» » When We're in Public, Pretend You Don't Know Me: Surviving Your Daughter's Adolescence So You Don't Look Like an Idiot and She Still Talks to You

When We're in Public, Pretend You Don't Know Me: Surviving Your Daughter's Adolescence So You Don't Look Like an Idiot and She Still Talks to You epub

by Susan Borowitz


When We're in Public, Pretend You Don't Know Me: Surviving Your Daughter's Adolescence So You Don't Look Like an Idiot and She Still Talks to You epub

ISBN: 0446679518

ISBN13: 978-0446679510

Author: Susan Borowitz

Category: Relationships

Subcategory: Family Relationships

Language: English

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing; First Edition edition (April 1, 2003)

Pages: 288 pages

ePUB book: 1629 kb

FB2 book: 1264 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 390

Other Formats: lrf azw mobi mbr





When We're in Public, Pr. .has been added to your Cart. teens can and do abstain. I know quite a few of them

When We're in Public, Pr. I have a 13 year old daughter, and this book really resonated with me. I was pleasantly surprised to find that I already fit in the "Uncool Mom" category, but I still learned a lot from the common sense tips. I know quite a few of them. people in the media saying that kids cant abstain so teaching abstinance leads to a downward spiral: who wants to try and do the impossible. this aside though, this is an excellent book.

Teenage girls, Mothers and daughters, Adolescence. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Andy Wilcoxon on April 21, 2010.

Borowitz is a former Hollywood writer and producer, and she broaches a difficult subject with humor. I can see how this book might be valuable, and there are some points I could see returning to as reference. I appreciate this approach, but tired of it during this reading, although, I did laugh out loud a few times. A loan from a neighborhood acquaintance, this book's gist is: 1. Be yourself while raising your daughter(s). Do not attempt to be their best friend or keep them from advancing into adulthood. I, however, prefer Untangled by Lisa Damour, P. I hesitated to post this title on my goodreads booklist because I don't like the cover art. True.

The two worst times in a woman's life is when she is 13 and when her daughter is 13, or so goes a popular maxim in psychology circles.

When We're in Public, Pretend You Don't Know Me : Surviving Your Daughter's Adolescence So You Don't Look Like an Idiot and She Still Talks to You. by Susan Borowitz. The two worst times in a woman's life is when she is 13 and when her daughter is 13, or so goes a popular maxim in psychology circles.

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surviving your daughter's adolescences so you don't look like an idiot and she still talks to you. Published 2003 by Warner Books in New York.

Surviving Your Daughter's Adolescence So You Don't Look Like an Idiot and She Still Talks to Yo.

Surviving Your Daughter's Adolescence So You Don't Look Like an Idiot and She Still Talks to You. Susan Borowitz. Publisher Description.

Author : Susan Borowitz. Publisher : Hachette Book Group USA. Book Price. R.,143 on (Shipping charges may apply) R.,196 kart ( Rs. 70 Shipping Charges).

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The two worst times in a woman's life is when she is 13 and when her daughter is 13, or so goes a popular maxim in psychology circles.
I am preparing for a teenage daughter (in about 3 years) and am trying to open myself up to a variety of tactics to handle those bouts of emotions. This book was an easy read and came with a few laughs, to prepare for the onslaught of teenage cruelty. The author shares her experiences with the rest of us, but it is up to us to decide what is best for our children. As an Uncool mom in training, I recommend this book to glean different perspectives in adolescent separation.
I bet Laura Ingalls never rolled her eyes, snarled, "Get off my back, Ma!", or slam her door to sulk for hours on her hand-sewn patchwork quilt, or plot to elope with Almanzo Wilder into the moonlit fields.

Yep, the author may be correct that it's time for young women to eventually become independent adults, but the girls don't have to do it with arrogance or animosity against their own mothers. Oh, and I LIKED to shop with my mom when I was a teenager, BTW.

Written in a humorous vein, the author tries to offer her own insight about parenting today's self-absorbed female children in the culture of princesses, divas, and Lolitas wearing bright pink "Juicy" across their little buttocks, but here are a few mistakes she may have inevitably made:

A mother wonders why her fabulously gorgeous supermodel daughter keeps badmouthing herself and then makes negative comments about her own "lower than average" looks and other physical shortcomings.

