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Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning epub

by Gary Marcus


Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning epub

ISBN: 1594203172

ISBN13: 978-1594203176

Author: Gary Marcus

Category: Photo

Subcategory: Music

Language: English

Publisher: Penguin Press; First Edition edition (January 19, 2012)

Pages: 288 pages

ePUB book: 1459 kb

FB2 book: 1805 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 516

Other Formats: doc mbr lit lrf





I enjoyed GUITAR ZERO immensely. Marcus has not only intensified the process itself but simplified the definition of one's dedication to it. His elaborate illustration will certainly cause many of us to better appreciate the gifts we've been blessed with.

I enjoyed GUITAR ZERO immensely. Pat Martino, four-time Grammy nominee - Pat Martino, four-time Grammy nominee.

I recommend it to all musicians, parents, and anyone interested in the science of learning, guitar playing and music in general. Marcus states, Music is the perfect storm for the human mind: beautiful in form, intricate, and eternally new. (. 45) I wholeheartedly agree. Apr 16, 2012 Luiz Felipe rated it liked it. Interesting book, though not quite what I wanted to read. Gary Marcus is a PhD in cognitive psychology who decides to pick up the guitar (and to learn music) later in life.

On the eve of his fortieth birthday, renowned cognitive scientist Gary Marcus decided to fulfil a lifelong dream and learn to play the guitar

On the eve of his fortieth birthday, renowned cognitive scientist Gary Marcus decided to fulfil a lifelong dream and learn to play the guitar. He had tried many times before – failing miserably. This time, he decided to use the tools of his trade to see if he might suceed. On his quest he jams with twelve-year-olds and takes master classes with guitar gods. A groundbreaking exploration of the allure of music, Guitar Zero is also an empowering case for the mind’s ability to grow throughout life. Self-Help Personal Growth. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate

It documents the author's process of learning the guitar while discussing aspects of music cognition and the role of critical periods in learning a musical ability. The book was released on January 19, 2012 and published by Penguin Books, and in December 2012 was released as a paperback under the title Guitar Zero: The Science of Becoming Musical at Any Age.

On the eve of his 40th birthday, scientist Gary Marcus decided to fulfil a lifelong dream and learn to play the guitar. In a quest that takes him from Suzuki classes to guitar gods, he discovers the best ways to train your brain and your body. A renowned neuroscientist with no musical talent investigates what it takes to make music. On the eve of his 40th birthday, scientist Gary Marcus decided to fulfil a lifelong dream and learn to play the guitar.

Gary Marcus used his scientific knowledge to show you can teach an old dog new tricks – even to play guitar like a. .Extracted from Guitar Zero – The Science of Learning to be Musical by Gary Marcus, published by Oneworld.

Gary Marcus used his scientific knowledge to show you can teach an old dog new tricks – even to play guitar like a musical genius (well, near enough).

Gary is an expert on learning processes and as someone who taught himself to play guitar at the age of 38, I.He's a professor of psychology at NYU and author of the book Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning. Thanks for being here, Gary.

Gary is an expert on learning processes and as someone who taught himself to play guitar at the age of 38, I thought his perspective would be interesting. So, I sat down with him to discuss how we learn music at different life stages and just how music affects our brains. CARA SANTA MARIA: Hi everybody. GARY MARCUS: Thanks for having me. CSM: You wrote in this book that you decided to learn how to play guitar when you were thirty-eight years old.

Guitar Zero: The New Musi. has been added to your Cart. a renowned scientist with no discernible musical talent learns to play the guitar and investigates how anyone- of any age-can become musical. Do you have to be born musical to become musical Do you have to start at the age of sixUsing the tools of his day job as a cognitive psychologist. Gary Marcus becomes his own guinea pig as he takes up the guitar. So, I stumbled on this book about five years later and the author went through the same type of experience but he questioned deeper and from a lot of other angles.

