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Gumshoe Gorilla epub

by Eric Dunn,Keith Hartman


Gumshoe Gorilla epub

ISBN: 1449919332

ISBN13: 978-1449919337

Author: Eric Dunn,Keith Hartman

Category: Science Fiction

Subcategory: Science Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (December 8, 2009)

Pages: 344 pages

ePUB book: 1822 kb

FB2 book: 1347 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 458

Other Formats: rtf lrf mbr lrf





This book is the second in Keith Hartman's Gumshoe Gorilla series (if there is indeed a series continuing after two books; one hopes so. oth books are delightfully plotted, with complex but engaging story lines, interesting.

This book is the second in Keith Hartman's Gumshoe Gorilla series (if there is indeed a series continuing after two books; one hopes so. oth books are delightfully plotted, with complex but engaging story lines, interesting characters, thoughtfully appropriate dialogue and just enough craziness to keep the whole thing bouncing along. If not, this is the sequel to that novel. Go back and read that one first! :) If you enjoy Hartman's wacky, deliberately off-kilter style, nothing I say will stop you from reading this book. And I certainly wouldn't want to. It was more fun than being hit on the head by a fictional cartoon gorilla.

Gumshoe Gorilla" is much less of a madcap action movie than Hartman's first book, and more of a game of "Clue. There is a smaller cast of familiar characters from the first book, all of whom were active or at least mentioned via Hartman's multiple point-of-view technique. I think Hartman handles the multiple perspective well and never found it confusing ) What I liked best about "Gumshoe Gorilla" was the sharper focus on Drew Parker, the ga. .

You can read book Gumshoe Gorilla by Hartman, Keith in our library for absolutely free. Authors: Hartman, Keith, Dunn, Eric.

Read Gumshoe Gorilla Online. Authors: Keith Hartman,Eric Dunn. This is an amazing book. Gumshoe Gorilla by Keith Hartman. First Published in the United States by Meisha Merlin in 2002. "Set in 2025 Atlanta, this sequel to Hartman's first novel, The Gumshoe, the Witch, and the Virtual Corpse (2001), features gay detective Drew Parker, his Wiccan partner Jennifer Grey and a large supporting cast of strange people. Like its predecessor, it employs the same irresistible zaniness and wit, multiple viewpoints, high sexual content (both gay and straight) and cheerfully chaotic narrative technique.

Keith Hartman (born 1966) is an American writer of speculative fiction and a self-described "struggling film-maker". He has also written non-fiction books on gay and lesbian issues. He has been nominated a number of times for the Gaylactic Spectrum Awards and Lambda Literary Award for LGBT literature. Hartman was born in Huntsville, Alabama. He graduated from Princeton University, then went on to study at the London School of Economics, then started a PhD in Finance at Duke University.

2024 was a rough year for Drew Parker. com User, 9 years ago. I thoroughly enjoyed the first book in this series and equally enjoyed this sequel. The storytelling is the same high level.

Vampire Strippers Must Die. Entertainment Focus. PagesPublic figureAuthorKeith Hartman's Books and Movies. English (UK) · Русский · Українська · Suomi · Español.

First Published in the United States by Meisha Merlin in 2002. Cover art and interior illustrations by Eric Dunn.

Keith Hartman is an American writer of speculative fiction and a.He has also written non-fiction books on gay and lesbian issues

Keith Hartman is an American writer of speculative fiction and a self-described "struggling film-maker".

