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Star Trek Log Four epub

by Alan Dean Foster


Star Trek Log Four epub

ISBN: 0345275535

ISBN13: 978-0345275530

Author: Alan Dean Foster

Category: Science Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Del Rey (December 12, 1977)

ePUB book: 1352 kb

FB2 book: 1434 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 936

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Fan mail for alan dean foster: "Your Star Trek Log One was a real thrill! I enjoyed reading your stories almost as much as I. .

Fan mail for alan dean foster: "Your Star Trek Log One was a real thrill! I enjoyed reading your stories almost as much as I enjoyed watching the actual animated adventures. I am anxiously awaiting Log Tw. "Star Trek Log One was really a tremendous book. from the first page I was hooked. one of the best books I have ever read. thank yo. "Bravo! Magnificent! Fascinating! The Star Trek Logs are an addition to the world of Star Trek that deserve galaxy-wide praise!" "Live long and prosper!" Also by alan dean foster.

Star Trek Log is a series of ten novelizations based on, and inspired by, episodes of the science fiction television series Star Trek: The Animated Series. The series is similar to novelizations based on episodes of Star Trek: The Original Series published by Bantam Books, and written by James Blish and J. A. Lawrence.

The Star Trek Logs are a series of short story collections written by Alan Dean Foster

The Star Trek Logs are a series of short story collections written by Alan Dean Foster  . The Star Trek Logs are a series of short story collections written by Alan Dean Foster. The stories are adaptations of various Star Trek: The Animated Series episodes. They were published by Ballantine Books, from 1974 to 1978. The original release consists of 10 Logs, though there were different compilations published later by Del Rey and Pocke. ore. Book 1. Star Trek Log One. by Alan Dean Foster. The first in a series of Star Trek: The Animated.

Star Trek: Log Four (1975) contains three adaptations by Alan Dean Foster based on episodes of Star Trek: The Animated Series: "The Terratin Incident," "Time Trap," and "More Tribbles, More Troubles. Here, the Enterprise crew shrinks to Lilliputian dimensions, gets caught in a time warp, and re-encounters Cyrano Jones and his collection of tribbles

In February 1975 was published Alan Dean Foster's fourth book of Star Trek: The Animated Series novelizations. Bestselling science fiction writer Alan Dean Foster was born in New York City in 1946, but raised mainly in California.

In February 1975 was published Alan Dean Foster's fourth book of Star Trek: The Animated Series novelizations. in Political Science from UCLA in 1968, and a . Foster enjoys traveling because it gives him opportunities to meet new people and explore new places and cultures. This interest is carried over to his writing, but with a twist: the new places encountered in his books are likely to be on another planet, and the people may belong to an alien race.

Star Trek: Logs Three and Four (Star Trek: Log, As a big Star Trek fan I love all the books. Including this one. I hope to see Alan Dean Foster write more Star Trek books. I really enjoyed this book because of the characters, the setting, and the plot. I would recommend it for all Trekkers or anybody who loves a good book. Live long and prosper alan dean foster.

Alan Dean Foster (born 18 November 1946; age 72) is a prolific science fiction and fantasy author

Alan Dean Foster (born 18 November 1946; age 72) is a prolific science fiction and fantasy author. Born in New York City, Foster went to the University of California, Los Angeles. As a novelist, Foster wrote Ballantine Books' line of Star Trek: The Animated Series novelizations, titled the Star Trek Logs, and a new, serialized essay on the writing of those Logs, which was included with the five 2006 trade paperback reprint omnibuses. He also wrote a number of the Star Trek stories released by Peter Pan Records. In 2009, Foster wrote the novelization for .

Star Trek - - Star Trek Log Five. entertaining and intelligent. This book is pure class all the wa.The final page is a great climax. The Republic is decaying, even under the leadership of Supreme Chancellor Palpatine, who was elected to save the galaxy from collapsing under the forces of discontent. On the tiny but strategic planet of Ansion, a powerful faction is on the verge of joining the growing secessionist movement.

Star trek : log four. Foster, Alan Dean, 1946-. New York : Ballantine Books. Star trek-the animated series (Television program). inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana.

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Star Trek: Log Four (1975) contains three TV-script-to-novella adaptations by Alan Dean Foster based on episodes of Star Trek: The Animated Series: "The Terratin Incident," "Time Trap," and "More Tribbles, More Troubles." Here, the Enterprise crew shrinks to Lilliputian dimensions, gets caught in a time warp, and re-encounters Cyrano Jones and his collection of tribbles.

