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Mount Dragon epub

by David Colacci,Douglas Preston


Mount Dragon epub

ISBN: 1561003115

ISBN13: 978-1561003112

Author: David Colacci,Douglas Preston

Category: Science Fiction

Subcategory: Science Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Unabridged Library Edition; Unabridged edition (March 1, 1996)

ePUB book: 1920 kb

FB2 book: 1493 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 587

Other Formats: doc mobi rtf mbr





Richard Preston, David Preston. Douglas Jerome Preston (born May 31, 1956) is an American journalist and author

Richard Preston, David Preston. Douglas Jerome Preston (born May 31, 1956) is an American journalist and author. Although he is best known for his thrillers in collaboration with Lincoln Child (including the Agent Pendergast series and Gideon Crew series), he has also written six solo novels, including the Wyman Ford series and a novel entitled Jennie, which was made into a movie by Disney. Additional novels by the Preston and Child team include Mount Dragon, Riptide, Thunderhead, and The Ice Limit. Later, the duo created the Gideon Crew series, which consists of Gideon's Sword, Gideon's Corpse, and The Lost Island.

Written by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child. The Third Gate: Jeremy Logan, Book 3. Lincoln Child. Narrated by David Colacci. Guy Carson is a brilliant scientist at GeneDyne, one of the world's foremost biochemical companies. When he is transferred to Mount Dragon, GeneDyne's high-security genetic engineering lab, his good fortune seems too good to be true. Crucible: A Thriller.

Mount Dragon (Mass Market Paperback). Published December 1st 2007 by Tor Books. Douglas Preston (Goodreads Author), Lincoln Child. David Colacci (Narrator). Mass Market Paperback, 492 pages. ISBN: 1423356136 (ISBN13: 9781423356134).

Douglas Preston's solo novels include the New York Times bestsellers Impact, Blasphemy, The Codex, and Tyrannosaur Canyon. His nonfiction book The Monster of Florence is being made into a film starring George Clooney

Douglas Preston's solo novels include the New York Times bestsellers Impact, Blasphemy, The Codex, and Tyrannosaur Canyon. His nonfiction book The Monster of Florence is being made into a film starring George Clooney. Preston is an expert long-distance horseman, a member of the elite Long Riders Guild, and a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society.

Narrated by David Colacci. Guy Carson is a brilliant scientist at GeneDyne, one of the world's foremost biochemical companies

Narrated by David Colacci. When he is transferred to Mount D.

товар 1 "Mount Dragon by Preston, Douglas J. " -"Mount Dragon by Preston, Douglas . I bought this hardbacked, jacketed copy to complete my set of the first six Prestonn and Child books which I consider the best. " -"Mount Dragon by Preston, Douglas J. "288,00 RUB. + 620,07 RUB за доставку.

When he is transferred to Mount Dragon, GeneDyne's high-security genetic engineering lab, his good fortune seems . David Colacci narrates a number of Child/Preston books, so I've stayed clear of those. A shame as I enjoy these writers immensely.

When he is transferred to Mount Dragon, GeneDyne's high-security genetic engineering lab, his good fortune seems too good to be true.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Douglas J Preston books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles.

Guy Carson and Susana Cabeza de Vaca have come to Mount Dragon to work shoulder to shoulder with some of the greatest scientific minds on the planet.

Guy Carson is a brilliant scientist at GeneDyne, one of the world's foremost biochemical companies. When he is transferred to Mount Dragon, GeneDyne's high-security genetic engineering lab, his good fortune seems too good to be true. Carson soon finds that it is. He learns that GeneDyne geneticists are tinkering with a common virus with an eye on the enormous profit to be had from a cure for the flu. Their cure involves permanently altering DNA in humans, and Carson's job is to stabilize the virus. But Carson starts to wonder if this is justifiable, even for the most noble medical cause. Altering genes is a risky job, and the possibility of creating another killer virus is very real. What's more, Mount Dragon harbors another secret that puts the world at horrifying risk.
I've been playing catch-up on the older books by these authors, and have just finished Mount Dragon. I don't know enough about genetic research to question the techniques used here, but it was fascinating reading, even if not feasible. I did find just about all of the characters, with the exception of the OSHA investigator, to be morally challenged to lesser or greater degrees. Brent Scopes is especially troublesome, veering with startling suddenness from the kindest of acts to the most cruel. Maybe he is the prime example of the underlying qualities of good and evil in all humans, but I found his abrupt switch to his better angel when he learned he was dying to be self-serving and unconvincing. I have found that the older books by this duo are more carefully written overall than their later efforts. This I would recommend just for the ride.
Preston and Child's MOUNT DRAGON suffers from clichéd characters, too many side plots, and a failure to ever actually deal with the ethical issue on which the novel was supposedly based. The story focuses on a young geneticist, Guy Carson, who is recruited by GeneDyne, a medical research company, to help develop a cure for the flu through genetic engineering. The controversial issue here is whether scientists should ever consider altering the human genome, even if such alterations could potentially make all future generations immune to the flu virus. Is this "tampering with God's work," or is it a new form of human-engineered evolution? Preston & Child present both sides of the argument through two competing scientists, Brent Scopes (president of GeneDyne) and his former partner, Charles Levine - Scopes is a megalomaniac who will do anything for money, and Levine is the do-gooder Holocaust survivor who believes that tampering with human DNA is unconscionable.

