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Andy Warhol Prince of Pop epub

by Sandra Jordan,Jan Greenberg


Andy Warhol Prince of Pop epub

ISBN: 0385900791

ISBN13: 978-0385900799

Author: Sandra Jordan,Jan Greenberg

Category: Photo

Subcategory: Individual Artists

Language: English

Publisher: Delacorte Press; Second Impression edition (January 1, 2004)

ePUB book: 1205 kb

FB2 book: 1619 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 651

Other Formats: txt lrf lrf lrf





Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan are the authors of numerous acclaimed books about art, including Vincent van Gogh: Portrait of an Artist; Action Jackson; Runaway . I really enjoyed the Andy Warhol, Prince of Pop book. It was very well written and enjoyable to read

Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan are the authors of numerous acclaimed books about art, including Vincent van Gogh: Portrait of an Artist; Action Jackson; Runaway Girl: The Artist Louise Bourgeois; and Chuck Close Up Close. The authors live in St. Louis, MO, and New York City respectively. It was very well written and enjoyable to read. I learned far more than I expected to.

Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan are the authors of numerous acclaimed books about art, including Vincent van Gogh: Portrait of an Artist; Action Jackson; Runaway Girl: The Artist Louise Bourgeois; and Chuck Close Up Close.

Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan are the authors of numerous acclaimed books about art, including Vincent van Gogh: Portrait of an Artist; Action Jackson; Runaway .

Sandra Jordan is the coauthor, with Jan Greenberg, of numerous acclaimed books about art, including Vincent van Gogh: Portrait of a. ore about Sandra Jordan.

About Andy Warhol, Prince of Pop. IN THE FUTURE EVERYBODY will be world famous for 15 minutes. The Campbell’s Soup Cans. Sandra Jordan is the coauthor, with Jan Greenberg, of numerous acclaimed books about art, including Vincent van Gogh: Portrait of a.

Andy Warhol by Jan Greenburg and Sandra Jordan is an interesting look into a very shy painter’s life.

Andy Warhol by Jan Greenburg and Sandra Jordan is an interesting look into a very shy painter’s life

Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan are the authors of numerous acclaimed books about art, including Vincent van Gogh: Portrait of an Artist; Action Jackson; Runaway Girl: The Artist Louise Bourgeois; and Chuck Close Up Close.

Prince of Pop. by Jan Greenberg & Sandra Jordan

Prince of Pop. by Jan Greenberg & Sandra Jordan. Greenberg and Jordan have set themselves a difficult task, writing the life of an individual who did his best to interpose a façade between himself and the world at all times, but they pull it off, in part by letting their subject’s metamorphosis govern their text.

Greenberg, Jan, 1942-; Jordan, Sandra (Sandra Jane Fairfax). Relates the artist's rise from poverty and obscurity to Pop icon, discussing his art, controversial films, and hip magazine.

It includes a timeline, a glossary of unfamiliar art terms, an extensive bibliography of sources, and is heavily illustrated with some of Warhol's most famous works.

by Jan Greenberg, Sandra Jordan. Books related to Andy Warhol, Prince of Pop. Skip this list. The work created by Andy Warhol elevated everyday images to art, ensuring Warhol a fame that has far outlasted the 15 minutes he predicted for everyone else. His very name is synonymous with the 1960s American art movement known as Pop. But Warhol’s oeuvre was the sum of many parts.

Nice
Biography lite. Good read for the train.
Well written but too concise. I was expecting more details. I was done with it in a day, and I'm a slow reader.
I really enjoyed the Andy Warhol, Prince of Pop book. It was very well written and enjoyable to read. I learned far more than I expected to. The book was so well researched. I would definitely read more books by this author.
I needed a book to do my final paper for school. This had every thing I needed to do my paper.
It's not every day that one reads a biography so insightful and compelling that one wants to go learn more about the subject. I first encountered ANDY WARHOL: PRINCE OF POP as an excerpt in RUSH HOUR: Volume Two - Bad Boys. The excerpt, covering the central controversial period of Warhol's celebrity in the 1960s, excited me so much that I knew I had to read more.

The rest of the biography does not disappoint. Organized in a linear narrative, the book covers Warhol's life, from his early childhood as the sickly child of Eastern European immigrants to his death at the age of 58 of complications after routine surgery. It organizes each period into thematic chapters filled with interesting anecdotes, pithy Warhol aphorisms, and memories from people who were there at the time.

Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan's extensive knowledge of the subject and in-depth research into Warhol's life make this book a treasure. It includes a timeline, a glossary of unfamiliar art terms, an extensive bibliography of sources, and is heavily illustrated with some of Warhol's most famous works. While intended as a biography for young adults, this book makes Warhol's life, work, and the art of his age accessible in a way that will appeal to readers of all ages.

One of the strongest aspects of the book is the authors' understanding and clear explanations of many of the art movements of the twentieth century. Also invaluable is the authors' illumination of the many processes Warhol used to produce his art, including painting, silk-screening, and experimental film.

It is difficult for biographers to avoid the trap of finding greatness in the origins of their subjects. This book contains many stories about the Warhol being drawn to art at an early age. However, the authors' careful plotting of the transformation of a shy and painfully awkward boy into the international celebrity also suggests that one of Andy's greatest creations was his own image as an artist.

ANDY WARHOL: PRINCE OF POP does not shy away from the racy subject matter of Warhol's experimental films or the raucous entourage he incorporated into his work in the 1960s. It also deals extensively, though not explicitly, with Warhol's homosexuality.