Adapting a 23-minute teleplay to a seventy-page story is no small challenge, and Foster generally does a fair job, giving the stories a more leisurely pace that allows him to build some cosmic atmosphere and bring some depth to the ship and crew. When it doesn't go well, however, things degenerate to a nigh-unreadable slog.

That's the case here with "The Terratin Incident," which is easily the silliest of the three stories here, but which is inexplicably dragged out over half the book. Foster really drops the ball with the logic of his explanations for the phenomenon: if the crew shrinks but retains their original weight, they must also retain their original strength - otherwise they wouldn't be able to move; they should be little super ant people. Instead, they're straining at knobs and building tiny ladders. Also terrible is Foster's embarrassing failure at shamelessly contriving some suspense at the end.

The other two stories are quite a bit better, however. They're also significantly shorter and much better paced. "More Tribbles, More Troubles" is the best, and it's the shortest. One can't help but think that given the fixed length of these volumes, four episodes would be a better number for each than three.

Foster's dialogue, a problem throughout this series, again doesn't ring true for a number of characters in many places. And there are a number of other things that Foster inserts that don't fit with the Star Trek world we know (or even the one we knew in 1975), including a wife for Scotty and Federation mind-wiping.

In short, the other two stories are pretty solid, but "The Terratin Incident" just kills Log Four.
Star Trek: Log Four (1975) contains three TV-script-to-novella adaptations by Alan Dean Foster based on episodes of Star Trek: The Animated Series: "The Terratin Incident," "Time Trap," and "More Tribbles, More Troubles." Here, the Enterprise crew shrinks to Lilliputian dimensions, gets caught in a time warp, and re-encounters Cyrano Jones and his collection of tribbles.

Adapting a 23-minute teleplay to a seventy-page story is no small challenge, and Foster generally does a fair job, giving the stories a more leisurely pace that allows him to build some cosmic atmosphere and bring some depth to the ship and crew. When it doesn't go well, however, things degenerate to a nigh-unreadable slog.

That's the case here with "The Terratin Incident," which is easily the silliest of the three stories here, but which is inexplicably dragged out over half the book. Foster really drops the ball with the logic of his explanations for the phenomenon: if the crew shrinks but retains their original weight, they must also retain their original strength - otherwise they wouldn't be able to move; they should be little super ant people. Instead, they're straining at knobs and building tiny ladders. Also terrible is Foster's embarrassing failure at shamelessly contriving some suspense at the end.

The other two stories are quite a bit better, however. They're also significantly shorter and much better paced. "More Tribbles, More Troubles" is the best, and it's the shortest. One can't help but think that given the fixed length of these volumes, four episodes would be a better number for each than three.

Foster's dialogue, a problem throughout this series, again doesn't ring true for a number of characters in many places. And there are a number of other things that Foster inserts that don't fit with the Star Trek world we know (or even the one we knew in 1975), including a wife for Scotty and Federation mind-wiping.

In short, the other two stories are pretty solid, but "The Terratin Incident" just kills Log Four.
Star Trek: Log Three (1975) contains three more TV-script-to-novella adaptations by Alan Dean Foster based on episodes of Star Trek: The Animated Series: "Once Upon a Planet," "Mudd's Passion," and "The Magicks of Megas Tu." Here, the Enterprise returns to the Amusement Planet from the TOS episode "Shore Leave," encounters Harry Mudd for the third time, and travels to a magical planet at the center of the galaxy.

This is easily the weakest entry to this point in the series. For one, Foster is not at his best here. Foster's treatment of the material lacks energy, and the pacing is sluggish. Throughout the series, Foster jumps abruptly from one character's head to the next, and it's worse here than ever, to a jarring degree. Unlike the previous Log books, this one is riddled with errors, including an egregious number of cases of "it's" where it should be "its."

Granted, these stories are based on cartoons, but the second and third entries feel especially cartoony, which is a problem Foster was largely able to avoid in the previous volumes. Not that this is completely his fault; the source material is frequently silly: dinosaurs, love potions, magic, a friendly Lucifer. And "The Magicks of Megas Tu" features much in common with the worst parts of the plot of Star Trek V: The Final Frontier. Why they went to that well twice, I can't imagine.

Star Trek: Log Three gives you three mediocre adaptations of forgettable episodes. You can do better.