The exciting sequel to THE GUMSHOE, THE WITCH, AND THE VIRTUAL CORPSE! 2034 was a rough year for Drew Parker. His car broke down, his rent went up, and his partner was kidnapped by a revenge-crazed performance artist. And to top it off, one of Drew's clients was tossed from a skyscraper- after being stripped naked, smeared in human fat, and painted with occult symbols. So far, 2035 isn't shaping up to be much better. What started off as a simple case involving a deaf girl and her cheating boyfriend is getting complicated. It doesn't help that the boyfriend is one of five identical actors cloned from the frozen corpse of a dead movie star. Or that he's up to his neck in a convoluted blackmail plot. Or that the guy is being stalked by some sort of secret agent, a dame in a clown mask with the combat skills of a Navy Seal. And besides, Drew has his own problem to deal with. A personal matter involving a male prostitute, a privatized version of the KGB, and a vampire sex cult. Well at least his Wiccan partner, Jen, is back to help him out. If he can just get her to cut back on the practical jokes. ... and the dating advice.
"Gumshoe Gorilla" is much less of a madcap action movie than Hartman's first book, and more of a game of "Clue." There is a smaller cast of familiar characters from the first book, all of whom were active or at least mentioned via Hartman's multiple point-of-view technique. I think Hartman handles the multiple perspective well and never found it confusing. (Something about these books makes me think of Kurt Vonnegut, although I can't quite put my finger on it...)

What I liked best about "Gumshoe Gorilla" was the sharper focus on Drew Parker, the gay gumshoe (private eye), which gives him centrality in all of the book's various plot-lines. I like Parker, and his character gave the book a strong gay presence, some thing the author might have been trying to avoid in the first book (for marketing reasons), where Parker is somewhat lost in a larger, more confusing cast.

Hartman doesn't give us in-depth character analysis, but he sketches out each of the key players well enough that we understand their emotions and their motives. A few stray threads - like the "Number Cruncher," appear and then go mostly nowhere (except to introduce another character who becomes nothing more than a crucial detail in the plot). This, I confess, is irritating, but perhaps it is also setting up the plot for the next book. (And I do hope there is a next book.)

I give reluctant credit to Hartman for not being a romantic. I am a romantic and I want everything to go that way...but the gentle, surprisingly poignant ending, made me realize how much more developed Drew Parker is than I'd thought he was. At the end of this book we realize we know this man better than any of the other characters. And we admire him, his generous spirit, and a loving soul that he himself doesn't realize he has. Surely, I hope, we'll get more of Drew Parker in the future.

I can't downgrade a review for editorial failings...yes, there are grammatical errors and typographical glitches that are annoying all the way through this...but I always resented teachers who lowered your grade for spelling or grammar and didn't credit your writing. It's about creativity, folks. Keith Hartman is a very creative writer. We must encourage him.
This book is the second in Keith Hartman's Gumshoe Gorilla series (if there is indeed a series continuing after two books; one hopes so).Both books are delightfully plotted, with complex but engaging story lines, interesting characters, thoughtfully appropriate dialogue and just enough craziness to keep the whole thing bouncing along.

There is one problem: Mr Hartman seems to hate the word 'of' when it rightfully pops up after the word 'couple', as in 'a couple of people' or 'a couple of reasons.' In every instance where such a construct appears, and there are dozens of them, he rips the word 'of' out of its middle position and casts it carelessly to the floor. For all I know, he may run it through a wood chipper to guarantee its demise, a paper shredder not being sufficient. There was only one time, in book two (the book to which this review is attached), where he left the—to him—offensive word in its rightful place. I will not mention the location of this anomaly lest he race there, delete the word, and order a reprint of all extant copies of the tome.

I know the source of this problem, as will anyone reading this review if s/he contemplates the laziness in diction that has become very nearly de rigeur for the younger generations. Hopefully this author will correct this issue in his next Gumshoe Gorilla mystery.

But, to be fair, with as much fun as I had addressing this issue, it is really only a pimple on the face of this otherwise beautiful book. There are, of course, a handful of typos that could easily by repaired; but one finds these in most books not written by JK Rowling.

This book is rollicking good fun, as is its predecessor, and I recommend them both to anyone looking more for enjoyment from their reading than for life lessons and deep thoughts.
If you've read "The Witch, the Gumshoe, and the Virtual Corpse", you already know what to expect from this off-beat and clever writer.
If not, this is the sequel to that novel. Go back and read that one first! :)
If you enjoy Hartman's wacky, deliberately off-kilter style, nothing I say will stop you from reading this book. And I certainly wouldn't want to. It was more fun than being hit on the head by a fictional cartoon gorilla. Which happened. Maybe. The reader can never be altogether sure. So start reading it already! :)