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Shooting Kennedy: JFK and the Culture of Images epub

by David M. Lubin


Shooting Kennedy: JFK and the Culture of Images epub

ISBN: 0520229851

ISBN13: 978-0520229853

Author: David M. Lubin

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: University of California Press; First edition (November 22, 2003)

Pages: 356 pages

ePUB book: 1912 kb

FB2 book: 1882 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 851

Other Formats: mbr doc azw lrf





Lubin examines images from the life and death of John Fitzgerald Kennedy with wit, a keen eye and an extraordinarily broad .

Lubin examines images from the life and death of John Fitzgerald Kennedy with wit, a keen eye and an extraordinarily broad range of reference. For a book stuffed with provocative ideas, "Shooting Kennedy's average is surprisingly good. The daring of Lubin's approach is as instructive as his often startling results. -"Publishers Weekly". Interesting background to photographs and the book is not all about Kennedy but other subjects too. I think the value of this book is showing how photographs further the perpetuation of Kennedy as an American icon even 50 years after his death.

In Shooting Kennedy, David Lubin speculates on the allure of these and other iconic images of the Kennedys, using them to illuminate the entire American cultural landscape. He draws from a spectacularly varied intellectual and visual painting, Victorian poetry, modern art, Hollywood films, TV sitcoms-to show how the public came to identify personally with the Kennedys and how, in so doing, they came to understand their place in the world.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Shooting Kennedy book. Starting with images of Jackie and Jack including the assasination, David Lubin explores late 20th century American culture. I love this kind of thing - vast, associative, intermedia. Jack & Jackie sailing at Hyannis Port.

David M. Lubin (born November 24, 1950) is an American writer, professor, curator, and scholar. He has published six books on American art, film, and popular culture. He has published six books on American art, film, and popular culture

In Shooting Kennedy, David Lubin speculates on the allure of these and other iconic images of the Kennedys, using them to illuminate the entire American cultural landscape. Jack and Jackie sailing at Hyannis Port. President Kennedy smiling and confident with the radiant first lady by his side in Dallas shortly before the assassination. Jackie Kennedy mourning at the funeral while her small son salutes the coffin. These images have become larger than life; more than simply photographs of a president, or of celebrities, or of a tragic event, they have an extraordinary power to captivate-today as in their own time.

Book DescriptionJack and Jackie sailing at Hyannis Port. Jackie Kennedy mourning at the funeral while her smallson salutes the coffin.

SHOOTING KENNEDY may, thus, for some readers, seem a bizarre and desacralizing example of the kind of. .So will the parallels he finds between the structure of the Zapruder film and the standard Hollywood movie both now and then.

SHOOTING KENNEDY may, thus, for some readers, seem a bizarre and desacralizing example of the kind of "relativistic" post-modern cultural criticism that upends and sabotages the "milestone event" narrations of history by treating everything as a cultural text, everything as grist for the cultural critique mill. As an example of this technique, Lubin, late in the book, examines a LIFE magazine spread showing a liquor ad featuring a dandy tipping his hat in salute on the page facing the famous photo of John John's salute of his father's passing coffin.

Download Citation On Feb 1, 2005, Andrea Dahlberg and others published Shooting Kennedy: Jfk and the Culture of.

Download Citation On Feb 1, 2005, Andrea Dahlberg and others published Shooting Kennedy: Jfk and the Culture of Images by David M. Lubin. University of California Press, Berkeley, CA, .

