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The Ferrell Brothers of Baseball epub

by Dick Thompson


The Ferrell Brothers of Baseball epub

ISBN: 0786420065

ISBN13: 978-0786420063

Author: Dick Thompson

Category: Reference

Subcategory: Encyclopedias & Subject Guides

Language: English

Publisher: McFarland & Company (March 2005)

Pages: 316 pages

ePUB book: 1573 kb

FB2 book: 1394 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 274

Other Formats: docx lrf rtf lrf





Dick Thompson serves us well by giving us the complete baseball bios of a couple of very good non-New York players . Smoothly written, with meticulous attention paid to detail, The Ferrell Brothers of Baseball is both informative and enjoyable.

Dick Thompson serves us well by giving us the complete baseball bios of a couple of very good non-New York players from the golden era. We need more such books. Every facet of Wes's career is examined in detail, and brother Rick gets decent coverage, while Thompson keeps us up with the brothers who never made the Majors, as well. Photographs, statistics, and some very interesting sports cartoons nicely enhance the text. Put simply, it's the kind of book that makes you want to hear more from its knowledgeable author.

Here is the baseball history of three brothers. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Ferrell Brothers of Baseball as Want to Read

Here is the baseball history of three brothers  . Start by marking The Ferrell Brothers of Baseball as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Arguments in favor of inducting Ferrell into the Baseball Hall of Fame include the factors which affected his numbers and lack of post-season success. Thompson, Dick (March 11, 2005). The Ferrell Brothers of Baseball. ISBN 978-0-7864-2006-3. In addition to the era in which he played, he didn't play for many good teams, and he pitched in hitter-friendly parks. In his book, The Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract, Bill James, noted that Ferrell's high career ERA of . 4 is not surprising due the heavy-hitting era in which he played. George was the eldest of the trio and the local hero. He played, managed and scouted in professional baseball for 50 years. Rick was the cerebral baseball brother. He devoted 60 years to the game in such capacities as college player, eight-time major league all-star, coach, scout and major league executive.

Richard Benjamin Ferrell (October 12 1905 – July 27 1995) was an American catcher in Major League Baseball, and a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. Strong and durable, Ferrell was an outstanding catcher for the St. Louis Browns, Boston Red Sox and Washington Senators between 1929 and 1947. He retired having caught 1,806 games, an American League record that stood until Carlton Fisk surpassed it in 1988.

Americans have periodically been reminded of baseball's extraordinary capacity to enrich and enliven the national spirit during hard . Все результаты Поиска книг Google » Об авторе (2013).

Americans have periodically been reminded of baseball's extraordinary capacity to enrich and enliven the national spirit during hard times. Breaking the Slump is a vivid portrait of the great game and its cultural significance during America's hardest times. Все результаты Поиска книг Google Об авторе (2013). Charles C. Alexander is Distinguished Professor of History at Ohio University. He is the author of the biographies Ty Cobb, John McGraw, and Rogers Hornsby, and of Our Game: An American Baseball History. He lives in Athens, Ohio.

Dick Thompson: The Ferrell Brothers of Baseball, McFarland, Jefferson, NC, 2005. Some high school data is courtesy David McWater. Many historical player head shots courtesy of David Davis.

The Ferrell Brothers of Baseball. ISBN 9780786420063 (978-0-7864-2006-3) Softcover, McFarland & Company, 2005. Find signed collectible books: 'The Ferrell Brothers of Baseball'. Improvising the blues (Silver Burdett music). Coauthors & Alternates.

He has written for Nine, The Cooperstown Symposium, The National Pastime and Base Ball, and is the author of several baseball books. He lives in Chelmsford, Massachusetts. An appendix offers a year-by-year statistical look at the baseball careers of all seven Ferrell brothers including date of birth, height, weight, league, team, position, and averages, among other data. Download The Ferrell Brothers of Baseball by Dick Thompson free. The Ferrell Brothers of Baseball by Dick Thompson fb2 DOWNLOAD FREE.

Here is the baseball history of three brothers. George was the eldest of the trio and the local hero. He played, managed and scouted in professional baseball for 50 years. Rick was the cerebral baseball brother. He devoted 60 years to the game in such capacities as college player, eight-time major league all-star, coach, scout and major league executive. Wes was the natural. He was as talented as anyone who ever set foot on a baseball diamond and as good as any pitcher who ever threw a ball. This work chronicles the Ferrell family history with a major emphasis on George, Rick, and Wes; all the baseball doings; and includes numerous photographs. An appendix offers a year-by-year statistical look at the baseball careers of all seven Ferrell brothers including date of birth, height, weight, league, team, position, and averages, among other data.
Dick Thompson serves us well by giving us the complete baseball bios of a couple of very good non-New York players from the golden era. We need more such books. Every facet of Wes's career is examined in detail, and brother Rick gets decent coverage, while Thompson keeps us up with the brothers who never made the Majors, as well.

