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Neuropsychological Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury epub

by Catherine A. Mateer,Sarah A. Raskin


Neuropsychological Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury epub

ISBN: 0195085272

ISBN13: 978-0195085273

Author: Catherine A. Mateer,Sarah A. Raskin

Category: Other

Subcategory: Medicine & Health Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (November 11, 1999)

Pages: 312 pages

ePUB book: 1654 kb

FB2 book: 1812 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 129

Other Formats: mobi doc doc docx





Neuropsychological Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. Sarah A. Raskin, Catherine A. Mateer.

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Sarah A. Oxford University Press, 11 нояб. Self-regulation and self-management of both cognitive failures and emotional responses are described as appropriate and effective in this population. Despite the importance of the problem, strikingly little has been written about effective approaches to the treatment of individuals with mild to moderate brain injury. This book is designed for neuropsychologists, counseling and rehabilitation psychologists, and other rehabilitation professionals who work with individuals who have sustained brain injuries of mild to moderate severity.

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Start by marking Neuropsychological Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Early chapters focus on different domains of cognitive functioning, while later chapters describe clinical approaches to helping clients manage common emotional reactions such as depression, irritability, and anxiety.

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Title: Neuropsychological Management of Mild. Publisher: Oxford University Press Publication Date: 2005 Binding: Hardcover Book Condition: Good. AbeBooks offers millions of new, used, rare and out-of-print books, as well as cheap textbooks from thousands of booksellers around the world.

Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. Volume 8, Issue 5. July 2002, pp. 728-729. State of the Art Services for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Neuropsychological Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, by Sarah A. Raskin and Catherine A. New York: Oxford University Press. Neurobehavioral Rehabilitation Services, St. Mary's Medical Center; Stanford University; UCSF.

Sarah Raskin, Catherine Mateer.

Long-term neuropsychological outcomes following mild traumatic brain injury. June 2005 · Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is common, yet few studies have examined neuropsychological outcomes more than 1 year postinjury. Studies of nonreferred individuals with MTBI or studies with appropriate control groups are lacking, but necessary to draw conclusions regarding natural recovery from MTBI.

This book is designed for neuropsychologists, counseling and rehabilitation psychologists, and other rehabilitation professionals who work with individuals who have sustained brain injuries of mild to moderate severity.

Despite the importance of the problem, strikingly little has been written about effective approaches to the treatment of individuals with mild to moderate brain injury. This book is designed for neuropsychologists, counseling and rehabilitation psychologists, and other rehabilitation professionals who work with individuals who have sustained brain injuries of mild to moderate severity. It provides a context for understanding and evaluating the common consequences of such injuries and offers both theoretical perspectives and practical suggestions for helping individuals to adjust to and compensate for residual difficulties. Early chapters focus on different domains of cognitive functioning, while later chapters describe clinical approaches to helping clients manage common emotional reactions such as depression, irritability, and anxiety. While the book acknowledges and discusses the controversy about the origins of persistent symptoms following mild brain injures, it does not focus on the controversy. Rather, it adopts a "what works" approach to dealing with individuals who have persistent symptoms and perceptions that contribute to disability and to emotional distress. Many of these individuals benefit significantly from neuropsychological intervention. Case examples throughout the book illustrate the adaptation of cognitive, cognitive-behavioral, and traditional psychotherapeutic approaches to individuals with mild to moderate brain injury. Self-regulation and self-management of both cognitive failures and emotional responses are described as appropriate and effective in this population.
Thank you
This book provides an accurate view of neuropsychological issues faced by people dealing with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). This review will focus on how the book lays out the components of MTBI. Although this book is intended for rehabilitation professionals in the neuropsychology and psychology field, it was easy for a college student to follow the succession of the materials presented. Furthermore, each chapter is supported by a case study to serve as an example and a summary for each main topic.

LAYOUT
The book, in my opinion, was separated into four main sections. The introductory section defines MTBI as it will be used throughout the book and describes the current state of MTBI management. It also includes descriptions of common posttraumatic sequelae, conditions that are consequences from a previous injury, and possible treatments for them. The introductory section closes with advice for dealing with MTBI assessment concerns. Assessments are usually questionnaires to understand the symptoms experienced by MTBI patients. Concerns arise from self-reporting symptoms and sensitivity of the questionnaires. There are also two post-concussion assessments included as examples at the end of the section.

