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Natural Language Computing: An English Generative Grammar in Prolog epub

by Ray C. Dougherty


Natural Language Computing: An English Generative Grammar in Prolog epub

ISBN: 0805815260

ISBN13: 978-0805815269

Author: Ray C. Dougherty

Category: Other

Subcategory: Social Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: Psychology Press; 1 edition (October 3, 1994)

Pages: 400 pages

ePUB book: 1516 kb

FB2 book: 1615 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 126

Other Formats: txt rtf lit mbr





Strings, Lists and Intonation in Garden Path Sentences: Can it, Plan it, or planet?" 2004, In C. Leclère, É. Laporte, M. Piot, & M. Silberztein (ed., Syntax, Lexis & Lexicon-Grammar: Papers in Honour of Maurice Gross, (Philadelphia: John Benjamins). Information Theory Defines 'Mathematically Conceivable Communication System'," 2007, Proceedings of the Biolinguistic Investigations Conference, Santo Domingo.

Artificial Intelligence Machines 21 . How to Read and Write in Prolog.

0285~dc20 94-5269 CIP Books published by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates are printed on acid-free paper, and their bindings are chosen for strength and durability. Printed in the United States of America 10 987654321. To my wife Claudia Leacock. Contents Preface vii Introduction: What is Computational Linguistics? xix How to Use this Book: A Pictorial Essay, xxix . Artificial Intelligence Machines 21 .

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The book begins with an indepth discussion of the old and the new theory of the computer intelligence and artificial intelligence machines. 4 people found this helpful.

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com User, September 9, 2005. It's a great book and easy to read.

com User, September 9, 2005. I am learning alot from it. 0. Report.

Ray C. Dougherty (born 1941) is an American linguist and a member of the . Dougherty (born 1941) is an American linguist and a member of the Arts and Science faculty at New York University. "Information Theory Defines 'Mathematically Conceivable Communication System'," 2007, Proceedings of the Biolinguistic Investigations Conference, Santo Domingo.

This book's main goal is to show readers how to use the linguistic theory of Noam Chomsky, called Universal Grammar, to represent English, French, and German on a computer using the Prolog computer language. In so doing, it presents a follow-the-dots approach to natural language processing, linguistic theory, artificial intelligence, and expert systems. The basic idea is to introduce meaningful answers to significant problems involved in representing human language data on a computer. The book offers a hands-on approach to anyone who wishes to gain a perspective on natural language processing -- the computational analysis of human language data. All of the examples are illustrated using computer programs. The optimal way for a person to get started is to run these existing programs to gain an understanding of how they work. After gaining familiarity, readers can begin to modify the programs, and eventually write their own.The first six chapters take a reader who has never heard of non-procedural, backtracking, declarative languages like Prolog and, using 29 full page diagrams and 75 programs, detail how to represent a lexicon of English on a computer. A bibliography is programmed into a Prolog database to show how linguists can manipulate the symbols used in formal representations, including braces and brackets. The next three chapters use 74 full page diagrams and 38 programs to show how data structures (subcategorization, selection, phrase marker) and processes (top-down, bottom-up, parsing, recursion) crucial in Chomsky's theory can be explicitly formulated into a constraint-based grammar and implemented in Prolog. The Prolog interpreters provided with the book are basically identical to the high priced Prologs, but they lack the speed and memory capacities. They are ideal since anything learned about these Prologs carries over unmodified to C-Prolog and Quintas on the mainframes. Anyone who studies the prolog implementations of the lexicons and syntactic principles of combination should be able to use Prolog to represent their own linguistic data on the most complex Prolog computer available, whether their data derive from syntactic theory, semantics, sociolinguistics, bilingualism, language acquisition, language learning, or some related area in which the grammatical patterns of words and phrases are more crucial than concepts of quantity. The printed examples illustrate C-Prolog on an Ultrix Vax, a standard university configuration. The disk included with the book contains shareware version of Prolog-2 (IBM PC) and MacProlog (Macintosh) plus versions of the programs that run on C-Prolog, Quintas, Prolog-2, and MacProlog. Appendix II contains information about how to use the Internet, Gopher, CompuServe, and the free More BBS to download the latest copies of Prolog, programs, lexicons, and parsers. All figures (100+) in the book are available scaled to make full size transparencies for class lectures. Valuable special features of this volume include: * more than 100 full page diagrams illustrating the basic concepts of natural language processing, Prolog, and Chomsky's linguistic theories; * more than 100 programs -- illustrated in at least one script file -- showing how to encode the representations and derivations of generative grammar into Prolog; * more than 100 session files guiding readers through their own hands-on sessions with the programs illustrating Chomsky's theory; * a 3.5" disk (IBM Format) containing: 1. all programs in versions to run in C-Prolog or Quintas Prolog on an Ultrix Vax, and on an IBM PC and a Macintosh, 2. a shareware version of Prolog-2 for IBM PC clones which runs all programs in the book, 3. a shareware version of MacProlog for Macintosh which runs all programs in the book; * instructions on using Internet, CompuServe, and the free More BBS to download the latest copies of Prolog, programs, lexicons, and parsers; and * numerous references enabling interested students to pursue questions at greater depth by consulting the items in the extensive bibliography.
Written by a student of Noam Chomsky, this book introduces the classic approach to natural language processing using Prolog. Prolog is a programming language used for writing programs that model human logic and decision making. It is particalarly well suited for natural language processing. The book assumes very limited computer programming knowledge, and should be especially useful to linguists who want to introduce themselves to natural language computing.

The book begins with an indepth discussion of the old and the new theory of the computer intelligence and artificial intelligence machines. Then it goes on to discusses topics such as, different levels of human language structure, morphological parsers, recursion (affixes on the affixes), regular and irregular morphology, rule governed creativity, top down and bottom up parsing. Practically every linguistic phenomenon discussed is accompanied with an example Prolog program.

This book is a must-have for any student of linguistics wishing to learn how to use the AI features of Prolog to do natural language computing.
It's a great book and easy to read. I am learning alot from it.