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Musical Resources for the Revised Common Lectionary epub

by Arthur Wenk


Musical Resources for the Revised Common Lectionary epub

ISBN: 0810829096

ISBN13: 978-0810829091

Author: Arthur Wenk

Category: Reference

Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides

Language: English

Publisher: Scarecrow Press (June 1994)

Pages: 630 pages

ePUB book: 1117 kb

FB2 book: 1908 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 874

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Books by Arthur Wenk.

Books by Arthur Wenk.

oceedings{Wenk1994MusicalRF, title {Musical resources for the Revised common lectionary}, author . It is conceived in terms of a specific calendar of readings, but may be employed wherever musical choices are to be based on scriptural references.

oceedings{Wenk1994MusicalRF, title {Musical resources for the Revised common lectionary}, author {Arthur B. Wenk}, year {1994} }. Arthur B. Wenk.

A handbook that offers assistance to ministers, organists, and choir directors interested in selecting hymns, organ music, and choral music appropriate to the lesson appointed for worship

A handbook that offers assistance to ministers, organists, and choir directors interested in selecting hymns, organ music, and choral music appropriate to the lesson appointed for worship.

Musical Resources for the Revised Common Lectionary. The theories of Lerdahi and Jackendoff, and those of Baroni and Jacoboni provide the foundation of a project to define closely the style of Debussy based on the identification of 92 melodic phrases.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Arthur Wenk books online. Musical Resources for the Revised Common Lectionary. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles.

Prayers of Intercession for Common Worship.

DAILY LECTIONARY READINGS: Daily readings expand the range of biblical reading in worship and personal devotion by providing daily citations for the full three-year cycle of the Revised Common Lectionary. These readings complement the Sunday and festival readings: Thursday through Saturday readings help prepare the reader for the Sunday ahead; Monday through Wednesday readings help the reader reflect on and digest what they heard in worship.

Great resource for selecting music that fits with readings from the lectionary. If your church uses the RCL, this book is worth getting. The book itself is great. The Kindle version is problematic, though.

The Revised Common Lectionary is a lectionary of readings or pericopes from the Bible for use in Protestant Christian worship, making provision for the liturgical year with its pattern of observances of festivals and seasons

The Revised Common Lectionary is a lectionary of readings or pericopes from the Bible for use in Protestant Christian worship, making provision for the liturgical year with its pattern of observances of festivals and seasons. It was preceded by the Common Lectionary, assembled in 1983, itself preceded by the COCU Lectionary, published in 1974 by the Consultation on Church Union (COCU).

Musical Resources for the Revised Common Lectionary more. Publication Date: 1997. Publication Date: 1976. Publication Name: The Musical Times. Publication Name: Notes. Impressionism in Music more. Varieties of Analysis more. Each melody is parsed according to a paradigm derived from Baroni and Jacoboni.

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If you're a church organist / choir director you will appreciate the particular challenges of picking music for Sunday worship. The music should reinforce the message of the scripture and the sermon ... the Revised Common Lectionary (to be -finally- officially adopted by all major denominations beginning with Advent of 2010) prescribes the scripture readings for every Sunday, on a three-year cycle. The United Methodists have been using it for a while, and they publish a "worship planner" every year with hymn and anthem suggestions. I have seen an Episcopal version of these books as well. The problem with this scheme is that you have to keep shelling out $25 or more every year for these "worship planners" because even though the lectionary repeats after three years, the calendar dates of the Sundays keeps changing, because Easter is a movable date and Christmas is a fixed date .. it gets rather complicated, but there is a system. If you have, for example, a recent edition of the Book of Common Prayer, it explains how to figure out which lectionary day corresponds with which Sunday in any given year. Another disadvantage to the perpetual buying of denominational Worship Planners is: they tend to draw exclusively from that denomination's main resources (your hymnal, its supplement, and the choral anthem book put out by your hymnal's publisher.)

This book is the practical answer to the annual, denominational Lectionary Worship Planner. It contains ALL THREE lectionary years in one volume. It is ecumenical (draws from nine major hymnals and more than 50 choir books and organ-music publications .. so you're bound to have at least a few of them in your church's music library.)

The first section consists of the lectionary calendar. Each page gives: The date or range of dates where that Sunday will fall .. the scripture readings for that Sunday .. organ music, choir music, and hymn suggestions for that Sunday. Organ music has average duration noted (in minutes:seconds format). Vocal music has a note indicating allusion to scripture (if any), an indication if vocal arrangement is not SATB, and information on where to find it (author's / composer's name for organ music and Senior Choir selections; sourcebook abbreviation for Junior Choir selections and hymns.)

The next section is a 142-page Scriptural Index to hymn texts, from nine major North American hymnals (Methodist, Presbyterian, Lutheran, Epsicopal, United Church of Christ, Anglican Church of Canada) .. actually it's 8.5 hymnals, since "Songs For a Gospel People" is a non-denominational hymnal supplement. The index starts with Genesis and goes through to Revelation. Hymns corresponding to each passage or verse are listed by number, with an abbreviation indicating in which hymnal they can be found at that number. The index lists each hymn only once, but there is a lot of duplication of material between hymnals, so they are also listed by title, allowing you to find hymns elsewhere if you don't have the specific hymnal listed for the item you are looking for.

Next is an index of organ preludes based on hymn tunes, listed alphabetically by tune name. For each tune there are usually several preludes based on it, drawn from four or five books of organ preludes. This is followed by a list of equivalent tune names, since some tunes go under aliases in different hymnals. THIS is followed by a list of melodic incipits for 24 German tunes which are most notorious for having multiple names (or multiple tunes sharing one name) in English hymnals.

Next we have a Scriptural Index of anthems, following roughly the same format as the hymn index. This is followed by a Seasonal Index of anthems which, while not containing any specific scriptural allusion, are appropriate for specific seasons of the Christian year. Anthems that are based on a hymn tune have the name of that tune indicated in curly brackets in the listing, and these tunes are indexed in an Index of Hymn Tunes for the anthems.

In the appendix there is a list of organ works cited, listed alphabetically by composer. After this, a similar index of choral works cited.

Immense effort has been expended to make this book as useful as possible to the Music Director of any mainline church. It's a bit pricey, but will have paid for itself after four years of not buying those annual Worship Planning guides (less if you can get it used!) My only complaint is that this book was published in 1994; I know that a few denominations (Lutherans and UCC for sure, maybe others) have issued new hymnals since then. It would be nice to have an updated edition of the "Musical Resource" to include this new material.
Musical Resources for the RCL is useful for organists and choir directors, but you're nuts if you think I'm going to prepare a fifteen minute prelude from the major repertoire and a ten minute postlude, also from the major repertoire. My time is better spent on sensible chorale preludes based on hymn tunes that my congregation will recognize. An abridged Widor Toccatta Number 5 Final movement is appropriate on Easter, but postludes need only take 3 minutes. Most directors/organists in churches in towns, cities, and suburbs would find this volume excessive in the organ repertoire, but worth considering when searching for anthems based on the lectionary. The cross referencing material is a useful organization of the resources. I might do one myself based on repertoire more suited for smaller churches rather than idealized cathedral settings which only a few musicians get.