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The Ordinary epub

by Jim Grimsley


The Ordinary epub

ISBN: 0765305283

ISBN13: 978-0765305282

Author: Jim Grimsley

Category: Science Fiction

Subcategory: Fantasy

Language: English

Publisher: Tor Books; Stated First Edition edition (May 1, 2004)

Pages: 368 pages

ePUB book: 1912 kb

FB2 book: 1168 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 615

Other Formats: lrf lit docx mbr





Home Jim Grimsley The Ordinary. The author and publisher have provided this e-book to you without Digital Rights Management software (DRM) applied so that you can enjoy reading it on your personal devices. This e-book is for your personal use only.

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Jim Grimsley's novels and short stories have been favorably compared to the works of Samuel R. Delany, Jack Vance.

Jim Grimsley's novels and short stories have been favorably compared to the works of Samuel R. Delany, Jack Vance, and Ursula K. Le Guin. Now he unleashes an ambitious and audacious collision between science and magic. On one side of the portal is Senal, an advanced technological civilization of some thirty billion Jim Grimsley's novels and short stories have been favorably compared to the works of Samuel R.

Jim Grimsley ft it, including the useless stat. Goodness, she said, in Alenke. She repeated the words in Erejhen, and Arvith nodded, busy with some last repacking of the smaller trunk. You’re going with the first group, he said. You’ll have Kethen for company. We’re going in groups?. There are too many for one big caravan. Herself prefers to travel alone

Jim Grimsley's novels and short stories have been favorably compared to the works of Samuel R. On the other side is Irion, a land of myth and legend, where the world is flat and mighty wizards once ruled.

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Jim Grimsley's novels and short stories have been favorably compared to the works of Samuel R. Delany, Jack Vance, and Ursula K. Le Guin. Now he unleashes an ambitious and audacious collision between science and magic.The Twil Gate links two very different realms. On one side of the portal is Senal, an advanced technological civilization of some thirty billion inhabitants, all cybernetically linked and at war with machine intelligences many light-years away. On the other side is Irion, a land of myth and legend, where the world is flat and mighty wizards once ruled.Jedda Martele is a linguist and trader from Senal. Although fascinated by the languages and cultures of Irion, she shares her people's assumption that Irion is backward and superstitious and no match for her homeland's superior numbers and technology. But as the two realms march inevitably toward war, Jedda finds herself at the center of historic, unimaginable events that will challenge everything she has ever believed about the world---and herself.The Ordinary is a powerful and entrancing tale of magic, science, and the mysterious truth that binds them together.
This book is a follow up Kirith Kirin. However it is not as interesting or complex as Kirith Kirin (one of my favorite books). This book ends about when you expect it to get going. Still its as good as the endless books others crank out and as most grimsley books, is very well written. The book "the last green tree" may be the follow up to this. It has some of the same characters and is set some years after this book ends.

Why Grimsley's books are out of print is a mystery to me. I had to get this one and the last green tree used. You cant even find Kirith Kirin used except at extremely high used book prices. A shame since Kirith Kirin is one of the better stories I have read and if I could find it in print, would make a fantastic gift to other readers.. At least some of these books are on Kindel
I love everything Jim Grimsley has written and this is no exception.

It does not approach the complexity and feeling that I received from reading his Kirith Kirin and like that book, I did not want The Ordinary to end. It did however--and much too quickly--as if the publisher was on his back to meet a deadline.

The story is complex and perhaps too filled with invented words, but I soon learned to read over and around them like a stream trickling over stones--and to enjoy the ride--slipping and sliding like an otter.

Grimsley never disappoints, but Kirtith Kirin is his opus to beat.
Just a note to anyone who picks this up, read "Kirith Kairin" first. It's an arduous read, but well worth it.
This novel is brilliant and quickly infectious. It feels very new and different from any other fantasy novel. The mix of scifi and fantasy is well done and seamless.

A must for sure.
I had previously read Kirith Kirin, so this novel made sense and was a welcome return to an interesting world. Overall the concept of the intersections of worlds of magic and science, and the philosophical and theological ramifications is a very interesting one. Plus I now understand what all those appendixes in Kirith Kirin were about.

However, the novel does rush to a sudden end, which wasn't good after so much build-up in the body. I hope Grimsley plans to write more.
Very good follow up to Kirith Kirin, however, it ends too abruptly and needs a bit more detail to come to fruition.
As advertised. Thank you.
Engaging except for the end, which felt fast paced.
This is one of my favorite books; one I come back to and reread occasionally. Its structure is a bit odd as most of the book is written from the point of view of Jedda and then the last section switches temporarily to Malin's. The book also keeps a rather slow and methodical pace but I love how a love story is integrated into the greater story of an encounter between two civilizations and the greater theme of technology, cultural arrogance and our place in the universe. The violence and even the sex is presented in such a dispassionate way that I understood what was happening without getting overwhelmed emotionally. Someone else might find that a negative but in this Game of Thrones era, I found it oddly refreshing.