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In Patagonia epub

by Bruce Chatwin


In Patagonia epub

ISBN: 0330256440

ISBN13: 978-0330256445

Author: Bruce Chatwin

Category: Reference

Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides

Language: English

Publisher: Picador (March 9, 1979)

Pages: 192 pages

ePUB book: 1747 kb

FB2 book: 1110 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 179

Other Formats: txt azw mobi docx





Bruce Chatwin was born in 1940, and was the author of In Patagonia, The Viceroy of Ouidah, On the Black Hill, The Songlines, and Utz. The last three he considered works of fiction

Bruce Chatwin was born in 1940, and was the author of In Patagonia, The Viceroy of Ouidah, On the Black Hill, The Songlines, and Utz. The last three he considered works of fiction. His other books are What Am I Doing Here, Anatomy of Restlessness, and Far Journeys, a collection of his photographs that also includes selections from his travel notebooks. Chatwin died outside Nice, France, on January 17, 1989. Nicholas Shakespeare wrote a biography of Bruce Chatwin that was published in 2000

Bruce Chatwin (1940–1989) was the author of In Patagonia, The Viceroy of Ouidah, On the Black Hill, The Songlines, and Utz. His other books are What Am I Doing Here and Anatomy of Restlessness, posthumous anthologies o. .

Bruce Chatwin (1940–1989) was the author of In Patagonia, The Viceroy of Ouidah, On the Black Hill, The Songlines, and Utz. His other books are What Am I Doing Here and Anatomy of Restlessness, posthumous anthologies of shorter works, and Far Journeys, a collection of his photographs that also includes selections from his travel notebooks.

In Patagonia is an English travel book by Bruce Chatwin, published in 1977. During the Second World War Chatwin and his mother stayed at the home of his paternal grandparents, who had a curiosity cabinet that fascinated him. Among the items it contained was a "piece of brontosaurus" (actually a mylodon, a giant sloth), which had been sent to Chatwin's grandmother by her cousin Charles Amherst Milward.

Charles Bruce Chatwin was an English novelist and travel writer. He spent six months in the area, a trip which resulted in the book In Patagonia (1977). This work established his reputation as Charles Bruce Chatwin was an English novelist and travel writer. He won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his novel On the Black Hill (1982)  . In 1972, Chatwin interviewed the 93-year-old architect and designer Eileen Gray in her Paris salon, where he noticed a map of the area of South America called Patagonia, which she had painted. I've always wanted to go there," Bruce told her.

Charles Bruce Chatwin (13 May 1940 – 18 January 1989) was an English travel writer, novelist and journalist. His first book, In Patagonia (1977), established Chatwin as a travel writer, although he considered himself instead a storyteller, interested in bringing to light unusual tales. He won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his novel On the Black Hill (1982), while his novel Utz (1988) was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize

Bruce Chatwin, Nicholas Shakespeare. The book that redefined travel writing' Guardian. Bruce Chatwin sets off on a journey through South America in this wistful classic travel book.

Bruce Chatwin, Nicholas Shakespeare. With its unique, roving structure and beautiful descriptions, In Patagonia offers an original take on the age-old adventure tale.

Bruce Chatwin - 'In Patagonia'. Closely Observed Literature. In Patagonia' is, without a doubt, one of the greatest pieces of travel writing in all of literary history. It was so inventive and unorthodox that it changed the landscape of travel writing - many modern writers owe a massive debt of gratitude to Bruce Chatwin. Very highly recommended. You can also follow me here

IN PATAGONIA is English author Bruce Chatwin's 1977 debut book, a travelogue of roaming South America .

IN PATAGONIA is English author Bruce Chatwin's 1977 debut book, a travelogue of roaming South America. nia teems with evocative descriptions, remarkable bits of history, and unforgettable anecdotes.

In Patagonia is Bruce Chatwin's exquisite account of his journey through "the uttermost part of the earth," that stretch of land at the southern tip of South America, where bandits were once made welcome and Charles Darwin formed part of his "survival of the fittest" theory. Chatwin's evocative descriptions, notes on the odd history of the region, and enchanting anecdotes make In Patagonia an exhilarating look at a place that still retains the exotic mystery of a far-off, unseen land. An instant classic upon publication in 1977, In Patagonia remains a masterwork of literature.
When Bruce Chatwin’s classic and offbeat travel narrative “In Patagonia” first appeared in 1977, many readers didn’t know what to think of it. Its publication coincided with my sophomore year at seminary and—boggled down with theological tomes and a recently acquired fondness for the works of John D. MacDonald--I missed the event altogether. It was to be forty years before one of my children (they are all avid readers, God bless ‘em!) brought the book to my attention. Chatwin had been working with the (London) Sunday Times Magazine when an interview with the elderly architect Eileen Gray inspired him to see the varied and desolate area that lies at the southernmost tip of South America. The rumor (not exactly true) is that Chatwin left a note for his employer that read simply, “Have gone to Patagonia.”