The author says that it's time for the younger generation of women to be glorified as beautiful, desirable sex objects and then laments that older women don't get as much "respect" in today's society infatuated with the fantasy of flawless young girls.

And here's a truly BRILLIANT gem: "By the time your daughter is nine to eleven years old and approaching adolescence, she needs to know about the nature of foreplay, the mechanics of sexual intercourse, the dangers of sexually transmitted diseases, and the sexual practices that will keep her safe. (Forget teaching abstinence. It's wishful thinking and a waste of time!)" Wow. The dame who wrote this SHOULDN'T be surprised to be suddenly made a GRANDMOTHER by her underdeveloped 12-year-old who is still playing with Barbie dolls and My Little Pony!

Not only that, but the author also mentions that younger and younger girls are being tarted up lately. Gosh, how did that happen???

THAT is the problem plaguing - and also alienating - women of different generations today. We are idealizing youth a little too much while vilifying the natural progress of growing older, especially for women. That is causing a great rift between mothers and their daughters today as well as VICTIMIZING them (younger girls being stalked and even grabbed to be violated by pedophiles or used as sexual receptacles by their own boyfriends while older women slowly lose their own dignity and self-worth as people over the time - as well as their own husbands, who were "taught" that it's better to be with a much younger woman.)

Without this great difference, perhaps some mothers would no longer feel the need to be "Best Buds" to the most fashionable group: pampered teen brats. :P
Okay, I'm not a parent, let alone parent of a teenager...but I will be someday, and I'm interested, so I'm thinking about it and reading up. Here's what I'm thinking about this book:
I love it. It's wryly funny -- even occasionally hysterical -- and much of it rings true from watching my relatives bring up teenagers, being one not too long ago myself (though I didn't have some of the more extreme issues I notice in others), watching my own mom cope with me, and seeing the daily struggles between my peers and their moms when we were teens. There's a lot of "common sense" here, but don't let that statement fool you into thinking the book's useless; the best of us sometimes forget to exercise our "common" sense.
I particularly appreciate the ("common sense?") idea that moms should not fall into the trap of being "clueless" or the opposite trap of being your daughter's "cool" best friend. The best way to be both parent and friend is to be what Mrs. Borowitz calls "the uncool mom:" setting good boundaries, remaining in control, being yourself, picking your battles, and butting out when your daughter needs to manage on her own (which is more often than you think.) My own mother did a generally great job of this, and we are now what one might call "best friends" as adults -- still very much mother-daughter, but with mutual respect, friendship, and tolerance built out of (usually, and usually this was Mom's doing) handling our conflicts in a healthy way when I was a minor. This book is written by a mom who sounds a lot like mine...but even my mom could have learned something from her.
I have a 13 year old daughter, and this book really resonated with me. I was pleasantly surprised to find that I already fit in the "Uncool Mom" category, but I still learned a lot from the common sense tips. I also really enjoyed the way that this book is written, with humor and anecdotes that keep you in stitches while helping you understand your daughter just a little better.

My one problem with the book was when the author recommended not teaching abstinance. I do think that it's naive to ONLY teach abstinance, but I think teaching kids that abstinance is an option is very important. By not teaching abstinance at all, but teaching kids about safe sex, what they will hear is that they are expected to have pre-marital sex. When you teach abstinance AND safe sex in conjunction, you are telling them that if they don't want to, it's a valid choice and they should feel confident in it, and if they do choose to have sex, here's how to stay safe.
I am the mother of a 14 year-old girl. She's a great kid, but when she went away to camp for a month and people asked me if I missed her, I said, "NO."

I'm a pretty good mom; I used to teach teenagers, and I have some clue about what this age is about. Still, Borowitz's book had me laughing out loud, and while I was laughing, some new ideas slipped in. Life post-camp is looking a little brighter.
I really liked this book except for one thing which echoes what a previous reviewer said. teens can and do abstain. I know quite a few of them. people in the media saying that kids cant abstain so teaching abstinance leads to a downward spiral: who wants to try and do the impossible.

this aside though, this is an excellent book. I read some of the parts to my husband and we wondered if this woman has been in our home eavesdropping.