The second section, which the book itself calls part two and three, is devoted to treatment of cognitive and emotional sequelae due to MTBI. The book provides examples of attention, memory and executive function case studies to show how MTBI might affect a person's cognitive abilities. Similarly, it provides examples of depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress, irritability, and anger case studies to show how MTBI might affect a person's emotional state. It also includes a few psychotherapy approaches to alleviate certain behaviors expressed by emotional sequelae.

The third section describes the rehabilitation and integration process back into the work force and the community of the patients. It utilizes a program that is divided into several components: intake/records review, vocational assessment, treatment plan/counseling, job placement/development, and postemployment job maintenance /follow-up services. It emphasizes the importance of a vocational counselor and gradual integration back into lifestyle routines.

The last section discusses MTBI issues in special populations such as: children, older age group, gender, socioeconomic status, and culture. Assessments and treatments of these groups vary to accommodate for their differences. For example, "lower status MTBI patients with fewer financial resources are more likely to request short-term treatment focused on immediate return to work." Or, when possible, assessments and treatments are done in the preferred language for different culture groups.

ASSESSMENT
Introductory
The introductory section of this book did a great job defining the injury. It included the pathophysiology and diagnostic criteria of MTBI. It also listed examples of the three different types of symptoms that are signs of MTBI occurrence; physical, cognitive, and behavioral. The book states: "Greater than 6.5 million people per year in the United States sustain "mild" head injuries...individuals may still suffer subtle cognitive and behavioral deficits...such persons are truly victims of what professionals are now calling the Silent Epidemic." This quote highlights the importance of accurate assessments of MTBI.

Cognitive and Emotional Sequelae
This portion of the book goes into great details of different cognitive and emotional sequelae examples. The most interesting parts of this section are the conclusions of the subtopics pertaining to cognitive and emotional sequelae. The book also includes a therapy plan to modify a target behavior. First, the MTBI patient and their therapist will identify the target problem behavior together. They will then make a list of treatment options together. However, it is up to the patient to select the most appropriate option allowing them to take responsibility for the success of the intervention. Their therapist will then provide training and support to implement the treatment. The patient is then encouraged to self-manage their symptom behavior. If successful, this method will not only help treat the target behavior, but also give the patient a boost of morale when their decision has a positive outcome.

Integration
This section emphasizes on the process of vocational rehabilitation. The components of the program are listed above. During the intake step, medical reports of the patients are reviewed for any psychosocial problems, physical or cognitive deficits. The vocational assessment is to test the skills and capabilities of the patients. The treatment plan step is to determine realistic vocational goals that can to be achieved. The patient will then be given a job that will later be followed up. This program allows the patient to gradually situate back into their normal routines, without being overwhelmed by immediate integration.

Special Populations
This part of the book provides a few statistics and trends in certain populations. It was interesting to see the different issues among different cultures in the United States. For example, "African Americans avoid mental health services primarily due to bad experiences with professionals who were not culturally competent." Or how "Latin American cultural backgrounds may be accustomed to attributing mental changes to external causes or physical symptoms..." Another comparison was between different age groups: the children and the elderly. Although most children recover from MTBI, there are no "conclusions about the effects of age, mechanism of injury and long-term outcome for this population." However, "compared to the younger survivors, they [elderly] may also exhibit acute behavior changed typically seen with dementia."

SUMMARY
Based on its intentions of being a good reference for rehabilitation professionals working with MTBI patients, this book succeeded in giving suggestions to help patients adjust to sequelae difficulties. Generally, I believe this book can be helpful for individuals living with MTBI patients also. Reading the case studies on physical and cognitive changes can give the individuals a guideline of how to work with the MTBI patient and perhaps what to presume. However, each patient will be affected differently, and individuals should not expect the same results.

RECCOMMENDATION
As a college student, I am not qualified to recommend this book to professionals. However, I would recommend this book to any individual who is interested in learning about MTBI rehabilitations and reading about different life situations pertaining to this topic. This book is not recommended for those who are only looking to find background information on MTBI.