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Inhuman Resources (Osi) epub

by Jes Battis


Inhuman Resources (Osi) epub

ISBN: 044101884X

ISBN13: 978-0441018840

Author: Jes Battis

Category: Science Fiction

Subcategory: Fantasy

Language: English

Publisher: Ace (May 25, 2010)

ePUB book: 1879 kb

FB2 book: 1385 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 918

Other Formats: azw lit mbr mobi





This part is ridiculous and if Jes thinks that teenage kids are reading these books then he is wrong, unless they are his students, then maybe.

Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). This part is ridiculous and if Jes thinks that teenage kids are reading these books then he is wrong, unless they are his students, then maybe. I'm a parent and teens minds are not mature enough for these escapades. Patrick may be the future exception, since he is assimulating all the magnate's memories.

2010) (The third book in the OSI series) A novel by Jes Battis. When a powerful necromancer is killed, Occult Special Investigator Tess Corday must handle the heavy politics in the occult community as carefully as she handles the scant evidence. Genre: Urban Fantasy. Similar books by other authors.

The berkley publishing group. A van for on-site forensic testing was parked in the entrance. Two houses down, an OSI tech was checking the integrity of the first perimeter veil. Published by the Penguin Group. She passed an alternative light source over a patch of dark air, and colors danced within the arc. The veil was working.

Completed Inhuman Resources (Occult Special Investigations, Book 3) by Jes Battis. Best book yet in Battis’ OSI series. Included a visit to Trinovantum, the hidden extradimensional city of the Necromancers. Extraordinarily imaginative

Completed Inhuman Resources (Occult Special Investigations, Book 3) by Jes Battis. Extraordinarily imaginative. My only regret with this series is that we have to wait a year between volumes. Oct 06, 2016 Amber rated it liked it. Shelves: read-in-2016.

Jes Battis, Bailey Cunningham - Author. the author site of Bailey Cunningham/Jes Battis. Bailey Cunningham and Jes Battis were born five minutes apart on May 21, 1979. Battis writes in the genre of urban fantasy, while Cunningham prefers epic fantasy and historical fiction. Battis teaches in the areas of queer theory, children’s literature, and creative writing.

Inhuman Resources (OSI). Inhuman Resources (OSI). Published 2010 by Ace. Tess Corday (Fictitious character), Magicians, Murder, Fiction.

OSI series - Jes Battis. Urban Fantasy, Suspense Thriller, Police Procedural. Tess Corday, Occult Special Investigator for Vancouver’s Mystical Crime Lab, is used to seeing dead vampires. But there’s nothing ordinary about this case. Not the lab results on the cause of death. Not the teenage girl living at the address found in the vamp’s pocket, who may well be in thrall to a demon. And certainly not Lucian Agrado, the necromancer who is liaison to the vampire community

Battis Jes. Categories: Fiction. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

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When a powerful necromancer is killed, Occult Special Investigator Tess Corday must handle the heavy politics in the occult community as carefully as she handles the scant evidence.

When a powerful necromancer is killed, Occult Special Investigator Tess Corday must handle the heavy politics in the occult community as carefully as she handles the scant evidence. But with her sometime lover Lucian Agrado representing the necromancers in the grisly matter, things are about to get out of control...fast.
My top 13 resons for reading this book:
1. Great description of the hidden city that necromancers hang out in.
2. Lucian is still my fav character and we got to learn some of his secrets. Way cool.
3. Tess is becoming a dynamic character... in other words, she is learning the that world doesn't revolve around her.
4. A villain from three books ago finally dies for good (or so it appears). Time to move on to other story lines.
5. Manticores are cool and underused. Hope we meet up with another (even if it is another series)soon.
6. The Alchemist storyline was awesome.
7. Loved getting to know Patrick better and his story. Glad that Mia didn't take up much space in this one.
8. Secondary characters do not live to serve Tess... they have their own lives to lead. (Except maybe Selena, but she reminds Tess that she doesn't live for Tess several times, so it doesn't count.)
9. Loved the fact that an artwork was a pivotal artifact to the story. I'm an art teacher so that rubbed me the right way.
10. The demon father tease at the end has me really gunning for the next in the series.
11. If you love urban fantasy mysteries with lots of cool lingo and adventure/action/humor then you should give this series a try.
12. I love all the cultural references, I can relate as an almost 40 year old.
13. As usual, the cultural sensitivity is there, which is great with me, but it doesn't have to be culturally sensitive all the time.

