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Christianity And The Social Crisis epub

by Walter Rauschenbusch


Christianity And The Social Crisis epub

ISBN: 1430449608

ISBN13: 978-1430449607

Author: Walter Rauschenbusch

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: Kessinger Publishing, LLC (January 17, 2007)

Pages: 444 pages

ePUB book: 1417 kb

FB2 book: 1661 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 245

Other Formats: doc txt lit mbr





Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tp.

Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tp. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

The Reverend Walter Rauschenbusch knew better in 1912. Later-coming Christians should read him and weep

The Reverend Walter Rauschenbusch knew better in 1912. Later-coming Christians should read him and weep. Rauschenbusch provides creative historical perspectives, including the ancient Hebrew prophets, the social teachings of Jesus, the mission of the 1st century church, the character of the medieval church, and early 20th century stresses in American society. This is an exceptional book for illuminating themes in liberal Christian theology and its potential relevance to contemporary challenges.

Walter Rauschenbusch (1861-1918) was a Christian theologian and Baptist minister, and a key figure in the Social Gospel .

Walter Rauschenbusch (1861-1918) was a Christian theologian and Baptist minister, and a key figure in the Social Gospel movement in the United States. He wrote in the Introduction of this 1907 book, the relation between Christianity and the social crisis is one of the most pressing questions for all intelligent man who realize the power of religion, and most of all for the religious leaders of the people who give direction to the forces of religio. ut it is plain to any thoughtful observer that the. common mind of the Christian Church in America has not begun to arrive at any solid convictions or any permanent basis of actio. .

Start by marking Christianity and the Social Crisis as Want to Read . He was a self-proclaimed socialist and spoke of true Christian "communism" as an ideal goal

Start by marking Christianity and the Social Crisis as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. He was a self-proclaimed socialist and spoke of true Christian "communism" as an ideal goal. Course, this was written before the Russian revolution, and his communism was that of the monastery or "Brooks Farm" - not one imposed by a totalitarian state.

Title: Christianity & the Social Crisis By: Walter Rauschenbusch Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 448 Vendor .

Title: Christianity & the Social Crisis By: Walter Rauschenbusch Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 448 Vendor: Westminster John Knox Press Publication Date: 1992. Dimensions: 6 X 9 (inches) Weight: 1 pound 2 ounces ISBN: 0664253210 ISBN-13: 9780664253219 Stock No: WW25321. In this book, he presents his path-breaking and prophetic interpretation of Jesus and the kingdom and his understanding of troubling conditions that call the church to faithful witness and to work toward meaningful political and economic reforms. The Library of Theological Ethics series focuses on what it means to think theologically and ethically.

Walter Rauschenbusch, a Baptist minister and theologian, advocated for a social gospel. Here, he explains why he believes Christianity must address social questions. It follows that the relation between Christianity and the social crisis is one of the most pressing questions for all intelligent men who realize the power of religion, and most of all for the religious leaders of the people who give direction to the forces of religion. The question has, in fact, been discussed frequently and earnestly, but it is plain to any thoughtful observer that the common mind of the Christian Church in America has not begun to arrive at any solid convictions or any permanent basis of action.

Walter Rauschenbusch (1861–1918) was an American theologian and Baptist pastor who taught at the Rochester Theological Seminary. Rauschenbusch was a key figure in the Social Gospel and single tax movements that flourished in the United States during. Rauschenbusch was a key figure in the Social Gospel and single tax movements that flourished in the United States during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He was also the maternal grandfather of the influential philosopher Richard Rorty and the great-grandfather of Paul Raushenbush.

Home Browse Books Book details, Christianity and the Social Crisis. Western civilization is passing through a social revolution unparalleled in history for scope and power. Christianity and the Social Crisis. By Walter Rauschenbusch. Its coming was inevitable. The religious, political, and intellectual revolutions of the past five centuries, which together created the modern world, necessarily had to culminate in an economic and social revolution such as is now upon us. By universal consent, this social crisis is the overshadowing problem of our generation.

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This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.
The book is decent, but there are some serious errors in it. Words are misspelled, butchered would be the better word for it. In some places the letters (because I can't even call them words) are so disjointed I can't make out what the word was supposed to be. In other places, a footnote appears right in the middle of a paragraph. In still other places, there are what looks like skips in the text? I'm not even sure. It's mostly readable, but it's riddled with errors.
This is a classic statement of early 20th century Christian liberal theology, which is still relevant to social and theological issues in the early 21st century. Rauschenbusch provides creative historical perspectives, including the ancient Hebrew prophets, the social teachings of Jesus, the mission of the 1st century church, the character of the medieval church, and early 20th century stresses in American society. This is an exceptional book for illuminating themes in liberal Christian theology and its potential relevance to contemporary challenges.
Rauschenbusch carries you briskly along the thought path of Jesus and the New Testament. His language is crystal clear and refreshing. I have thoroughly enjoy this book, and have followed up with a great deal of Biblical study.
I haven't yet read the entirety of Rauschenbusch's classic, and so will not attempt to review in content what others have done far more adequately.

