» » Compassion Fatigue: Coping With Secondary Traumatic Stress Disorder In Those Who Treat The Traumatized (Psychosocial Stress Series)

Compassion Fatigue: Coping With Secondary Traumatic Stress Disorder In Those Who Treat The Traumatized (Psychosocial Stress Series) epub

by Charles R. Figley


Compassion Fatigue: Coping With Secondary Traumatic Stress Disorder In Those Who Treat The Traumatized (Psychosocial Stress Series) epub

ISBN: 0876307594

ISBN13: 978-0876307595

Author: Charles R. Figley

Category: Other

Subcategory: Medicine & Health Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (May 1, 1995)

Pages: 292 pages

ePUB book: 1266 kb

FB2 book: 1349 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 609

Other Formats: mobi lit doc txt





The terms "compassion fatigue" and Secondary Traumatic Stress are used interchangeably (Figley, 1995).

The terms "compassion fatigue" and Secondary Traumatic Stress are used interchangeably (Figley, 1995). The pleasure derived from helping others and/or benefiting society through work results in Compassion Satisfaction (Stamm, 2010). In the current study we investigate how attempts to cope with secondary traumatic stress vary between investigators in the United States and their counterparts in the United Kingdom.

Traumatized (Psychosocial Stress Series) Hardcover – 26 Jun 1995

by. Charles R. Figley (Author).

Compassion Fatigue focuses on those individuals who provide therapy .

Compassion Fatigue book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Compassion Fatigue book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services Compassion Fatigue: Coping With Secondary Traumatic Stress .

Since the time of Florence Nightingale, nurses have experienced first-hand the inherent stress of caring for those who have been traumatized.

Routledge Published May 1, 1995 Reference - 292 Pages ISBN 9780876307595 - CAT RT7594 Series: Psychosocial Stress Series. What are VitalSource eBooks? Routledge Published June 17, 2013 Reference - 292 Pages ISBN 9780203777381 - CAT YE30429 Series: Psychosocial Stress Series. What are VitalSource eBooks? June 17, 2013 by Routledge Reference - 292 Pages ISBN 9780203777381 - CAT YE30429 Series: Psychosocial Stress Series.

Автор: Figley Charles R. Название: Compassion Fatigue: Coping with Secondary Traumatic Stress .

Any civilian mental-health practitioner who wants to understand the diverse needs of military personnel, their spouses, and their families will rely on this indispensable guidebook for years to come.

Secondary Traumatic Stress: Building Resilience for Professionals - Продолжительность: 1:55 . preventing and treating secondary traumatic stress.

preventing and treating secondary traumatic stress. Relaxing JAZZ For WORK and STUDY - Background Instrumental Concentration JAZZ for Work and Study - Продолжительность: 2:13:09 Relax Music Recommended for you.

Psychosocial Stress Series. Learn mor. ubject Categories. Mobile/eReaders – Download the Bookshelf mobile app at VitalSource.

Survival Strategies: A Framework for Understanding Secondary Traumatic Stress and Coping in Helpers.

First published in 1995. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
This book has been really helpful in my vicarious trauma class.
This text is a easy read and the quality of the book was in good condition. Seller mailed out my text in a timely manner and the listed price was more than reasonable.
I never really finished reading it. It is just too specific and exclusive. I use it to appear well read and to make allusions when i want people to understand that their way of compassion is just too seethrough and more a hypochritic action than anything else.
Designed as help for the therapist, it is also appropriate, and may be as or more important, for helpers who happen to be mothers, spouses, children, or even friends who find themselves suffering from the personal after-effects of being around physical, mental, emotional or psychological trauma of others - acting as mediators, menders, negotiators, and/or reservoirs of the pain and troubles of others. They may also need to address their own baggage of current or distant pain caused by disruptive circumstances in their own past to complicate the difficulty of handling multiple sources of distress and stress. Seen frequently in domestic violence situations, or arising from elder or ailing parents, or in trying to accommodate severe illness in anyone close to them, long term stress becomes the distress of psychological trauma. It may or may not be recognized by others, at work, or by those who are in a position to give relief. It may or may not be a known fact within the family where caregivers rarely allow themselves to acknowledge being weak, or in needing services themselves. Left unattended, the helper may become the person needing help, often some time beyond the time that help is being given (in the form of an aftershock) which may or may not be seen as having come from overextending themselves in serving the needs of others. Rescuer's remorse, it might be called, to identify the time when caregiver's come to assess the harm done to themselves and the need for recovery. It usually follows burn out in time when adjustment and incentive may be lacking with the realization of being psychologically or emotionally spent as well as physically tired and fatigued. It also happens to children (when in orphan situations, or even in single parent families) where they have been a primary emotional carrier of siblings, or younger children, a source of support for siblings, or even parents, in daily or sporadic struggles of emotional trauma. Often, refusing to give in to the need they also require for care, support and affection, they develop an overdeveloped sense of the "atlas-syndrome" where they cannot allow themselves to give in, for recognizing their own weakness, realizing they may not have a resource to turn to in that event. In denial of their own weakness, they forge onward without acknowledging their need for affection and solace. While admirable, it is also self destructive, however necessary they feel it to be. Long term deprivation of their own needs can have difficult emotional, physical, emotional and educational ramifications in addition to social consequences inconsistent with their desires and their intention to attain their own extraordinarily high defensive standards. Failure of society to recognize this vulnerable class of persons usually means that they are misunderstood, devalued, and may be mis-classified as social misfits rather than the begrudging individuals they are who willingly adopt the problems of others, sometimes to their own detriment.
This is a good introduction to "compassion fatique". For years we have known about burn out, but this is far more. The field is just now considering the possibility of secondary PTSD/O, but many of us, who have worked with trauma victims, have seen the signs of copassion fatique. As a supervisior, I have dealt with counselors and psychologists who work with trauma vitims who display copassion fatique. I recommend this book as start in the study of compassion fatique.
Calling it secondary trauamtic stress disorder or reactions, burnout, or compassion fatigue, professionals responsible for helping heal hurt, hurt themselves in the process. Anyone who does not recognize this does not do the work with compassion.
Figley stands out as a pioneer in compassion fatigue studies. This book was essential to my literature review for my Master's research paper and the work I did in New York City as a Red Cross caseworker in response to 9/11.
This is essential reading for therapists working with clients who have serious trauma in their lives. The book explains about "Secondary Traumatic Stress Disorder" which can depress and debilitate a therapist exposed to their client's trauma because of their own empathy and compassion. If you find yourself sobbing and depressed from the terrible things that your clients are going through, this book will be of invaluable help.