Top 4 reasons criticisms for this book:
1. You should read the first 2 before reading this one. I did have to go back and reread the first 2 again because I knew after reading the first couple of chapters that I forgot some of the history and characters since the last time I read them. Jes does give some review, but it is as needed and sometimes it was in the middle of the book.
2. There were one or two illogical things that ocurred in the book. Like everyone was drinking coffee, but they couldn't get a fingerprint match from a character's cup because they didn't think of it??? Seems like Mystery Writer's 101 to me. Also, where was Lucian when everything was going down at the end. Yeah, I know he is mysterious and all, but when it was hitting the fan and she could have died, he needed to be there. On the other hand, I appreciated the fact that she and her Scooby friends were able to handle things on their own. Maybe he didn't want to be involved with killing another of his kind - might cause an national crisis, I don't know. He could have told her if that was the case in the last chapter.
3. Ok, this is a reocurring theme in the books: Mia and Patrick are kids, no matter the V-virus status. Never would they be involved in battling huge nearly immortal baddies or be allowed free reign of a multi-million dollar facility. This part is ridiculous and if Jes thinks that teenage kids are reading these books then he is wrong, unless they are his students, then maybe. I'm a parent and teens minds are not mature enough for these escapades. Patrick may be the future exception, since he is assimulating all the magnate's memories. Vampire Bingo is about right for them, I think, though.
4. Ok. Not everyone is taking Spanish classes - enough said on that subject.

Overall - I loved this book and it ranks right up their many of my favorite "BIG" urban fantasy authors. They are better than the Rardin and L. Robertson series, I feel, but maybe not quite at the Harrison level, but working his way up to it. Tess needs to grow a little more and act a little more like a girl (and I'm not talking about being able to name designer clothes labels or Jimmy Choo shoes). No, I'm talking about when Lucian told her something emotionally important, that she needed to think and speak a little more like a girl would act and not how a guy would think. In a climate of woman authors dominating the urban fantasy market, I believe that Jes adding a lot to the genre. Well done. Now when is book 4 coming out?
I really like this series! Some of the cultural references are lost on me (age group & geographical), but otherwise a fun read.
This book was a bit more procedural-based than action-based compared to the previous two books in the series: I do love the C.S.I. (OSI) evidence and explanations, but I ultimately prefer my urban fantasy to resolve itself through choice and action. The first 2/3 of the book was great, but when Tess goes into a different realm (Lucien's home base) for help and information, there is suddenly several chapters of high fantasy world building. And the world is beautiful. The problem is that nothing really happens. Tess and Lucien get some information and then leave. I really needed them to get into some trouble and fight their way in or out. Instead, it felt like chapters of descriptive scenery. The ending also felt too convenient. Finally, instead of letting Mia and Patrick contribute to the fight as they did in the last book, they ended up just helpless victims. It was much more fun when all the characters were engaged. Still a good book and it doesn't dissuade me from continuing with the series.
Lots of action. Fun characters. Interesting world. As soon as I finished this volume I picked up Infernal Affairs (OSI) and started reading it. What higher praise is needed than that? One of the other reviewers mentioned some criticisms and they were all legitimate but I really didn't find them terribly distracting from my enjoyment of the book. The one thing that nags at the back of my mind is the question of how the human race, surrounded by these much older and more powerful civilizations, has avoided being assimilated or overrun by them. Who knows? Maybe it has an even more powerful patron who has kept it somewhat isolated for personal or culinary reasons. More than likely, the author just decided to work around the issue.

I did feel that Jes Battis filled in the back history enough that I'm not sure that I'm going to go back and read the first few books in the series but I might.

Enjoy!
We dig deep into Necromancer culture here, which is fascinating. The relationship between Tess and her illicit boyfriend continues to grow and it seems like it's not that hidden, which bothers me. They're in this supposedly forbidden relationship, but nobody bats an eye when they show up together, which seems to be to rob the series of some potentially excellent dramatic tension.
I have really enjoyed the entire OSI series with two exceptions. I would prefer less strange sex (just my personal preference and no real reflection on the author) AND I wish someone would tell Battis "anyway" is already plural and requires no "s" on the end. This is the first time I've run across an author who used "anyways" and I wince very time I see it. I *hear* it a lot, which makes me wince, but that's not nearly as bad as seeing it in print. That Battis is a professor and a teacher makes this close to a hanging offense. If Battis had consulted the dictionary more and used big technical words less, the series would deserve a much higher review than I'm giving it.