I like the premise here, but unfortunately Preston and Child never go any deeper than the surface in exploring the controversy. Instead, the novel reads like yet another anti-science horror story where super viruses threaten the human race and greed and stupidity lead to the ultimate failure of any so-called scientific advancement. On top of the flu storyline, there's another involving the development of a genetically engineered artificial blood (which is set to be released in a few months) - this takes the novel in a completely different direction, so that the original story gets virtually forgotten. Then there's a hunt for hidden treasure in the desert, which made me think Preston and Child couldn't remember which book they were working on here.

On top of that, the characters in MOUNT DRAGON are a frustrating collection of clichés and stereotypes which are neither interesting nor original on any level. Protagonist Guy is a geneticist in cowboy hat and boots - his dialogue is a combination of prairie jargon and colloquialisms. His assistant is a gorgeous Mexican woman with a huge chip on her shoulder and hot Spanish blood (she calls him "cabron" and hisses at him like a snake, but you know they're going to end up with each other by the end). There's a fat bitchy woman who gives Guy grief and pays a big price for it (nothing new there!), an ex-military hard-case with a fast horse and big gun, a wheelchair-bound computer genius with a grudge to settle, and a bevy of other caricatures to fill out the plot. Never once do any of these people seem real. Never once did I find myself caught up in their story.

To make matters worse, the computer stuff in this novel is absolutely ridiculous. The book came out in 1997, which was admittedly a very different world technologically speaking, but even so the computer scenes seem incredibly sketchy. For example, there are long chat-dialogues between Levine and the computer geek where they are typing to each other over the Internet, but it never reads like messaging or chatting at all. They type massive paragraphs of information to each other, in full sentences, with full capitalization and punctuation. It was impossible to imagine these two men doing this. It was just silly. And there's a convoluted virtual reality segment at the end that is almost impossible to follow (and makes almost no sense at all).

I have been fans of these writers for a very long time. I loved RELIC (as well as many of their subsequent novels), but MOUNT DRAGON was a disappointment. It's not a bad beach read, and the story moves along fairly quickly, but don't expect to get attached to any of these characters and don't expect to care all that much about what happens to them. This is the kind of thing you'll read and forget the minute you've turned the final page.
Let me say that for me to give a five star review is practically impossible. I do sincerely save that for the absolute pinnacle. But that doesn't mean that I don't really like ALL of Preston and Child's work. So, in short, a 4-star is my top rating in most circumstances. I have bought many of their books and have enjoyed them all; meaning I will continue to do so. I highly recommend all their work. You'll be entertained. Promise! Daniel Lance Wright, Author. Annie's World 2: New Beginnings
This is one of the early novels written by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child. It's about a nuclear reactor situation out in the southwestern area of the United States (desert), and how this one person handles it. I read this years ago, and in rereading it, it had all the excitement the second time around! This was a great fine. It is a first edition, but hasn't been available for several years. It is in great shape, and you should grab one whenever you find it. It's a rare find!
Enjoyed the hunt and chase in the desert, the technical work on the deadly viruses and the main characters.

The chief villain was hard to decipher, both selfish and generous.

Only thing I did not like was all the comments on the nasty woman who was overweight. Somehow, her being fat should not be factored in to her obnoxious personality.

I especially liked the desert scenes and reading about the survival techniques used by the protagonists to get through it.
Given that this book was written in 1996, one might think it a little dated in 2015.....they would be wrong. In every way it is contemporary: it is current today. The authors weave a complex story, highly technical, easily fitting into today's scientific activities. I marveled at their grasp of terms, their comprehension of today's science, yet the story is clear, fast-paced, easily understood as they describe events on the edge of belief. Anyone who likes science fiction will read this novel with great pleasure, well within the boundaries of possibility. The characters are sharply etched even in their grotesqueness. The resolution is reasonable and satisfying. 5 stars for a compelling story and great imagination!