The work of Andy Warhol is so influential that even readers who do not know anything about him will probably recognize his famous paintings of Campbell soup cans, or his celebrity portraits silk-screened onto brightly colored backgrounds. Greenberg and Jordan's book is engaging and thought-provoking. It will undoubtedly set the standard for young adult biographies for years to come.

--- Reviewed by Sarah A. Wood
If you're only going to read one book about Warhol, this would be a good choice. It was the "Goldilocks pick" among three I read, one for children (too thin, though it was fun seeing how his life was dumbed-down-but-not-too-sanitized for kids' reading), one too academic (too thick, all tell, no show), this one juuusst right, really captured the flavor and excitement of Andy's world. Highly recommended. (But where are the pix? Not in the Kindle version, at least. Ironically, only the kids' version was illustrated. But that's what click-on-Wikipedia is for, I guess.)
" 'We weren't just at the art exhibit. We were the exhibit.' "

On Saturday night, October 20, 1973, during my first semester at UConn, I accompanied some of my new friends to an on-campus screening of Andy Warhol's Trash. It is an evening that I will never forget, although its significance has only partially to do with Warhol's raunchy "artistic" film, whose cast was immortalized in Lou Reed's "Walk on the Wild Side."

" 'Scripts bore me. It's much more exciting not to know what's going to happen.' "

On our way to the theater, my friends detoured by way of a subterranean eatery on the south end of campus. Back then, the establishment was still adorned in original '50s dark leatherette, accompanied by chrome, pennants, mirrors, and a soda fountain. Parking me in a corner while they ordered themselves some slices, I zoned in on the radio as the music was interrupted by a news bulletin: President Nixon had just forced Attorney General Richardson and Assistant Attorney General Ruckelshaus to resign after their refusals to fire Watergate Special Prosecutor Archibald Cox. Solicitor General Bork then proceeded to do the deed for Tricky Dick, and I proceeded to experience a surreal evening of having my eyes aimed at a screenful of junkies, prostitutes, and transvestites, while my mind kept repeating hysterically, "No! He can't do that! No! He can't do that!"

(Robert Bork later got his second fifteen minutes of fame, as a failed Reagan Supreme Court nominee, and continues to get an additional five or ten seconds each time I explain to middle school classes the origin of Rodman Philbrick's phraseology, "That really borks me off," when we read them THE LAST BOOK IN THE UNIVERSE.)

But I seriously digress.

" 'Now and then people would accuse me of being evil--of letting people destroy themselves while I watched, just so I could film or tape record them,' Andy said. 'But I learned when I was little that whenever I got aggressive and tried to tell someone what to do, nothing happened. I just couldn't carry it off.' "

In the long run it can be argued that Andy Warhol and his complex life became much larger than his art. But the rise of Andy Warhol was the result of a simple and logical progression.

An artistic son of eastern European immigrants grows up to become a successful commercial artist.

"Pittsburgh was far from New York, but the lessons Andy had learned in his hometown--work hard and work fast--were already serving him well."

A commercial artist is someone who is creating interesting and appealing images of products for sale. And the slight, pale, hardworking subject of this book was an absolute master at it. So when a new art movement coincidentally appeared--Pop Art--that involved the incorporation of everyday objects and newspaper images in paintings, who would have been a more likely person to rise and become the prince of that movement than this true master of commercial art?

And who better to tell the fascinating life story of such a controversial artist and cryptic individual than that dynamic duo of artist biographers, Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan?

"For months Andy had been working hard, trying to find a subject to paint that was both fresh and visually stimulating."

The authors do a terrific job of conveying the tension that filled Warhol's determined quest to evolve from successful commercial artist to successful artist. Without that pivotal transition, of course, we wouldn't be talking about Andy Warhol forty-something years later.

"Eventually he painted a six-foot-tall Coke bottle--the curvy shape reproduced straightforwardly, larger than life, with the seriousness of high art. It was a breakthrough for him. Did he intend the Coke bottle as a still life or a satire on the female figure in painting? Certainly Andy never stopped to interpret his artwork; he was just trying to reinvent himself as a serious artist."

But, what's the story of his choosing the Campell's soup can? How did that happen?

"During this period, Andy fell into a depression. His mother constantly nagged him to send more money home to his brothers and their growing families in Pittsburgh. He felt torn between the financial security of commercial art and his ambition to be a great artist. He lay in bed, suffering from panic attacks. Afraid his heart would stop beating if he fell asleep, he would stay up all night talking on the phone to friends. It was on the telephone that he was most verbal, loving to hear gossip about celebrities and stories of his friends' love lives. Andy begged anybody and everybody for ideas. His friends grew used to hearing him moan. 'What should I paint?' They made plenty of suggestions, but nothing seemed right to him.

"Then one night at a party, he asked his usual question, only to receive an unusual response. Muriel Latow, an art consultant, said, 'I can give you an idea, but it's gonna cost you fifty dollars.' Latow had such a bright, sassy point of view that Andy believed she might well come up with a startling suggestion. He pulled out his checkbook.

" 'What do you like most in the world?' she asked him. 'You like money, you should paint that. And you should paint something that everybody sees everyday...like cans of soup.'

"Andy wrote her a check on the spot."

And the rest, as they say, is history.

" 'Publicity is like eating peanuts, once you start you can't stop.' "

Guiding us through his studio, the galleries, parties, film sets, and multimedia presentations; from his near-assassination to the back room of Max's Kansas City, the authors provide an eye-opening look at the art scene and The Scene that Warhol created and nurtured. Years after his death, Andy Warhol's historic images of American icons continue to play a role in our pop culture. ANDY WARHOL: PRINCE OF POP is an engrossing portrait of the man, his art, and the publicity machine he set in motion.