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Jack and Jackie sailing at Hyannis Port. President Kennedy smiling and confident with the radiant first lady by his side in Dallas shortly before the assassination. The Zapruder film. Jackie Kennedy mourning at the funeral while her small son salutes the coffin. These images have become larger than life; more than simply photographs of a president, or of celebrities, or of a tragic event, they have an extraordinary power to captivate―today as in their own time. In Shooting Kennedy, David Lubin speculates on the allure of these and other iconic images of the Kennedys, using them to illuminate the entire American cultural landscape. He draws from a spectacularly varied intellectual and visual terrain―neoclassical painting, Victorian poetry, modern art, Hollywood films, TV sitcoms―to show how the public came to identify personally with the Kennedys and how, in so doing, they came to understand their place in the world. This heady mix of art history, cultural history, and popular culture offers an evocative, consistently entertaining look at twentieth-century America. Marilyn Monroe, Sylvia Plath, Donna Reed, Playboy magazine, Jack Ruby, the Rosenbergs, and many more personalities, little-known events, and behind-the-scenes stories of the era enliven Lubin's account as he unlocks the meaning of these photographs of the Kennedys. Elegantly conceived, witty, and intellectually daring, Shooting Kennedy becomes a stylish meditation on the changing meanings of visual phenomena and the ways they affect our thinking about the past, the present, and the process of history.
I think the title is a bit offensive even though I know it is a play on words. Interesting background to photographs and the book is not all about Kennedy but other subjects too. I think the value of this book is showing how photographs further the perpetuation of Kennedy as an American icon even 50 years after his death.
A fascinating read. Very well written. A bid cynical toward the end, but a tremendously imaginative treatment of the topic of Kennedy and popular culture.
Of the books that have been published on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the Kennedy assassination on display in my local bookstore, which include memorial editions of LIFE and LOOK magazine that compile all the iconic photos of that time (and sponsored by the History Channel in one case), SHOOTING KENNEDY is a bracing antidote to the lachrymose nonsense posing as historical insight and edifying remembrance that litter the publishing landscape.
In SHOOTING KENNEDY, Lubin employs a process that in post-modern cultural critique has become the prevailing strategy: the Dadaist practice of placing on the dissection table the sewing machine and the umbrella and reporting on their encounter. SHOOTING KENNEDY may, thus, for some readers, seem a bizarre and desacralizing example of the kind of "relativistic" post-modern cultural criticism that upends and sabotages the "milestone event" narrations of history by treating everything as a cultural text, everything as grist for the cultural critique mill.
As an example of this technique, Lubin, late in the book, examines a LIFE magazine spread showing a liquor ad featuring a dandy tipping his hat in salute on the page facing the famous photo of John John's salute of his father's passing coffin. He then offers a disquisition on the suggested birth of the salute in the era of the knight errant, who it is believed, lifted up the visor on his helmet to show another knight his eyes to show he intended no harm. He then goes on to discuss the notion of Camelot as a metaphor for the Kennedy presidency, and then ties in JFK's boyhood reading during his sickly childhood of romantic tales of knighthood by Sir Walter Scott and others.
To the average reader of political history, this will seem an inappropriate invasion of one discipline into the precincts of another -- in this case materials of history and politics examined with theories and tools of art criticism. The similarities Lubin finds between notable paintings from the Western canon and news photos of the Kennedy's and JFK's assassination will seem superfluous, beside the point. So will the parallels he finds between the structure of the Zapruder film and the standard Hollywood movie both now and then. Average readers will be more comfortable with coincidence as the principle behind the suggestive links he finds in history and art,(e.g., Oswald jumping onto the stage in the Dallas movie theater where he sought to hide from the police, John Wilkes Booth jumping onto the stage of the Ford Theater after shooting Lincoln, the Nazi villain in Lubitsch¹s "To Be or Not to Be" being chased onto the stage before being captured and killed), and less comfortable with the idea that life and art are inseparable and dialogic. This approach may seem destabilizing and even decadent. Lubin admits as much. Indeed, he often recognizes that his approach may serve to cast dirt on the icons whose images and histories he examines. He explains that this is not his intent; one's reaction will depend entirely upon whether mentioning Camelot and the Beverly Hillbillies in the same breath seems appropriate.
The post-modern argument has come to prevail in the academy, although in fact it was never really all that radical a position to begin with: reasonable readers of history always recognized that whatever claims to the contrary, historians came to their work with agendas (even "objectivity" is an agenda). Historians, like art historians and art critics develop followings depending on both their skills as a storyteller as well as by how well they support their version of history in their selection of and retelling of facts. In both cases, what emerges always is the sensibility of the critic. There are schools of history in the same way there are schools of art and art criticism.
Still, even accepting the post-modern notions of the text, Lubin's selection of facts and materials has something of the magpie about it -- meaning that his choices, while mostly hits are occasional misses. For instance, how relevant is it that Marat's assassin was the same age as Lee Harvey Oswald? This "insight" is one of those stray facts that pose as enlightening but are not. It is the same kind of quasi-fascinating fact that conspiracy theorists yoke together in their fantastic farragoes. Incidentally, Lubin does an excellent job on the cultural output of these re-writers of the circumstances of the assassination. He takes no sides, he only examines their output in conjunction with that of other forms of reportage, history and journalism.
Altogether an illuminating, creative, and corrective work of criticism.