On the eve of his 40th birthday, Gary Marcus, a renowned scientist with no discernible musical talent, learns to play the guitar and investigates how anyone—of any age —can become musical. Do you have to be born musical to become musical? Do you have to start at the age of six? Using the tools of his day job as a cognitive psychologist, Gary Marcus becomes his own guinea pig as he takes up the guitar. In a powerful and incisive look at how both children and adults become musical, Guitar Zero traces Marcus’s journey, what he learned, and how anyone else can learn, too. A groundbreaking peek into the origins of music in the human brain, this musical journey is also an empowering tale of the mind’s enduring plasticity. Marcus investigates the most effective ways to train body and brain to learn to play an instrument, in a quest that takes him from Suzuki classes to guitar gods. From deliberate and efficient practicing techniques to finding the right music teacher, Marcus translates his own experience—as well as reflections from world-renowned musicians—into practical advice for anyone hoping to become musical, or to learn a new skill.Guitar Zero debunks the popular theory of an innate musical instinct while simultaneously challenging the idea that talent is only a myth. While standing the science of music on its head, Marcus brings new insight into humankind’s most basic question: what counts as a life well lived? Does one have to become the next Jimi Hendrix to make a passionate pursuit worthwhile, or can the journey itself bring the brain lasting satisfaction?For all those who have ever set out to play an instrument—or wish that they could—Guitar Zero is an inspiring and fascinating look at the pursuit of music, the mechanics of the mind, and the surprising rewards that come from following one’s dreams.
This basically is a book chronicling one person's journey to becoming musical at an advanced age. It is a very interesting read, and spends a lot of ink describing some of the science of the brain's processing sound and related topics. It touches on some other things like the history of music, but mostly not in a very deep way. It was meant to be a fairly short and quick read. It was interesting and informative, but it definitely does not teach you how to play a guitar. What it is, to me, is motivation. This book records one man's journey toward becoming a good guitarist and his thoughts and reflections along the way. It has many interesting bits of information about various musicians peppered throughout the book that did add quite a bit of interest.
When I first saw this book on Amazon, I was hesitant to buy it because it only had 3 1/2 stars. (Most books I read are 4+)

I dug deeper into the reviews to see that people expected something different. I decided to give it a shot anyway. And, after purchasing and reading the book, the description seem to match the product.

The story is arched around Dr. Marcus's journey to learn guitar at an advanced age, 38. He discusses the benefit as well as the disadvantages of music learning later in life and how it effected his quest to learn to play guitar.

I enjoyed the studies and theories that were shared. I will be looking for more books like this that mix psychology, learning methods, and music. Well done.
I picked up the guitar at the age of 40… I questioned if I'd be able to learn it or not and I basically told myself that I'd have to stick with it for a year before giving up. I bought a guitar and put in that year and at the end it started to sound like something and I've kept with it and it's been rewarding… But it raised that question in me of, can I do this and how difficult is it going to be….

So, I stumbled on this book about five years later and the author went through the same type of experience but he questioned deeper and from a lot of other angles. Not only was he going to give it a go at learning guitar but he was going to study the how and why if it was really possible to teach an old dog new tricks. (I'd read glad wells outliers, so was familiar with the 10,000 hour concept and that whole line of questioning, but this guy was asking about it for older folks and how much was possible once you weren't a kid anymore) I thought it would be an interesting read.

So, the author starts on this journey and takes you along for the ride. He talks about going to guitar camp, interviewing musicians, his learning style and how he progresses, what works and what doesn't…. He ends up in a band at camp with kids and they go after some basic song writing and performance goals and what that dynamic is like… I found the book really interesting because I'd been through some of what he'd experienced and also in trying to answer the questions of how to get better at something, which is something anyone can apply to anything they dare to learn.
A charming story by a neuroscientist who gives a blow by blow of his midlife attempt to become a guitarist from scratch. The story is interspersed with mini-lectures on music history, music theory, music education, and (most thoroughly) music and the brain. It proceeds with a light touch, but covers some heavy material. Not everything is at the level that a professional musicologist would like (especially the quick overview of 1000 years of music history), but almost everyone will learn something.
Nice memoir. In the end, the answer is yes, you can learn a new instrument as an adult, however, having a sabbatical of a year or more (as the author does) in which to learn, practice and jam with experts greatly increases your likelihood of success.
I enjoy this book very much. I can relate to what the author went through because I picked up a guitar later in life, at age 20, after always being told that I wasn't musical and that I was tone deaf. I went through many of the same things that the author went through. I really cracked up when he talked about the difficulty of learning the F chord, and being confused by the duplication of notes on the guitar neck. (I went through all of that too). Currently I get paid money to play music, and I have recorded two CDs of my own material. If "Guitar Zero" had been available when I started my journey years ago it would have saved me a lot of time and headaches. I would recommend it to any beginner who needs to find the shortcuts.
One area Marcus delves into is an area that I never thought about; the part of our brain that we use when playing music, and the fact that there really is no "musical" part of the brain. It's not something we need to know to be a good guitar player, but it's interesting.
This book felt contrived. There is next to no elaboration on how an adult should go about learning music in this book. The author basically said "Yes, you can learn to play music at any age..." and then methodically constructed stories to build an entire book around that one idea, detailing his motivation and experience. The book was well written and edited, but I was expecting more of a "How to" manual regarding how an adult learner should study music as opposed to a "look what you can do if you just try" story, so I feel as if I wasted my money.
I enjoyed this book immensely, both as a guitarist and a music educator. Gary Marcus sheds a lot of light on the learning process, especially in regard to musical instruments. It validated much of what I've intuited as a teacher but have never been able to articulate, and also opened a few doors. It's very readable - I don't have a strong science background, but he kept everything in layman's terms, which I appreciated! I recommend this book to my adult students, who frequently have preconceptions about learning an instrument. This is fascinating reading for any musician, teacher, or anyone in the process of learning a musical instrument (although I expect it applies to general learning, as well)!