Baseball biographers generally come in two varieties: those that tell anecdotes and get a lot of baseball facts wrong, and those that do more original research using contemporary newspaper game accounts, and who seem to own a copy of the Baseball Encyclopedia for fact-checking. As a SABR researcher, Thompson certainly fits the latter style. Unfortunately, his game-by-game accounts of Wes's seasons become dreary reading. And while the reader might like to know something about the personal lives of the brothers, such is hardly to be found. Only on page 249, in a very passing reference concerning a time after Wes's MLB career was over, do we glean that Wes ever had a wife.

Sticking with the baseball stats, Dick Thompson's forte, we are on firmer ground. Thompson appears to want to justify writing the biography by making Wes Ferrell Hall of Fame worthy. He becomes too much the Wes apologist though. In general, few runs are scored against him without his fielders being to blame.

More fundamental statistical tinkering is unworthy of such a SABR researcher though. There are two main instances. To proclaim Wes the best pitcher of 1930, over Lefty Grove, requires contortions that should qualify Thompson for the Cirque du Soleil. His main argument is that Ferrell was better because Grove didn't have to pitch to the powerful A's lineup. Other arguments involve hair-splitting of insignificant stats that Ferrell doesn't win without the hair-splitting, while ignoring the major stats by which pitchers are judged.

Most ironic is Thompson's use of numbers showing that Wes hit more home runs in support of himself than any of his teammates in 1933 to show that he was a victim of lack of run support. Most baseball saber-metricians would immediately notice that the argument is clearer for the fact that Wes pitched in the most pitcher-friendly park in baseball through most of his hey-day. If anything, his comparative stats should be judged in light of what numbers Grove or Gomez might have put up in Municipal Stadium.

Wes put up some good numbers, and he had those four 20-win seasons at the start of his career. I like reading about players like him, and I feel generally well served by Thompson's book. But the fellow doth protest way too much. Using the main stats to judge quality of pitching: ERA, innings pitched to hits, IP to walks, strikeouts to walks, etc., Wes was good, but not HOF material.
Dick Thompson's The Ferrell Brothers of Baseball is an excellent read. It's a fascinating look at a fascinating era of baseball. The game in 1930s and 40s provides the backdrop for this in-depth biography of a family that had nine of its members in a baseball uniform at one time or another. The main focus, however, is on the three oldest Ferrell brothers: Wes, perhaps the best hitting pitcher ever in the game, a six time 20 game winner whose career was cut short by a sore arm, his older brother Rick, a Hall of Fame catcher who devoted his life to the game in a number of roles from player to executive, and George, the eldest, the "local hero" who was an inspiration to all. Along the way, and capturing the "feel" of the times, we get candid glimpses of Dizzy Dean, Lefty Grove, Jimmy Foxx, Carl Hubble, Joe Dimaggio, and many other enduring baseball legends. Smoothly written, with meticulous attention paid to detail, The Ferrell Brothers of Baseball is both informative and enjoyable. Photographs, statistics, and some very interesting sports cartoons nicely enhance the text. Put simply, it's the kind of book that makes you want to hear more from its knowledgeable author.
Dick Thompson, winner of the Society for American Baseball Researches' lifetime achievement award, has penned a fascinating read about Wes and Rick Ferrell. Thompson builds a persuasive argument that Ferrell at his peak was as effective as the formidable Lefty Grove. Sabermetricians may decry Thompson's controversial conclusions, but he painstakingly reveals that Grove was consistently kept from facing the Yanks, while Ferrell routinely opposed the Bombers and other top clubs.

Although brother Rick's Hall of Fame credentials are questionable, Thompson's portrait truly fleshes out the man behind the numbers, breathing life into one of Cooperstown's most debated honorees. Ferrell remained in the game for years, touching and effecting many baseball lives. You may not agree with Rick's induction, but at least Thompson provides a much needed rationale. This is a must have book for historians and fans alike.
Thompson recreates the depression era game and gives full portraits of the two greatest siblings in baseball history. Unlike some of his reviewers, he is in complete charge of his facts--Jimmie Foxx, Joe DiMaggio and Carl Hubbell all appear in depth in Thompson's book along with most of the many other contemporary stars of the Ferrell brothers and their names in each case are spelled correctly. In fact--and this is truly a rarity in books nowadays--I did not find even so much as a typo. Thompson also apparently had access to many old Ferrell family photos, giving his book an important added flavor.