comparisons to Robert A. Heinlein's work almost scared me away. I am a long-time lover of Mr. Heinlein and many is the book that has tried to meet the level of the master and failed; I have been disappointed many, many times.

This book and the follow-up books in the series will not disappoint! Mr. Buettner does an excellent job of building the character of Jason Wander in a manner similar to Juan Rico in Starship Troopers but the characters diverge quickly in their focus. While Heinlein's work is a treatise on patriotism and duty, Buettner's novel describes the angst and pain that comes from performing that duty while those around you fall, and the harsh responsibility and loneliness of command. I would place the Orphanage series on the shelf alongside Starship Troopers and tell people to read them back to back if they really want to understand the mind of a soldier; they complement each other nicely. I'm already half-way thru the third book of the five book series and have been equally impressed with them but that is another review....
This was a good, light read...not quite "couldn't put it down", but once the action gets rolling in 2nd half of book, I was wrapped up in it. The first half had too many unlikely events happen to our protagonist, culminating with his trip to the moon and the events there. I found myself rather annoyed by incidents that left me thinking, "yeah right, whatever..."

But the author does weave in some good humor/wit, and develops a few characters well enough that I kept reading. For me, the book really came into its own on the voyage out to, and including, the final showdown. These sequences were well written, gritty and engrossing...enough so that I just bought the 2nd book. I would say much of the book rated a 3-star, but at the end I found I really liked it and hope the next one builds on this.