What I will say is that the formatting on this version is AWFUL! I've converted PDF documents to Kindle format with greater accessibility than this version has. Please don't be dumb like me and preview the contents before you decide to buy this book! Upon opening, you will find that every scanned page is broken into two separate pages so that there is far less reading fluidity than desirable and, what is worse, the pagination is a mess if you need to turn to a specific passage quickly. Individual word selection function is disabled, so forget using the dictionary function, let alone highlight or note-taking (unless you're satisfied with highlighting a half page and making a specific comment about a general block of text). And to top it off, whatever version was scanned originally had notes and underlining, so you too can benefit from the marginal (meant in both senses of the word) and sporadic notes and scribbles accompanying the text.

Let me be completely clear: I'm a cheap-ass, and if I had received this book for free, I would have given it a solid 4 stars for someone's honest, if misguided, attempt to transfer Christianity and the Social Crisis into electronic format without typing a word or even running it through re-formatting software. Because I paid, however, I feel like a dupe. Check the slightly more expensive and less fancy looking version before buying this one...from what I can tell, it even has a table of contents with chapter and sub-chapter hyperlinks. Well worth the extra four bucks...
This reprint (original Book from 1907) opened my eyes: 100 years ago there were the same problems that the US has today, This tells me humans are very slow learners. Rauschenbusch,the author,in particular points out a total failure of the religions to address this problem.To day,the only one to say anything is the new Pope Francis. If only the actors,I mean politicians would listen! I recommend this book to all Christian Ministers. The author himself was a Baptist Minister.
The pages are sideways. Do not buy it until fixed! Almost impossible to read. Get the new version (...in the 21st century).
Walter Rauschenbusch (1861-1918) was a Christian Theologian and Baptist Minister. He was one of the most important figures in the "Social Gospel" movement, and later wrote books such as Christianizing the Social Order,A Theology for the Social Gospel,The Social Principles Of Jesus,A Gospel for the Social Awakening: Selections from the Writings of Walter Rauschenbusch, etc. [NOTE: page numbers below refer to a 429-page edition .]

He wrote in the Introduction of this 1907 book, “the relation between Christianity and the social crisis is one of the most pressing questions for all intelligent man who realize the power of religion, and most of all for the religious leaders of the people who give direction to the forces of religion… but it is plain to any thoughtful observer that the common mind of the Christian Church in America has not begun to arrive at any solid convictions or any permanent basis of action…. This book is to serve as a contribution to this discussion… The outcome of these first … chapters is that ‘the essential purpose of Christianity was to transform human society into the kingdom of God by regenerating all human relations and reconstituting them in accordance with the will of God… (This) raises the question why the Christian Church has never undertaken to carry out this fundamental purpose of its existence.”

He admits, “In truth Jesus was not a social reformer of the modern type… He saw the evil in the life of men and their sufferings, but he approached these facts purely from the moral, and not from the economic or historical point of view. He wanted men to live a right life in common, and only insofar as the social questions are moral questions did he deal with them as they confronted him. And he was more than a teacher of morality. Jesus had learned the deepest and rarest secret of all---how to live a religious life.” (Pg. 47) He adds, “no man shares his life with God whose religion does not flow out… into all relations of his life and reconstructs everything that it touches. Whoever uncouples the religious and the social life has not understood Jesus.” (Pg. 48)

He summarizes, “We saw at the outset that Jesus was not a mere social reformer… He has been called the first socialist. He was more; he was the first real man, the inaugurator of a new humanity. But as such he bore within him the germs of a new social and political order. He was too great to be the Savior of a fractional part of human life. His redemption extends to all human needs and powers and relations… But if we were forced to classify him either with the great theologians … or with the mighty popes and princes of the Church… or with the man who are giving their heart and life to the propaganda of a new social system---where should we place him?” (Pg. 92)

He explains that after Jesus’ death, “the disciples at Jerusalem simply continued the life they had lived with the Master… They had a common purse… they continued a family life among themselves and shared what they had As their number increased… Those who were better off… replenished the common purse by larger offerings… But whatever the extent of this generosity may have been, it was always generosity, and not communism in any proper sense of the word… Thus the church at Jerusalem was not quite as communistic as is usually supposed. On the other hand, the other churches were not as completely devoid of communistic features as is commonly assumed.” (Pg. 121-123)