Gone to Patagonia! How often have we on a day-dreamy kind of afternoon wanted to make the same journey? Patagonia is a region whose struggles and eccentricities are richly woven into the historical fabric of the South American continent. In modern times, Patagonia has been the refuge of scoundrels, outlaws, misfits of all kinds and individuals orphaned by time or by fate.

Nicholas Shakespeare’s introduction to the book is excellent and the book itself is one you will never forget. I read it this time for pleasure but will read it again someday to unravel some of its mysteries. There are too many names and dates and places to absorb on a first encounter with “In Patagonia.”

If you haven’t read it—do yourself a favor. Put aside that book that is boring you and read about this place called Patagonia which lies at the very ends of the Earth.

Reminiscent of Jack Kerouac’s “On the Road” and William Least-Heat Moon’s “Blue Highways,” Chatwin’s “In Patagonia” will grip you and never let you go.
One of the greatest travel books of all time. While not specifically a 'Rick Steves' guide to Patagonia, it is more like "On the Road." Meant to be a very personal account of his travels, and his knowledge of this strange part of the world. It has been proven since it's publication to be full of fictional or not properly recreated stories, but regardless, you will never forget this book. Still a classic after nearly forty years. Chatwin's writing is almost dreamlike at times, and others, when he slides back into a story of Darwin, or rounding the Cape in a square rigger a hundred years before, is incredible. If you are a writer or wanting to be one, you could do worse than read this book simply for the astonishingly beautiful passages. It is on my bookshelf next to Herodotus and the diaries of Marco Polo.
Extraordinary account of the Bruce Chatwin's travels through the Patagonian steppe to Tierra del Fuego. Infused with historical stories that provide a backdrop for the lands he visits, the story here is remarkable.

An artifact belonging to his family provides the gravity that pulls him to the southern reaches of South America. He realizes from the beginning the artifact is likely apocryphal, but that becomes an essential element to the story as it lends a fantastical air to the voyage, as if he's visiting some storybook land. You have to remind yourself as you're reading this that it is a very real, but very exotic, place.

During the course of reading this, it struck me that Chatwin spends little time describing the physical surroundings, which is odd considering this is known to be a region of breathtaking, albeit stark, beauty. When contrasted with his careful depictions of the people, it dawned on me the essence of Patagonia that he conveys here is the hardscrabble people who have come here looking for a better life and found backbreaking toil and harsh conditions. A couple of generations of that produces a distinctive populace and you then realize, for all it's beauty, Patagonia is less a place than a mentality. Fiercely independent, weathered and cragged could be used interchangeably to describe the place or the people.
I read this book after having been to Argentina. It puts the people and landscape into perspective. Chatwin was a master storyteller who provided rich descriptions of the lives and scenery of one of the most interesting places in the world. He also provided information about all of the out of the way places and sights that people miss when visiting a country. This book should be on the "must read" list for all armchair and actual travelers.
I read this as we were touting Patagonia and was happy I had witnessed some of the landscapes Chatwin had described. Also, we had the opportunity to meet some rugged individualists who hearken to some of the characters Chatwin encounters. What was amazing is that Chatwin was traveling more than forty years ago when the wilds of Patagonia were even wilder. Loved how he wove the tale of Butch Cassidy throughout. The author was himself quite the adventurer. Fascinating tales.
Having spend a couple of months in Patagonia myself this rekindled memories and the romance of a bygone era. As a Welsh speaker I found Welsh Patagonia to be a fascinating glimpse into hat was important for our forefathers. Welsh Patagonia exemplifies how different cultures evolve given different circumstances
Chatwin's book is a classic for a reason; it's a terrific read, whether you've been to Patagonia or not--and if you have, or are anticipating going there, it will add depth to your experience of the place and the people.
This is a delightful book for its characters and vivid imagery. Some of the many tales are disturbing, but they tell of life and death at the end of the world in Patagonia. It is worth reading, even if you do not plan to go there.