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DEFAULT_SET: Medical Devices: Managing the Mismatch epub

by World Health Organization


DEFAULT_SET: Medical Devices: Managing the Mismatch epub

ISBN: 9241564040

ISBN13: 978-9241564045

Author: World Health Organization

Category: Other

Subcategory: Medicine & Health Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: World Health Organization; 1 edition (December 7, 2010)

Pages: 143 pages

ePUB book: 1149 kb

FB2 book: 1713 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 613

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Choosing a medical device is complex and requires a transparent process based on reason, evidence and assessment of prioritized public health needs. Poor choices lead to inappropriate use or non-use of medical devices and a waste of resources

Choosing a medical device is complex and requires a transparent process based on reason, evidence and assessment of prioritized public health needs. Poor choices lead to inappropriate use or non-use of medical devices and a waste of resources.

WHO Library cation Data Medical devices: managing the mismatch: an outcome of. .

WHO Library cation Data Medical devices: managing the mismatch: an outcome of the priority medical devices project. quipment and supplies - standards. Requests for permission to reproduce or translate WHO publications whether for sale or for noncommercial distribution should be addressed to WHO Press, at the above address (fax: +41 22 791 4806; e-mail: [email protected]

Mobile version (beta). Medical Devices: Managing the Mismatch: An Outcome of the Priority Medical Devices Project. World Health Organization. Download (pdf, . 9 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

World Health Organization Scientific and Technical Publication No. 63. 636. 2012. php?option com content&view article&id 58&Itemid 55&lang enGoogle Scholar.

manage medical device acquisition budgets throughout the total product life. Trained Clinical Engineers (CE) and Biomedical Engineers (BE) have been recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) as the essential practitioners to providing this critically needed guidance. Over the past four years, a senior professional group participated in an international project that seeks evidence for the hypothesis - that the engagement of CE and BE in guiding HT - impacts positively on patient outcomes, while the alternative is that there is no difference.

Medicine & Health Sciences. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work. by. Kelley Lee (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with international public health. It was established on 7 April 1948, and is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland

The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with international public health. It was established on 7 April 1948, and is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. The WHO is a member of the United Nations Development Group. Its predecessor, the Health Organization, was an agency of the League of Nations.

World Health Organization, specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1948 to further international cooperation for improved public health conditions. Its tasks include epidemic control, quarantine measures, and drug standardization. Learn more about its history, organizational structure, and priorities. World Health Organization: vaccinationsWorld Health Organization workers preparing vaccinations in Mariscal Estigarribia, Paraguay. PAHO/World Health Organization.

While medical devices offer opportunities for improved diagnosis and management of disease, they also can carry substantial risks. Governmental regulatory bodies considering new medical device approval balance the goals of expanding therapeutic options with safeguarding public health.

Choosing a medical device is complex and requires a transparent process based on reason, evidence and assessment of prioritized public health needs. Poor choices lead to inappropriate use or non-use of medical devices and a waste of resources.This report suggests how an agenda to improve access to appropriate medical devices could be devised from applying the crucial 4 components―Availability, Accessibility, Appropriateness, and Affordability―to the 15 global high-burden diseases and some cross-cutting issues. The results of this exercise suggest several areas of research necessary to help make medical devices more available, accessible, appropriate, and affordable.Examples include: development of a kit containing simple and affordable technologies for measuring blood pressure, blood glucose and cholesterol levels, which could assess cardiovascular risk; developing portable, affordable spirometry equipment for accurate diagnosis and prognosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma in low-resource settings; and the development of more appropriate hearing aids which could potentially help people with hearing impairments whatever their age or setting. An example of a key cross-cutting issue is the need to develop simple, affordable, and reliable sensitivity tests for bacterial and viral antigens. Such tests could replace culture systems to detect the presence of pathogens and effectively and efficiently help to diagnose many high-burden infections and neglected tropical diseases. The Priority Medical Devices (PMD) project applied the "4 A" questions to some examples of identified key medical devices to further explore the downstream issues associated with poor access to appropriate medical devices.The PMD project hopes all players in the medical device arena can collectively use the findings of this report to help make public health a central focus of their activities, along with the work on policies, tools and innovations of the WHO Global Initiative for Health Technologies.