He summarizes, “The fundamental purpose of Jesus was the establishment of the kingdom of God, which involved a thorough regeneration and reconstitution of social life. Primitive Christianity cherished an ardent hope of a radically new era… Thus Christianity as an historical movement was launched with all the purpose and hope, all the impetus and power, of a great revolutionary movement, pledged to change the world-as-it-is into the world-as-it-ought-to-be.” (Pg. 143)

He notes “The Church is rendering some service today in opposing child labor and the sweat-shop system, which are among the culminating atrocities of the wages system, but its conscience has not at all awakened to the wrongfulness of the wages system as a whole, on which our industry rests.” (Pg. 149)

He admits, “It is correctly asserted that the apostles undertook no social propaganda. Paul held no antislavery meetings… Paul was not an anti-slavery man. He doubtless realized the oppressive conditions of many slaves, just as we recognize the hard lot of miners of oyster-dredgers. But to his lofty idealism outward conditions were almost indifferent. He himself bore poverty and homelessness almost with equanimity for Christ’s sake… This is sublime, but it is too rare an atmosphere for the mass of men…” (Pg. 153) Later, he adds, “one of the most important contributions of Paul to spiritual religion [was] that he denied utterly that man could earn merit with God… When the capitalistic impulse tries to accumulate a cash balance in heaven and do business with the Lord on a debit and credit basis, commercialism poisons religion.” (Pg. 168-169)

He observes, “To say that Christianity in the past largely … missed its greatest mission, is not to condemn the men of the past. They followed the light they had… If destiny had put me on the chair of St. Peter, I hope I should have made a good fight against the encroachments of the secular power on the sacred heritage of Christ… But being a twentieth-century Christian, I hope I shall do nothing of the kind. If men of the past flinched in following their ideals, they must answer to God for it. Also if they consciously taught what was unchristian, or quenched the better light in others.” (Pg. 200-201)

He asserts forcefully, “The rapacity of commerce has been the secret spring of most recent wars. Speculative finance is the axis on which international politics revolve… It defrauds the consumer who buys its goods. It drains and brutalizes the workman who does its work… If money dominates, the ideal cannot dominate. If we serve mammon, we cannot serve the Christ.” (Pg. 270-271)

He points out, “When a certain line of poverty has been passed, the churches lose their hole almost completely, in spite of the most heroic efforts of Christian men and women. A social system which lifts a small minority into great wealth, and submerges a great number in poverty, is this directly hostile to the interests of the Church. A system which would distribute wealth with approximate fairness and equality would offer honest religion the best working chance.” (Pg. 308)

He warns, “When two moral principles are … forced into practical antagonism in daily life, the question is which will be the stronger. If the Church cannot Christianize commerce, commerce will commercialize the Church. When the churches buy and sell, they follow the usual methods and often drive hard bargains.” (Pg. 314)

He summarizes, “This is the stake of the Church in the social crisis. If one vast domain of life is dominated by principles antagonistic to the ethics of Christianity, it will inculcate habits and generate ideas which will undermine the law of Christ in all other domains of life and even deny the theoretical validity of it. If the Church has not faith enough in the Christian law to assert its sovereignty over all relations of society, men will deny that it is a good and practicable law at all. If the Church cannot conquer business, business will conquer the Church.” (Pg. 316-317)

He states, “Every great movement which so profoundly stirs men, unlocks the depths of their religious nature, just as great experiences in our personal life make the individual susceptible to religious emotion… The large hope which then beckons man the ideal of justice and humanity which inspires them, the devotion and self-sacrifice to the cause which they exhibit---these are in truth religious.” (Pg. 319)

He asserts, “It is the business of a preacher to connect all that he thinks and says with the mind and will of God, to give the religious interpretation to all human relations and questions, and to infuse the divine sympathy and passion into all moral discussions. If he fails in that, he is to that extent not a minister of religion.” (Pg. 364)

He proposes, “The question is not how quickly Christian thought will realize that individualism is coming to be an inadequate and antiquated form of social organization which must give place to a higher form of communistic organization, and how thoroughly it will comprehend that this new communism will afford a far nobler social basis for the spiritual temple of Christianity.” (Pg. 396-397)

He concludes, “In asking for faith in the possibility of a new social order, we ask for no Utopian delusion. We know well that there is no perfection for man in this life: there is only growth toward perfection… We shall never abolish suffering. There will always be death and the empty chair and heart… The strong will always have the impulse to exert their strength, and no system can be devised which can keep them from crowding and jostling the weaker… At best there is always but an approximation to a perfect social order. The kingdom of God is always but coming.” (Pg. 420-421)

This book will be “must reading,” along with Rauschenbusch’s other books, for anyone seriously the Social Gospel movement, or “political theology” in general.